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#1024667 - 27/10/2011 19:05 Burketown Cyclone 1887
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
On the 5th of March 1887, a cyclone hit the remote town of Burketown, killing 7. The BOM website records it as such....

"From all reports, the storm surge from the disastrous 1887 cyclone, flooded almost all of Burketown. Only the highest part of town, near where the Council Office is currently located, escaped the waters from the Gulf of Carpentaria. A copy of a 1918 report to the Queensland Parliament from the Department of Harbours and Rivers Engineers refers to the sea rising to 5.5 metres above the highest spring tide level at the Albert River Heads. This level is about 8 metres above Australian Height Datum. 7 people out of a population of 138 died in the cyclone. Storm winds commenced at 11 am from the SE and backed to the E and the NE increasing in violence until 10 pm when virtually the whole of Burketown was devastated. The storm surge arrived at 7 pm."(http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/about/cyclones-gulf-impacts.shtml)

Little else is recorded, but while researching my family tree, I stumbled upon so much more than the dry description above.

It turns out, my great-great-uncle (John Charles Frederick Higman) had been living in Burketown for the previous 3+ years.
In mid 1885, he applied for leave. I have a copy of his police file, obtained through the Qld State Archives. (AF 799 A/38838 c18960 The following letter is among it's contents.

"Police Department
Burketown
24/4/85

Const. JF Higman No 339 applies to the Commissioner of Police for three months leave of absence from about the 30th of July next until the 30th of October, without pay.
The Const. has most important private business that should be attended to. The reason the Const. requires such a long time is because Burketown is a difficult place to get away from.
JF Higman
Police Constable
Burketown"

The letter is marked "Granted Without Pay" and dated 17/6/85.

In the next issue...I'll put forward a hypothesis on what sort of important private business he had to attend to! Won't be long, and we'll get to the cyclone....


Edited by boxsey (27/10/2011 19:23)

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#1024668 - 27/10/2011 19:11 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Excellent work Boxey.

I have also editted the original entry in Trove http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13629530 to correct the scanning errors. Looking forward to the next installment. It is going to make a damn fine historical novel.

I have also Tagged the article as Burketown Cyclone so people can now find it with a Google search.
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#1024680 - 27/10/2011 19:38 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boomer]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
I think the date of march 12 is when news finally got to the east coast, it definately hit on march 5th. (I'll back that up later!!!)

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#1024682 - 27/10/2011 19:44 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boomer Offline
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Registered: 21/11/2010
Posts: 3558
Loc: Cairns
Sorry,
I'm pulling back on posts so I can watch Boxsey's story unfold


Edited by boomer (27/10/2011 19:45)
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#1024684 - 27/10/2011 19:46 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
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Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Yes I think your right Boxey because in the online newspaper scan they talk about riding as far as they can following the telegraph line but it was completely destroyed and they where blocked from going any further by flood waters so until that was either repaired or somebody got out of the area (by sea or by horseback) there would have been no news about what had happened. I don't know, yet, how the news got out but that alone would be worth a chapter I would have thought. Hint, hint. wink
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#1024691 - 27/10/2011 20:21 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
So, where were we. Constable John Charles Frederick Higman has urgent business down south and needs 3 months off to get away from Burketown. But why? Well...here's a clue. He went to Burketown as a single man, and yet in 1887, lost his wife and 2 kids in the cyclone.
Here is what I know.
JCF Higman initally served in the NSW Police Force. In November 1883, he is "desirous of entering the Service in Queensland" (letter, from Police File). He's admitted to the service, and immediately transferred to Burketown.

In 1884, a child is born in Sydney, NSW to Julia Huckins. No father is listed on the birth certificate. But...the kids name? Charles F. Huckins. (NSW 3040/1884) Charles F....see the connection?

Now, I'm guessing, having left the state, he took a bit of tracking down...but in mid 1885, John CF Higman applies for leave from Burketown...and marries....yes, you guessed it....Julia Huckins in Sydney. (NSW 1430/1885)

He then makes his way back to Burketown, with Julia and baby in tow, presumably. Stopping off in Brisbane, he writes the following letter requesting transfer away from Burketown...presumably he knows it's not an easy place for a young 22 year old woman with a baby to live.

"
Brisbane, September 7th, 85

The Commissioner of Police,
Brisbane.

Sir,
Constable JF Higman No.339 respectfully applies to the Commissioner of Police to be transferred from the Gulf Country.

The Const. during his last six months Police duty has suffered a great deal from the fever and ague and has been advised by Medical Men to try a change of climate. The Const. has now done 18 months police duty in Burketown.

Should the Commissioner think proper to transfer the const to any other station, the Const. would like to resume duty at once as he can ill afford to be idle.

Trusting the Commissioner will kindly consider this application.

JF Higman
Police Const.
Burketown Station"



No mention of the new wife and child, just fever and ague. Burketown had a reputation for "the ague". First settled in 1864, the place was abandoned by 1871, after an outbreak of "Gulf Fever" or "Yellow Fever". Many died, and the remainder mostly fled to Sweers Island to live. It wasn't until 1883 that the town started up again.

Anyway, I digress. The Commissioner certainly did consider the application, and responded by scrawling across the letter "To return to his station". And so it was set...Constable Higman, returned to Burketown with his wife and baby.

Another child soon followed. Francis Albert Higman was born in 1886 (Qld 1886/C755). It's hard to imagine how remote and hard life must have been for Julia and her kids. Her husband was a mounted policeman, and would have been out on patrol for days at a time. In addition, he would escort prisoners to Normanton, by boat, leaving her home with the kids in one of the most isolated settlements in Australia at the time. Indeed, he was in Normanton on escort when on March 5th 1887, the cyclone hit Burketown.


Edited by boxsey (27/10/2011 20:22)

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#1024693 - 27/10/2011 20:49 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
As you can imagine, communication was tough and it took a bit for news to get out. Burketown was completely isolated, as SBT said, as the telegraph was out of action. The area is impassable in the wet season...trust me, I've tried it in a 4WD, and it ain't pretty. The only way in and out was by boat. Back in those days Burketown was "quiet badly served" as far as transport went. There was only one small steamer, the "Water Lily" owned by Burns, Philp and Co, and one lighter, the "Samson" owned by Robinson.

The first newspaper article or telegram seems to have reached the east coast on the 8th of March. Reported in "The Queenslander" on 12th of March is the following...
"The Assistant Engineer-in-Chief for Harbours and Rivers received the following telegram, dated Normanton, 8th March, from Mr. E. A. Cullen, nautical surveyor, who is carrying out surveys in the Gulf of Carpentaria:—"A fresh gale from the northward oc- curred on Saturday with heavy rain squalls: the barometer indicated 29*84 in. at its lowest. There was a very heavy sea running, and a remarkably high tide. This tide was 2ft. 6in. higher than the highest tide of last year. The beacon in the channel has gone, and the pilot boats were washed away. I shall have to again examine the channel through the banks to determine if outer banks have shifted. The weather is still bad, but the sea is not so heavy, and the winds are moderate."
The same paper also outlines flooding in Emerald and Clermont...I'm assuming it's all the aftermath of the cyclone.


Edited by boxsey (27/10/2011 20:52)

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#1024699 - 27/10/2011 21:10 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
So, at this point, I'm guessing even those in Normanton had no clue what had gone on elsewhere. (The story will become clearer to you all as more news gets out....I'm sticking with a chronological timeline, so as to try and not miss anything!)

The next piece of evidence I have is a telegram, sent by Const. JCF Higman to the Commisioner of Police. It seems from the text, that he had managed to get back to Burketown, as he wrote the telegram on the 11th of March, but it was sent from Kimberley (which is now known as Kurumba) on the 12th of March (one imagines his note went from Burketown to Kimberley Telegraph station on the returning boat). It's gut wrenching, and reads as follows....

"[i]From Kimberley Dated 12/3/1887
Message for Comm Police

My wife and two children washed away from here and drowned during my absence on escort duty to Normanton. Would you kindly remove me south earliest convenience.
JCF Higman
Const.
Burketown 1
1th[/i]."

The Commissioner appears to have read the telegram on the 15th of March as it's sprawled with the following...
"(?)Insp. Donghaue(?) to remove the Constable to Normanton at once and transfer him to Brisbane first opportunity."
You have to wonder if anyone on the east coast had yet realised what a terrible calamity had struck in Burketown. I'm guessing Const. Higman was on the first boat back into Burketown after the storm, so his note to the Commissioner may have been just one of many sent out requesting help.

Sadly, my camera has run out of batteries and I can't take a photo tonight of the telegram. I'll stop then for tonight, and resume tomorrow night!


Edited by boxsey (27/10/2011 21:11)

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#1024751 - 28/10/2011 07:53 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville

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#1024752 - 28/10/2011 08:08 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Indeed, the Brisbane Courier (14/3/1885) reports receiving a telegram on the 12th of March, the message of which would most likely found it's way from Burketown to Kimberley with the one above before being transmitted, and seems it's the first word to the outside world of the cyclone.

"The following telegram, dated 12th instant, has been received by the Meteorological Observer, Brisbane, from Mr P P Agnew, telegraph manager, Burketown" On the 5th instant heavy rain fell. The rainfall from 9 am till 11 am was 1.84in. The gale gradually increased in violence until 2 pm, when a terrific cyclone was raging-, the wind shifting to north-east and then east north-east, with torrents of rain. It reached its greatest height between 7 and 8 pm , completely wrecking the township. The river rose rapidly like a tidal wave to a height of 14ft, and receded rapidly about 10 pm. Deadfish, etc , were strewn for a considerable distance over the plain. The rain gauge was carried away, and I cannot therefore give the rainfall. Heavy thunderstorms have prevailed since the cyclone "

I get the feeling, if Mr P P Agnew were alive today, he might be a member of this forum.....

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#1024773 - 28/10/2011 09:59 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
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Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
I think you doing a great job Boxey and yes I agree that he would more than likely be a member. The really difficult part of this cyclone story, apart from the obvious gut wrenching human interest angle is that we will probably never know the actual track of the cyclone nor of the true numbers of people killed. Remember that aboriginal deaths from natural disasters where rarely counted in those days indeed up to and including STC Tracey. That a chinaman wasn't named but just reported as a chinaman is also indicative of the prevailing contempt held by the entire community of anyone who wasn't white.
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#1024795 - 28/10/2011 11:31 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
Dawgggg Offline
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Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23684
Loc: Townsville
Wow boxesy, myself having lived in Normanton for a few years and making lots of trips to burketown over the years, I really am interested in this thread. It's almost like a personal thing to be reading about what had happened to those towns.
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#1024846 - 28/10/2011 13:18 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Dawgggg]
marakai Offline
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Registered: 05/01/2006
Posts: 1836
Loc: Maryfarms NQ
Thanks for sharing.

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#1024861 - 28/10/2011 14:42 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: marakai]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Absolutely SBT. I hope that the local indigenous people would have known the place's history of flooding...and got the hell out of there. We'll never know I guess.
Lots more to come, glad someone other than me is getting something out of the story!

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#1024865 - 28/10/2011 14:49 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
So then, on the 15/3/1885, the Sydney Morning Herald reported similar, but with a bit extra detail. Thanks for fixing the digitisation errors SBT!
Now we start to get the picture about the loss of life, and sadly, that included Julia Higman, wife of Constable Higman, and both their infant sons.

"THE CYCLONE- AT BURKETOWN,

LOSS OF SEVERAL LIVES.

| By Telegraph

(From our own correspondent.)

BURKETOWN (via Normanton), Monday

On Saturday morning, at IO o'clock, a terrific cyclone commenced blowing, accompanied hy heavy rain from S.E. It gradually increased in violenco up to about 2 o'clock, when fearful destruction commenced. The river rose 2 feet in half an hour, and ultimately reached the height of 8 feet above summer level. The storm continued for 12 hours, every building in the town being more or loss destroyed, except the Custom and Court Houses. Some were completely wrecked. The men turned out and endeavoured to save lives, but in spite of all their efforts two women, two children, and a Chinaman perished. Tho loss of horses and stock is very great. The telegraph-posts were snapped like glass, and the whole of the line was totally destroyed as far as it is possible to travel along it. The post and telegraph offices were wrecked, and the instruments and mails were only saved by the postmaster at great per- sonal risk. Many destitute families have been suc- coured by the police magistrate, and the sergeant of police, ably assisted by his wife. Great hospitality was shown to many of the sufferers by the manager of tho Queensland National Bank , assisted by the postmaster. Many business people are hopelessly ruined. The loss to Messrs. Aplin and Brown is variously estimated at fiom £12,000 to £20,000. Two men on the road with a team perished in the

storm.

BRISBANE, Monday.

Later news from Burketown, via Normanton, states that the gale lasted for 12 hours. Nearly all the buildings in the town were either unroofed or blown down, excepting the Custom House and Courthouse, which were not very much damaged. The destitute families were provided with accommodation in these buildings. The water is one foot above the floor of the Courthouse. Mrs. Catherino Williams, Mrs. Higman and two children, a carrier named James M'Ginn, and his mate, and a Chinaman were drowned, although mostly all the men in the township turned out and exerted themselves bravely to save their lives. The boats of the post and telegraph oflices were totally destroyed, and the instruments were greatly damaged. The Customs boat was carried away. Many business people have been hopelessly ruined.

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#1024867 - 28/10/2011 15:03 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
So it's now been ten days since the cyclone, and only now does the extent of the tragedy start filtering through to the east coast settlements. Can you imagine the conditions those who survived had to live in. They'd have had to rely on themselves for pretty much everything, as help was a long way away.
Most newspapers repeated the story, but snippets of extra info are found.
For example, the (Rockhampton) Morning Bulletin (15/3/1885) states that
"Fuller reports concerning; the cyclone at Burketown on the 5th instant state the storm lasted for about twelve hours, and every building in the town was more or less wrecked except the Customs and Court Houses. The Post and Telegraph Office was wrecked, but the instruments and mails were saved at great personal risk by the Postmaster. The tele- graph poles were snapped like glass, and the line totally destroyed for a distance of many miles. The river overflowed its banks, and submerged portion of the town."
And...
"Many are destitute, and they are being succoured by local officials. Many of the business people hare been hopelessly rained. The losses sus- tained by Messrs. Aplin, Brown, anlCo. are estimated at from £12,000 to £20,000, The damage to horses and stock is very great."

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#1024873 - 28/10/2011 15:14 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
From the Cairns Post, March 17th 1885. A little repetition, but some additional detail.

"LATEST BY WIRE.

(FROM OUR OWN cORRESPONDENT)

QUEENSLAND.

- NORMANTON, March 13.

A terrible cyclone and flood like a tidal wave visited Burketown on Saturday, the 5th instant, lasting from 1 p.m. till nearly 5 p.m.

on Sunday. The town was almost completely, wrecked. Messrs. Aplin, Brown's store was terribly damaged, aud most of the stock destroyed ; -?Robt. Graham and Co's store was partly unroofed ; Kelly's, William's, and Haly's hotels were overthrown ; the Customs and Police buildings escaped; the Telegraph office was unroofed, and the line was torn away from the poles, and twisted into every shape, the mails and instruments were saved by a punt and carried away to the racecourse. The Uncle Tom sank in the river, and is now stuck on the bank, and the Alice Gray was blown high and dry on the bank. Mrs. Williams, Mrs. Higman, two children, and two carriers, while on their way to Towns- ville, and one chinaman were drowned. Every house in the town is blown down or unroofed, except the Customs House, the Police Bar- racks, and a billiard room at the Commercial Hotel. The Punjaub station buildings were totally wrecked. Great praise is due to Mr. aud Mrs. Synott, Sergeant and Mrs. Fer- guson, and Mr. Tracy for sheltering the homeless. Mr. Lawson, the police magis-

trate has distributed some 100 blankets to

people who lost everything. There has been great loss in stock, and the damage is estimated at over 20.000. The water in the streets was from five to six feet high."

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#1024874 - 28/10/2011 15:28 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Then, on the 8th of April, pretty much a full month after the tragedy, a full description of the event was published in the (Brisbane) Courier Mail. It's a long article...go have a pee, or make yourself a coffee before you tackle it. I promise you though, it's a article worth reading. Note that the paper dates the report as 10th of March....I'm guessing it was way too much to send via morse code, and would have been sent by mail on a boat. Gives you some indication of how long it took to get from Burketown all the way around to the south east corner of Queensland. I've taken the liberty of breaking the text into paragraphs, to help the reading. Hope you find it as riveting as I do!


TERRIFIC GALE AT BURKETOWN.

(From the Carpentaria, Times' Correspondent.)

Burketown, March IO.

On Saturday morning, the 5th instant, it was noticed that the weather had suddenly changed from heat and oppressiveness to unusual cold, with a south-cast wind blowing. About 11 o'clock a.m. the wind became very much stronger and rain fell heavily. This continued without cessation until about 2 o'clock, when the wind and rain had increased in violence to an alarming extent, and the first sign of the terrible destruction that was to follow was made manifest by the veranda of Haly's Carpentaria Hotel being blown over on to the roof. Some there were who at- tempted to secure their roofs by placing tires of waggon wheels upon them, and tying the iron down with ropes ; but all to no purpose ; the ropes were broken like twine, and the tires sent whirling into the air to a height of 20ft.

The next erections to go were the outbuildings at Kelly's Albert Hotel, and the stables of the late W. H. Young. Then came the utter collapse of the telegraph line, some of the posts of which were bent double, while others were snapped short off by nothing but the force of the wind. The angle-posts, which are of wood, and great weight, were blown completely out of the ground, and when these went the wire was carried over the roof of the Commercial Hotel. About this time Mr. Raff's cottage began to show signs of giving away-first the veranda posts were smashed, letting the roof of the veranda fall in, which was immediately taken possession of by the wind and carried away, taking with it a portion of the main roof. Looking along the street one saw the Post and Telegraph Office gradually disappearing as the sheets of iron were wrenched off and went flying over the plain, while in the other direction were to be seen thoe complete roof of six now bedrooms lately erected at the Commercial blown over tho top of the houses and deposited in the yard. Where but a few moments before had stood Kelly's Albert Hotel, was now, with the ex- ception of the billiard-room, nothing but a total wreck. The bedrooms as they stood had been turned completely over, followed by the kitchen. At 4 o'clock in the afternoon the rain was driven along with such merciless velocity as to make it impossible for anyone to look to windward for a single instant.

With iron and timber flying about in such quantities, it now became a matter of great danger to leave any shelter ; but in spite of the risk there were those to be found ready and willing to exert themselves in attempting to save others who were unable to take measures for their own security.

Among the latter was the wife and two children of Constable Higman, who were living in a cottage quite removed from town, and within thirty or forty yards of a lagoon, which soon after the storm commenced, assumed the proportion of an immense river. About half-past 4 o'clock it was suggested that some one should go over to the assistance of this family, and Messrs. Catt, Stiles, and Bradley left the bank with that intention. Getting out of the shelter of the house the three were simply lifted off their feet and blown with great violence into tho fence that surrounds Mr. Raff's cottage; and the only way that any advance could bo made was by going down on hands and knees. Two of the party at length reached O'Sullivan's cot- tage, which is a few hundred yards nearer town than Higman's, while Catt, who was some- what in advance,, had succeded in reaching the latter, and came back with the news that the house was empty.

Thinking Mrs. Higman had taken her children into town, the party attempted to make their way back to the shelter of the Q.N. Bank ; but, after somo six or seven attempts, this was found to be impossible, and they had to remain standing for nearly an hour in the scant shelter afforded by a portion of a stone wall and a water tank. With some anxiety they waited for a lull in the storm, which came at last, and aftor a severe struggle tho bank was reached. During this time others had been busy in assisting and rescuing many women and children from the lower portions of the town. To increase the terrible dangers and the misery the water was found to be rising, and many who had held on to what little shelter was left were compelled to abandon it as inch by inch and foot by foot the water rose. One family of seven, who were living on the bank of the town lagoon, had a very narrow escape. They were taken to Synnott's billiard-room, which, with the Cus tom-house and court-house, Kelly's billiard room, and the Q.N. Bank were the only places that afforded any shelter. To add to the horrors of this fearful storm the darkness of night came on, and the cyclone seemed to re- double its force as it went howling on its pas- sage of destruction. Strong men were carried by the wind, and for a time it seemed as though it were madness to attempt anything in the way of rescue, but in spite of the danger many were distinguishing themselves by their brave exertions in helping the helpless. Among the rescuers were Messrs. Agnew, Luya, Affleck, Bradloy, Tracey, Rendell, Egan, and others whose names I do not know. At the risk of being carried away by the flood or blown into the deep waters, these men weroeto bo seen carrying children, assisting women to tho several harbours of refuge.

The water was still rising, and it was found to be coming to the Custom-house, when the P. M. (Mr. Lawson), assisted by his officials, made the place as secure as circum- stances would permit, and then left to join in the work of rescue. All hope of saving pro- perty was by this time passed, and it had resolved itself into a matter of life and death. The scene in the different houses that had weathered the storm so far, and in which many of the women and children were congregated, was heartrending, and defies my powers of description. In spite of all, several brave women who appeared to be quite oblivious of their own sufferings, devoted themselves to providing comforts for the more dis- tressed ; chief among these truly sisters of mercy and charity were Mrs. Synnott and Mrs. Ferguson, who distributed clothing and blankets to the utter exclusion of their own comfort. The space between the piles under the store of Messrs. Aplin, Brown, and Co. proved a very safe and well-sheltered haven. Several mothers with their- children were con- veyed there, and remained in' comparative security during the storm. Tho tempest raged hour after hour, while the water gradually rose till it reached the end of Synnott's verandah. About 8 o'clock the wind veered round to north-east, and it is believed by many that the storm was then at its worst. Until 11 o'clock the cyclone continued with unabating violence, but it was then found that the water had ceased rising, and although the wind was still blowing very hard the worst of the danger was over, and at midnight the storm had virtually subsided.

As the morning broke, the scene of utter ruin and desolation was terrible to contem- plate. Messrs. Aplin and Brown's large store was partly unroofed, the interior fixtures on the windward side had been thrown down, and much of the stock was lying on the floor. Raff, Grahame, and Co.'s store was partially unroofed, and the stock more or less damaged. The build- ing itself is blown out of square, and will cost a good sum to put in repair. The Q.N. Bank has also suffered to a considerable extent, the veranda being partly blown away, and also some of the roofing, while the kitchen and outbuildings were thrown down and reduced to a heap of debris. Mr. Tracey's shop and the tele- graph office are both greatly damaged. Fortu- nately for us, in the early part of the storm, P. P. Agnew at great personal risk succeeded in removing the telegraph instruments to a place of safety. With one or two exceptions all the private houses in town have been demolished.

This terrible calamity will affect all, more or less, and nothing but utter ruin stares many in the face. The police-magistrate has issued blankets and rations to those applicants who are entirely destitute, while many other generous hearts have come forward to assist the sufferers. The losses in horses and stock are believed to be considerable, but at present it is impossible to arrive at anything like a correct estimate."

The storm is believed by many to have been accompanied by a tidal wave, and certainly there is much that would strengthen this theory.The water in the river rose with great rapidity, while that which submerged the plain and portion of the town was as salt as the sea. Large fish were carried inland, and since the tide has receded, numbers of cuttle and jelly fish are to be found everywhere. So far, five persons have lost their lives in town, while two perished between the town and Harris' Lake. The latter two were a carrier and his mate, en route from Burketown to Floraville with loading for Mr. Winn.

The police who discovered the bodies state there must have been 15ft. of water over the waggon. The loading, which consisted chiefly of grog, was all washed out of the wagon, and the bed of the wagon torn from the bolts and washed away.

A cutter from the Macarthur River, in charge of Captain Hepburn, was lying at the town landing at the time. She dragged her anchors, and now lies high and dry on a small hillock some distance in shore. The captain states that he had the greatest difficulty in hanging on to the boom and keeping her afloat by means of the pump. While on board he saw numbers of horses and dogs being swept past by the current. The Customs boat and a boat belonging to Messrs. Luya and Synnott both parted their painters and were taken up the river, the first being since found out on the plain in company with the ferry punt, while the latter was stove in and sunk near the town.

It is quite impossible to get anything like a correct estimate of the loss at the present time. Of the four hotels only one remains in anything like its original form, and that is Synnotts's Commercial. Although this was completely unroofed, the actual building is very little injured.

The list of persons lost is as follows;- Mrs. Higman, wife of Constable Higman, and two children; Mrs Williams, lessee of the Union Hotel; James H'Ginn, carrier, late of Thargomindah; mate of the above, name unknown; Chinese gardener, name unknown. At present six out of the seven bodies have been recovered, the only one missing being that of Mrs Higman's youngest child. Mrs Williams had been for some time lesee of the Union Hotel, and was liked and respected by all who know her. In company with her nephew, J. M'Clair, Mrs Williams remained in the house until there were only a few sheets of iron left, and the water had risen about 5ft when they attempted with the assistance of one of the boarders to reach a place of safety.

As soon as they stepped off the veranda they found the water breast high, with a very strong current running. Mrs Williams and her two supporters were carried off their feet and had some difficulty in regaining their footing. M'Clair states that his aunt at this moment lost her presence of mind, while he was seized with cramp and became helpless. His aunt then caught him by the throat when they were all again swept off their feet, and all he remembers after was seeing her carried away with a man with a black beard who appeared to be supporting her. Recovering himself a little he managed by struggling with the water to reach the Court house, when Mrs Ferguson had to lift him up the steps and out to the veranda.


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#1024876 - 28/10/2011 15:37 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Anyone still with me? Helluva read, don't you think? I wish that newspapers today wrote in the same manner. I can picture the whole thing so clearly. I think it's pretty clear the eye passed directly over Burketown, would you all agree?

Still to come....a letter detailing the discovery of Constable Higmans youngest babys body. I'll wait till later to tackle that one. Tissues ready?

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#1024883 - 28/10/2011 16:15 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
PDDave Offline
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Registered: 03/02/2007
Posts: 21
Loc: Redlynch
Fantastic read Boxsey, can't wait for more.

Makes you wonder how we would all cope not knowing what was coming until it was upon us

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#1024936 - 28/10/2011 19:32 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: PDDave]
SBT Offline
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Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Excellent work Boxey. Looks like a riveting read if you can wrap it up in novel form.
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#1024948 - 28/10/2011 20:01 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Yeah, nuh! I have neither the aptitude or the inclination to write a book.

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#1024958 - 28/10/2011 20:40 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
ROM Offline
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Registered: 29/01/2007
Posts: 6628
boxsey, from way down south, a truly marvelous but deeply moving and tragic yarn. Thank you for sharing.

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#1024961 - 28/10/2011 20:46 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: ROM]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
I'm thrilled that anyone else thinks it's worth telling :-)
I'll try and get the next chapter happening tomorrow.

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#1024968 - 28/10/2011 21:06 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Just found a photo of the Customs House taken in 1904. It is referred to throughout the newspaper articles as being one of the only surviving buildings, and many would have sheltered in it from the storm.

And....the same building now...

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#1025076 - 29/10/2011 11:59 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Back to the story.
I'm not sure when Constable JF Higman manages to leave Burketown. There is a record of him being "Transferred by order Comm. of Police: a quiet steady constable. 31.3.87. (signed) Alex Douglas, Insp."

A note in his police file also gives this detail...
"Commissioner of Police,
Con Higman is on his way down from Cooktown on escort duty and expected hourly. (signature illegible) 21/5/87
"

From those dates, it's likely he had already left Burketown by the time the body of his youngest child was found. It maybe that the letter explaining the fact had reached Brisbane before him, and that is why the Commissioner was inquiring as to his whereabouts. It's likely that Higman didn't receive the news until late in May. Nice, how they kept him working regardless, giving him escort duty on his way back.

So, here it is, the letter detailing the finding of the childs body.

"G. Division
Burketown Station
13th April 1887

Sergeant John Ferguson G.6 reports that at 8pm the 11th instant Mr J Bradley, Divisional Board Clerk reported that when up the Albert river on that afternoon the remains of a child lying amongst the drift were pointed out to him by a black-fellow. The Sergeant accompanied by Mr. Bradley proceeded to the spot yesterday. The remains were lying about 300 yards from the river bank proper and partially enveloped in a little dress which has been identified by the Sergeants wife as one worn by “Frank” the youngest child of constable Higman.
The remains lay in the course of the flood which passed over this town on the night of the 5th (?illegible) and about 3 miles from Constable Higmans cottage. The sergeant buried the remains near where found.

John Fergusan
Sergeant Ref 76:418

Sub Insper. Brannelly/Normanton

forwarded for the information of Insp. Douglas.
? Brannelly
"


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#1025080 - 29/10/2011 12:12 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
He applies for 2 weeks leave, from 28/5/87 to 10/6/87 to "visit relations".

On the 16th of June, 1887, Constable Higman applies for compensation for loss of uniform and belongings totaling 120 pounds. A note on the side grants him some compensation...but I'm not sure of the amount...would appreciate anyone deciphering it who can read old time money!

The letter reads....
"I Bris Police Depart
Petrie Terrace
Morten District
Brisbane 16/6/87

Constable J.C.F. Higman Reg No. 339 most respectfully states for the information of His Inspector that during the floods and storm that passed over Burketown on the 5th of march past, the Const. lost all his uniform clothing and most all his private property and estimates his loss at about one hundred and twenty pounds. The Const. respectfully begs to ask his Inspector if the Const. will be allowed any compensation for his uniform clothes, he being away on duty at the time of the flood and his being left nearly destitute of clothes.

JF Higman
Const
Police Department

To the Inspector of Police Brisbane"

(Notes on the letter as follows....
I will see Mr Lewis about this 29.8.87
The Commissioner" Forwarded for favorable consideration (illegible ? 16.6 ???????)


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#1025082 - 29/10/2011 12:23 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Oh, forgot to put this telegram up in order.

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#1025088 - 29/10/2011 12:39 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: PDDave]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
That sums up the info I have that is most relevant to the cyclone. If anyone stumbles across this thread that is interested in the Higman or Huckins connection, feel free to contact me. My email is the same as my forum name,boxsey at gmail.com, or PM me.

I also have Julia's death certificate (somewhere...can't put my hands on it right now). Apparently, there would be an inquest into her death held in state archives...but when I was researching over a decade ago, I decided it probably wasn't going to tell me much more than I'd already found. There is plenty more of interest in Johns Police file, but it's not relevant to the cyclone.

For anyone interested in what happened to JCF Higman, he continued in the police force until the mid 1890's. He remarried in 1888 to a woman named Alice (and my grandmother was named Alice in her honour). After leaving the police force, he became a publican at Nanango, and later in Wondai. It seems he trained/owned at least a couple of racehorses as well.
In the early 1900's, his brother (my great great grandfather) died (Edward Alfred Higman) in Orange, NSW. John Higman and his second wife Alice invited his widow Anne Jane Higman and thier 4 children (Walter Horace, Naomi, Rebecca and Hilda) to join them in Wondai. Anne became the first medical person in the area, as a Nurse and Midwife (her daughters Naomi and Rebecca followed in her footsteps and they later owned and ran the first hospital in the Gold Coast area (Sandown Private Hospital). Walter died after being shot in the head in Messines.
Hilda Higman was her youngest child, and John CF and Alice took her in to live with them, above their pub. Hilda was well loved and looked after, and later became my Great Grandmother. So, although I'm not a direct descendant of John, he had no other children after the cyclone, so I'm the closest thing to it.

I'm sure that all the family history has bored the pants off of weatherzone members....I hope you forgive me! I want it all to show up in a google search :-)
If anyone stumbles across any other info on the cyclone, (or people involved in it) please feel free to add!

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#1025102 - 29/10/2011 13:54 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Brett Guy Offline
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Registered: 05/10/2010
Posts: 5089
Loc: Bently Park, Cairns
Originally Posted By: boxsey
Anyone still with me? Helluva read, don't you think? I wish that newspapers today wrote in the same manner. I can picture the whole thing so clearly. I think it's pretty clear the eye passed directly over Burketown, would you all agree?

Still to come....a letter detailing the discovery of Constable Higmans youngest babys body. I'll wait till later to tackle that one. Tissues ready?



Actually boxey From What I have read there(bloody riveting read at that). I Would say the eye past just over the town-probably very close to the western eyewall.. My guess is the cyclone was tracking NE-SW with maybe a little kick to the west at the end.(very hard to be accurate with that though). From all reports about how long the severe winds blew it sounds as though it was a very large system. I would love to know just how big and what the central pressure was......

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#1025103 - 29/10/2011 14:02 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Brett Guy]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Anyone able to decode the pressure reading at Normanton for me? Though, it's what, at least 150-200k east of Burketown, isn't it.

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#1025116 - 29/10/2011 15:08 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Adding links to additional newspaper articles. This one has additional info about which boat brought the news to Normanton from Burketown
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/52066119?searchTerm=cyclone%20normanton%20%20&searchLimits=fromyyyy=1887|||frommm|||fromdd|||toyyyy=1887|||tomm|||todd

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#1025118 - 29/10/2011 15:10 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
!SCHUMMY! Offline
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Registered: 22/04/2008
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Loc: Jimboomba, SEQ
WOW what a great read boxsey! thanks for compiling this and sharing it with us all, made me feel like i was there it is soo detailed! well done smile

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#1025122 - 29/10/2011 15:15 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: !SCHUMMY!]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
thanks! makes me feel like the effort was worth it!

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#1025136 - 29/10/2011 16:21 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Brett Guy]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
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Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Originally Posted By: Brett Guy
Originally Posted By: boxsey
I think it's pretty clear the eye passed directly over Burketown, would you all agree?




Actually boxey From What I have read there(bloody riveting read at that). I Would say the eye past just over the town-probably very close to the western eyewall.. My guess is the cyclone was tracking NE-SW with maybe a little kick to the west at the end.(very hard to be accurate with that though). From all reports about how long the severe winds blew it sounds as though it was a very large system. I would love to know just how big and what the central pressure was......


I think it was pretty bloody big. As earlier in the thread, we allready know there was a gale at normanton, suffiencent to lose markers and pilot boats etc....and, just for you....look what I found....

From the "North Australian" (Darwin, April 2nd)
On tho 5th of last month, Burketown, in the Gulf of Carpentaria, was visited by " something like a cyclone and tidal wave" [i]and it is just probable that the remarkable high water and stiff blow which occurred here about the sama time were in some way connected with the destructive visitor to the other side of the Gulf. The fun appears to have lasted 12 hours, and by the end of that time every building in town was wrecked, excepting two invaluable institutions-the Custom House and Court House.[/i](continues with word for word stuff we've read in other papers)

(is that possible????)


Edited by boxsey (29/10/2011 16:22)

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#1025140 - 29/10/2011 16:50 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Brett Guy Offline
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Registered: 05/10/2010
Posts: 5089
Loc: Bently Park, Cairns
Certainly is possible, although a cyclone of massive diameter I would think would be unusual in the gulf due to it's confined area. However depending on the actual direction the system was travelling it may also have been very slow moving and perhaps tracking from ENE to WSW thereby giving Normanton a passing blow on it's way to hit Burktown head on. As others have said though, we will never know for sure.

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#1025144 - 29/10/2011 16:56 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
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Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Sounds to me like a mid to high range Cat 2 at the very least with the Tidal Wave (Storm Surge of the height mentioned). You can't really tell from teh desriptions of teh damage to buildings but to my mind you would need a blow of at least cat 2 or higher to get that much water pushed up the river etc.

Excellent work Boxey. Could have the makings of a good historical novel. I know you don't want to write it but maybe you could get an Australian author interested in it.
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#1025289 - 30/10/2011 07:13 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Ted was a 4 when he crossed and I think he had a tidal surge too, but it wasn't as high as the 1887 one. I guess the tide would have a lot to do with that...though, the gulf often only has one tide in and out a day. Or less.
I wonder if it came from the top end and down...then it would account for the stuff darwin had?

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#1025301 - 30/10/2011 08:43 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
FNQ Bunyip Offline
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Registered: 31/12/2004
Posts: 1444
Loc: North bank river Daintree
this has been a great read smile
But with nothing weather wise on the horizon, what the hell are we going to do next week? ..Lol

You got any more family connections to past weather events to research Boxey ?

Cheers
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#1025430 - 30/10/2011 15:13 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: FNQ Bunyip]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
LOL, not that I know of....but then, I didn't know of this either until I noticed the three of them on the register having died the same day. I assumed they'd been murdered or something.....got the death cert...which mentioned the flood and Burketown....and away I went!

You just never know what you will turn up :-).

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#1043731 - 15/12/2011 08:51 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
stormy_bec Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 05/11/2009
Posts: 328
Loc: Kimberley Station Qld
Thanks boxsey for the fascinating read. Even the family history. I live in wondai. So the link is there for me too. Keep writing as you are an amazing researcher and writer.

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#1094581 - 22/03/2012 09:06 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: PDDave]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Just read a police report on facebook that says the Burketown Pub has been destroyed by fire, and that it is suspicious. Terrible news.

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#1094599 - 22/03/2012 10:03 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Bugger thats no good Boxey. That place is central to the Burketown Cyclone history.
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#1094641 - 22/03/2012 12:06 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
boxsey Offline
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Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Also central to the courting history of myself and my now husband! Devastating!

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#1094650 - 22/03/2012 12:54 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Majors Daughter Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 17/03/2010
Posts: 23
Loc: Mysterton Townsville
Hi Boxsey, I Have been a member of this forum for three years and only posted three times in that period (always reading it though :)). I could not sit here idly without telling you that your research and written recount is amazing, gripping and I look forward to reading more on your discoveries. I agree with SBT...would make a great novel!
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#1094720 - 22/03/2012 17:33 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Majors Daughter]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Glad you enjoyed it Majors Daughter! I love history and weather...and they collided here in an amazing way.

A sad site...the burnt out remains of the Burketown Pub.

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#1094959 - 23/03/2012 01:01 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
TC Qotsa Offline
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Registered: 01/02/2011
Posts: 83
Loc: Kirwan
I just discovered this thread Boxsey. That was an excellent read, it's a shame that the pub has been burnt down though. Do you think any of it will be salvageable?

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#1095023 - 23/03/2012 10:41 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: TC Qotsa]
LightningLucy Offline
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Registered: 29/04/2011
Posts: 1
Loc: east of ipswich
hi,what an interesting read..thankyou.My sister works/worked behind the bar at the pub and yeah it is such a shame its now gone.
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#1095364 - 24/03/2012 14:22 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: LightningLucy]
Gordon Bennett Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2006
Posts: 1371
Loc: Port Moresby.
What a sad ending to the story. Thank you for sharing Boxsey, I had some work to do in the garden and I thought I would just take a quick look at the WZ forum, and what a gem of a story. Even got a cold beer out for the longer newspaper article!

Cheers!
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#1095367 - 24/03/2012 14:30 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Dawgggg]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Trav, just saw this from a few pages back. LOL'ing to myself...because your family knows my family, and I didn't realise that at the time you wrote it. See if you can work out the connection...perhaps ask your dad! I believe you have even been to my house.....

Originally Posted By: OzCyChaser Trav
Wow boxesy, myself having lived in Normanton for a few years and making lots of trips to burketown over the years, I really am interested in this thread. It's almost like a personal thing to be reading about what had happened to those towns.

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#1095400 - 24/03/2012 16:43 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Brett Guy]
Maisie Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 21/03/2004
Posts: 1515
Loc: Bluewater Park,Nth of Townsvil...
Hi Boxsey
The compensation paid looks to be 76 pound 6 shillings which is equal to $168.20 Australian Dollars.
I am very involved in Family History and have seen this type of money information before.

That was a LOT of money back then.
Even though he asked for more compensation this amount is huge for 1887.

Plus I am old enough to remember pre decimal money.

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#1095401 - 24/03/2012 16:47 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Maisie]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Thanks Maisie...he did ask for 120 pounds, so 76 pounds is probably correct. I thought it was 6, which would have been pretty measly.

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#1095712 - 25/03/2012 19:58 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Maisie Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 21/03/2004
Posts: 1515
Loc: Bluewater Park,Nth of Townsvil...
Hi Boxsey
When I did my conversion yesterday I was on my way out, after reviewing it with more time the conversion would be 76 Pounds 6 Shillings = $183.12 not as above. Based on the conversion of the Pound in the 1880,s to the current Aussie Dollar.

Sorry for the wrong info

Just for anyone interested the Pounds, Shillings and Pence of our pre 1966 currency is calculated in 12,s not 10,s as our current dollar is.


Edited by Maisie (25/03/2012 20:01)

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#1095713 - 25/03/2012 20:00 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Maisie]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
No worries Maisie! You were still close. It'd be interesting to know how many loaves of bread or some other thing like that it would buy....to make it more meaningful, kwim?

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#1095716 - 25/03/2012 20:05 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Maisie Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 21/03/2004
Posts: 1515
Loc: Bluewater Park,Nth of Townsvil...
It wouldnt be much now but a lot then,probably only tuppence which to those who don't know is equal to 2c and that would have been a lot of money.
Even when I married in 1967, my husband worked in a mill 6 days for a wage of $45 dollars so even since then its a lot different. Bottle of milk 20c.

I will do some research about it.
Actually already found it, a loaf of bread in 1901 in Australia cost tuppence, equal to about a dollar today.


Edited by Maisie (25/03/2012 20:09)

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#1095725 - 25/03/2012 20:20 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Maisie]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
I did a calculation (50(loaves of bread a dollar would buy)x 183(his payment) x$2.50 (conservative average price for a loaf of bread today) to come up with $22875 as being a rough estimate of what it might have been in today's money.

It would, I assume, be enough for a now single man to re-establish himself of clothes and basic possessions quite well (given he still is employed, and would probably have police lodgings). Still, no price on losing your wife and kids, is there. Not enough to buy a pub with....he later became a publican, but I'm not sure that he owned it, or was just the proprietor.

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#1095728 - 25/03/2012 20:33 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Maisie Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 21/03/2004
Posts: 1515
Loc: Bluewater Park,Nth of Townsvil...
Very interesting story,especially for someone like me who is very much into family history. You should write down something about the story,especially if its family related. A great thing for future generations to have. I am doing that for my family about my Grandfather. Military Man and English. Lots of skeletons but its his story and I can see your ancestor, if thats what he is has a very interesting story as well.
Family history is always full of heartache, surprise, revelations of unknown things some good, some not so good, but its fascinating to watch it unfold and you certainly have a good start to this story. And they are our family and that is their life.
I have never written before but doing mine on a site called Blurb. You write it as you feel like it,add photos or certificates and letters and its published by them and sent to you finished.

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#1095747 - 25/03/2012 21:39 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Maisie]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
I printed out this thread...does that count? I did a lot of my family history in the 90's, before the internet took off. I did input the bare details into FTM some years ago, but I have so much more than that...and no time now I have the kidlets. It's all filed though, so that's something.
This bloke was my g.g.uncle. He had no other kids, and, raised my great grandmother...so is as close to being my ancestor as you can get, I guess.
Blurb sounds interesting, will check out. With the interwebs now, you can find out SO much more, so quickly. Amazing.

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#1095788 - 25/03/2012 23:52 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Maisie Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 21/03/2004
Posts: 1515
Loc: Bluewater Park,Nth of Townsvil...
It doesn,t matter Boxsey how long it takes,I have been doing it for more than 20years, as long as you keep all the info somewhere and when time permits you can always go back to it later. He is certainly an ancestor with an interesting story, something your children and grandchildren would love to read in many years to come.

My Grandfather was in 3 wars ( Boer War as a 15yr old with British Army) WW1 and WW2 (Aussie Army)so he has a long Military History and with a son also in the Military of course it is very important for him to have this story to keep.
Anyway wont go on anymore, this is your thread not mine,but I have enjoyed the trip.

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#1097083 - 01/04/2012 02:55 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: Maisie]
sixties Offline
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Registered: 22/12/2009
Posts: 130
Loc: Cabooltrue North
i must say that was a really interesting read so i thought i's have a little bit of a further look for more information on this event and found this
dated 15/3/1887

CYCLONE IN THE GULF.
Burketown Destroyed and Seven Lives Lost
Further Particulars
The Colonial Treasurer has received further particulars of tho ccyclone from Mr. A. C. Lawson, P.M. and Sub-collector of Customs, of Burketown. The wires in the neighbourhood of Burketown were all destroyed, and Mr. Lawson was obliged to send his message to Kimberly by Mr. Cullen, Marine Survoyor. Mr. Cullen visited the town, and also reported to the Colonial Treasurer that it had been
nearly destroyed by the gale on the 5th in- stant. Mr. Lawson's telegram, dated 11 th instant, is as follows :
On Saturday afternoon, the fith instant, a terric cyclone, accompanied by heavy rain, passed over Burketown. The gale lasted for ten hours. Nearly all the buildings in the place were either unroofed or blown down, excepting the Custom-house and court- house, which are not very much damaged. I have provided destitute families with temporary accommodation in these build- ings. The river overflowed its banks and submerged a portion of tho town, the water being about 1ft. over the floor of the Custom-house. Mrs. Catherine Williams, Mrs. Higman and two children, James M'Ginn, a carrier, and his mate, whos name is unknown, and also a Chinaman were drowned. The wator has now subsided. The post and tele- graph office was unroofed. The books were destroyed; the mails and instruments wore, how- ever, sived but damaged. The telegraph line was completely destroyed as far as its route can be travelled. The repairers are now re connecting the same in the town. At the court- house, lands office and Customs office, the books and records are intact, but the stationery and forms are somewhat damaged. The Divi- sional Board books and property were damaged to a serious extent. The boatman's cottage and outbuildings at the Custom-house, were blown down, and the boat carried away. Heavy losses in horses and stock are also re- ported.
, (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDANT.)
(By Electric Telegraph)
Burketown (Via Normanton), March 11.
On Saturday morning at 10 o'clock a terrific cyclone commenced blowing, accompanied by heavy rain, from the south-east, which gradually increased in violence up to about 2 o'clock, when tho most fearful destruction commenced. Tho river rose 2ft. in half-an
hour, and ultimately reached a height of
8ft. above tho summer level. The storm continued for twelve hour. Every building in town was more or less destroyed except the Customs and court-house Somo buildings were completely wrecked. The men turned out and endeavoured to save life, but in spite of all efforts two women, two children, and a Chinaman perished. The loss of horses and stock is very groat. Telegraph posts were snapped like glass, and the whole of the line totally destroyed, as far as it is possible to travel along it. The post and telegraph office is wrecked, but the instruments and mails wero saved by the post- master at great personal risk. Many destitute families have been succoured by the police magistrate and sergeant of police, ably assisted by his wife. Great hospitality was shown to many sufferers by the manager of the Q.N. Bank assisted by the postmaster. Many business people have been hopelessly ruined. The loss to Messrs. Aplin, Brown, and Co. is variously estimated at from £12,000 to £20,000. Two men perished on the road while travelling with
teams.
A very narrow escape from the drowning of a party of engineers in one of the sewers of the city is stated by our (Argus) Dunedin corre- spondent to have happened there on 3rd March : -A very heavy fall of rain, which was accompanied by distant thunder, took place in the afternoon. Mr. Miram, the city engineer, Mr. Cuthbert, C.E., of Christchurch, Mr. R. Hay, O.E., and a corporation employé named Sandilands, went into tho main sewer to inspect it in connection with a lawsuit brought by Messrs. Sargood, Son, and Ewen against the corporation, arising out of recent floods, and before the man on the look-out could give them warning a tremendous down- pour of rain commenced. In a few seconds an immense body of water was fimding its way into the sewer from the hills, and this reached the party in the Sewer while they were about 200 yards from a man- hole. The water rose from a few inches to about 5ft. It was with the utmost diffi- culty that the party kept themselves from being swept off their feet by the rushing water, and they were becoming weaker and weaker for want of air, which had no room to circulate. They stuck together, and by cling- ing to the top and sides they managed to hold on till a manhole was reached. A final effort prevented their being swept past, and they, clambering on the shoulders of others, managed to get out in a pitiable plight. They received many severe bruises, and were thorougldy ex- hausted. No dangerous results are anticipated. Sandilands suffered most. He is a short man, and the water was up to his chin. Mr. Hay i managed time after time to keep him from being swept away.
______________________________________________________________

however i will also post the link for this as there is some other really valabule information to help peice together this puzzle
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/3464917
now the information i'm refering to is tothe right of this article under the title Queensland news full artale here http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/3464912
but to summerise

MARYBOROUGH, March 14.
The Flood Relief G'onunitteo has decided to forward tho remaining £300 to the Central Committeo, mid with a request that £100 bo placed to tho credit of tho Malborough committee, to meet local distress occasioned hy-
the recent flood.
A rainfall of 3in. was registered hero last night. The rain has now ceased, and tho river has oidy rison slightly.
A man named James Collins has been com- mitted for trial on tho chargo of having com-
mitted an unnatural offence
RICHMOND, March 14.
Sevonty-nino points of rain fell on the 11th instant, 3G points on tho I2th, and l8 points, on tlio lath instant. The weather is threaten- ing for moro rain, and tho Flinders is running
a banker.
BUNDABERG, March 14.
Tremendous rain fell and half a hurricane prevailed during the greater part of labt îdght. llie creeks in the vicinity of tho town quickly roso in a violent current that submerged the bridges, thereby blocking traffic. The wind then changed from south-east to east and north-east, earrj'ing perfect sheets of water with it. The rainfall, as given officially, is 5'87in.; but rain gauges in other positions givo G'öOin. Much damage has been done to bridges, approaches, &c.Fix this text

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#1097148 - 01/04/2012 12:34 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: sixties]
curious onlooker Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 26/01/2011
Posts: 447
Loc: Annandale - Townsville
hey all, just found this thread and have totally been engrossed in the last 12 pages I have read!

Fantastic work there boxsey it really paints a picture, you couldn't even start to imagine how tough it would have been back then. To think what Mrs Higman went through with her 2 children would have been horific and the torment of losing your family like that.
_________________________
Bring on the rains!!!

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#1097181 - 01/04/2012 15:26 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: curious onlooker]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/ I inputed the £76 for 1859 and got http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/result.php

Gives you a result on what £76 in 1859 to present day (2010) £46,300.00

So for average earnings it would equate in todays money as £46,300.00 or convereted to AUD it would be $71,268.20 in todays money. No where near enough to buy a house or even build one but more than enough to buy replacement clothes furniture etc.
_________________________
April 15mm
2018 Total 737mm






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#1097187 - 01/04/2012 15:52 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: sixties]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Originally Posted By: sixties
i must say that was a really interesting read so i thought i's have a little bit of a further look for more information on this event and found this
dated 15/3/1887

CYCLONE IN THE GULF.
Burketown Destroyed and Seven Lives Lost
Further Particulars
The Colonial Treasurer has received further particulars of tho ccyclone from Mr. A. C. Lawson, P.M. and Sub-collector of Customs, of Burketown. The wires in the neighbourhood of Burketown were all destroyed, and Mr. Lawson was obliged to send his message to Kimberly by Mr. Cullen, Marine Survoyor. Mr. Cullen visited the town, and also reported to the Colonial Treasurer that it had been
nearly destroyed by the gale on the 5th in- stant. Mr. Lawson's telegram, dated 11 th instant, is as follows :
On Saturday afternoon, the fith instant, a terric cyclone, accompanied by heavy rain, passed over Burketown. The gale lasted for ten hours. Nearly all the buildings in the place were either unroofed or blown down, excepting the Custom-house and court- house, which are not very much damaged. I have provided destitute families with temporary accommodation in these build- ings. The river overflowed its banks and submerged a portion of tho town, the water being about 1ft. over the floor of the Custom-house. Mrs. Catherine Williams, Mrs. Higman and two children, James M'Ginn, a carrier, and his mate, whos name is unknown, and also a Chinaman were drowned. The wator has now subsided. The post and tele- graph office was unroofed. The books were destroyed; the mails and instruments wore, how- ever, sived but damaged. The telegraph line was completely destroyed as far as its route can be travelled. The repairers are now re connecting the same in the town. At the court- house, lands office and Customs office, the books and records are intact, but the stationery and forms are somewhat damaged. The Divi- sional Board books and property were damaged to a serious extent. The boatman's cottage and outbuildings at the Custom-house, were blown down, and the boat carried away. Heavy losses in horses and stock are also re- ported.
, (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDANT.)
(By Electric Telegraph)
Burketown (Via Normanton), March 11.
On Saturday morning at 10 o'clock a terrific cyclone commenced blowing, accompanied by heavy rain, from the south-east, which gradually increased in violence up to about 2 o'clock, when tho most fearful destruction commenced. Tho river rose 2ft. in half-an
hour, and ultimately reached a height of
8ft. above tho summer level. The storm continued for twelve hour. Every building in town was more or less destroyed except the Customs and court-house Somo buildings were completely wrecked. The men turned out and endeavoured to save life, but in spite of all efforts two women, two children, and a Chinaman perished. The loss of horses and stock is very groat. Telegraph posts were snapped like glass, and the whole of the line totally destroyed, as far as it is possible to travel along it. The post and telegraph office is wrecked, but the instruments and mails wero saved by the post- master at great personal risk. Many destitute families have been succoured by the police magistrate and sergeant of police, ably assisted by his wife. Great hospitality was shown to many sufferers by the manager of the Q.N. Bank assisted by the postmaster. Many business people have been hopelessly ruined. The loss to Messrs. Aplin, Brown, and Co. is variously estimated at from £12,000 to £20,000. Two men perished on the road while travelling with
teams.
A very narrow escape from the drowning of a party of engineers in one of the sewers of the city is stated by our (Argus) Dunedin corre- spondent to have happened there on 3rd March : -A very heavy fall of rain, which was accompanied by distant thunder, took place in the afternoon. Mr. Miram, the city engineer, Mr. Cuthbert, C.E., of Christchurch, Mr. R. Hay, O.E., and a corporation employé named Sandilands, went into tho main sewer to inspect it in connection with a lawsuit brought by Messrs. Sargood, Son, and Ewen against the corporation, arising out of recent floods, and before the man on the look-out could give them warning a tremendous down- pour of rain commenced. In a few seconds an immense body of water was fimding its way into the sewer from the hills, and this reached the party in the Sewer while they were about 200 yards from a man- hole. The water rose from a few inches to about 5ft. It was with the utmost diffi- culty that the party kept themselves from being swept off their feet by the rushing water, and they were becoming weaker and weaker for want of air, which had no room to circulate. They stuck together, and by cling- ing to the top and sides they managed to hold on till a manhole was reached. A final effort prevented their being swept past, and they, clambering on the shoulders of others, managed to get out in a pitiable plight. They received many severe bruises, and were thorougldy ex- hausted. No dangerous results are anticipated. Sandilands suffered most. He is a short man, and the water was up to his chin. Mr. Hay i managed time after time to keep him from being swept away.
______________________________________________________________

however i will also post the link for this as there is some other really valabule information to help peice together this puzzle
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/3464917
now the information i'm refering to is tothe right of this article under the title Queensland news full artale here http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/3464912
but to summerise

MARYBOROUGH, March 14.
The Flood Relief G'onunitteo has decided to forward tho remaining £300 to the Central Committeo, mid with a request that £100 bo placed to tho credit of tho Malborough committee, to meet local distress occasioned hy-
the recent flood.
A rainfall of 3in. was registered hero last night. The rain has now ceased, and tho river has oidy rison slightly.
A man named James Collins has been com- mitted for trial on tho chargo of having com-
mitted an unnatural offence
RICHMOND, March 14.
Sevonty-nino points of rain fell on the 11th instant, 3G points on tho I2th, and l8 points, on tlio lath instant. The weather is threaten- ing for moro rain, and tho Flinders is running
a banker.
BUNDABERG, March 14.
Tremendous rain fell and half a hurricane prevailed during the greater part of labt îdght. llie creeks in the vicinity of tho town quickly roso in a violent current that submerged the bridges, thereby blocking traffic. The wind then changed from south-east to east and north-east, earrj'ing perfect sheets of water with it. The rainfall, as given officially, is 5'87in.; but rain gauges in other positions givo G'öOin. Much damage has been done to bridges, approaches, &c.Fix this text

Thanks for the extra info! The Engineers in the Sewer is a different event I think...it looks like it happened in Dunedin (those old newspapers seem to run articles together!).
Do you think the flooding in Richmond/Maryborough/Bunderberg were related to the Burketown Cyclone? These old newspaper reports are sometimes dodgy with dates....so I guess it could be. It hit Burketown on the 5th....and the newspaper reports the weather on the 14th...but that might be the date they recieved the report, and it happened days earlier. Hard to work out.

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#1097189 - 01/04/2012 15:53 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Originally Posted By: Sir BoabTree
http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/ I inputed the £76 for 1859 and got http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/result.php

Gives you a result on what £76 in 1859 to present day (2010) £46,300.00

So for average earnings it would equate in todays money as £46,300.00 or convereted to AUD it would be $71,268.20 in todays money. No where near enough to buy a house or even build one but more than enough to buy replacement clothes furniture etc.

That's a useful tool SBT. Yeah, enough to start a new life, given he had a income, and probably police quarters to live in. Hardly compensation for losing your family though.

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#1097190 - 01/04/2012 15:54 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Also, thanks for everyone's kind words! Glad you enjoyed the read. I think the personal angle often makes such events so much more meaningful than bland descriptions on the BOM site.

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#1097239 - 01/04/2012 19:12 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Boxey, you are right about teh articles running together, the engineers where in Dunedin New Zealand and had nothing to do with the Burketown Cyclone.
_________________________
April 15mm
2018 Total 737mm






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#1100667 - 22/04/2012 11:21 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: SBT]
mickedmoo Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 28/10/2010
Posts: 44
Loc: Kununurra WA
Fantastic work Boxsey! Need more of this stuff to keep me occupied through the dry season! crazy

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#1100777 - 22/04/2012 23:08 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: mickedmoo]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14218
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Curse you Boxey. I keep going back to Trove like a moth to a flame and I am addicted now.

2450 text edits 1269 this month alone.

Mostly on aboriginal murders in NT/QLD (whites killing aborigines are way out numbered by aboriginals killing their own) but some are also linked to Burketown long after the cyclone though and my wifes family from around Kingaroy who didn't kill any aboriginals but the tone of the news articles would make a Politically Correct Numptee turn cartwheels of faux embarrasment.
_________________________
April 15mm
2018 Total 737mm






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#1297025 - 07/01/2015 20:50 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Not sure where to put this so putting it in here. Found it while doing a new search to see if I could find any new stuff on the cyclone. Seems as this fancy new chart commenced in the same year the cyclone hit.

1887 'NEW WEATHER CHART OF AUSTRALASIA.', The Inquirer and Commercial News (Perth, WA : 1855 - 1901), 5 October, p. 5, viewed 7 January, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66082406

NEW WEATHER CHART OF AUSTRALASIA.

Impressed with the great importance of studying atmospheric and climatic phenomena — not only in the cause of science but practically for the benefit of agricultural, pastoral, shipping, and general interests — the Government of Queensland established in January last a Meteorological Office, forming a branch of tbe Post and Telegraph Department of the Colony, under the direc tion of the Hon. T. Macdonald-Paterson, then Postmaster-GeneraL Mr. Clement L. Wragge, F.R.G.S., &c, who established the

well -Known Ben Mevis observatory, was placed in charge as Government Meteorol-. ogist ; and he based his plan of action on the linesof the Meteorological Office, London, and Chief Signal Office, Washington, forth with commencing to organise new Observing Stations in strict accordance with the most approved principles. . A system, of weather warnings and forecasts was in contemplation no less than acquiring data sufficient to elucidate the nature and peculiarities of the local climates of all parts of the Colony. In order to correctly interpret the pheno mena of Queensland weather, he also arranged

the other Colonies, induding Western Australia, the Northern Territory, Tas mania, and New Zealand should be telegra phed daily to Brisbane, and from information thus obtained a Small Weather Chart was published daily showing the march of changes across the Australian Continent. So rapidly did the system develop that although other observatories in Queensland have yet to be established, the data plotted on the Chart enabled the new Office to issue frequent forecasts of value to the country. During a recent visit to his colleagues at the observatories of the southern Colonies, Mr. Wragge arranged for the wiring of additional data from all quarters of Australia. A new Chart was afterwards prepared, three times the size of the former one, so as te contain this in creased information, and is now published regularly at the Post and Telegraph Office, Brisbane. On it are plotted the isobars, or lines of equal atmospheric pressure, and the course of the winds depending on that pres sure; regions of barometic disturbances are clearly shown, so are the amounts of cloud and areas of clear sky, shade tem- peratures, percentages 'of humidity, quan-

tities of rainfall, condition of the sea and other information. Towns from Western Australia to Queensland and New Zealand, and from the Northern Territory to Tas- mania are conditions of weather graphically shown each day; and farmers, ship-masters, and others interested can readily under- stand the character of the changes affecting a given district. By an advertisement in another column it will be notified that a copy of the enlarged Chart will be posted daily (except Sundays and holidays) to any address in the Australian Colonies for a subscription of (pound symbol)2 2s. per annum.

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#1297027 - 07/01/2015 20:53 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
And, an example of this new fangled chart.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/static/ndp/tmpIm...33194-3-001.jpg

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#1297028 - 07/01/2015 20:55 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
[img]http://http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/printArticleJpg/7933194/3?print=n[/img]


Edited by Mick10 (07/01/2015 21:50)

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#1297058 - 07/01/2015 21:52 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Mick10 Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 02/11/2001
Posts: 25272
Loc: Kirwan, Townsville - NQld.
hi boxsey, I have attempted to fix your link, but it doesn't work. I can find it on the net.
_________________________
Kirwan, Townsville Nth Qld -
March 2018 total - 296mm (194mm)
April 2018 total - 12.4mm (66mm)
2018 Yearly total to date - 794.4mm (1107mm)

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#1297059 - 07/01/2015 21:58 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
The first one or the second one? The first works for me. Let me see if I can find it again.

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#1297061 - 07/01/2015 22:01 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Nope, can't remember how I found it. It was a cool looking old chart.

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#1297097 - 07/01/2015 22:44 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Mick10 Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 02/11/2001
Posts: 25272
Loc: Kirwan, Townsville - NQld.
nah sorry mate cant get either to work. can get the webpage you linked ok but just not the pics sorry.
_________________________
Kirwan, Townsville Nth Qld -
March 2018 total - 296mm (194mm)
April 2018 total - 12.4mm (66mm)
2018 Yearly total to date - 794.4mm (1107mm)

Top
#1297104 - 07/01/2015 22:56 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Raindammit Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 14/02/2002
Posts: 12960
Loc: Townsville & Bilyana NQ
Raindammit to the rescue!!



_________________________
Belgian Gardens, Townsville NQ
Bilyana FNQ

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#1297109 - 07/01/2015 23:07 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Nerd65 Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 30/01/2011
Posts: 423
Loc: Cranbrook, Townsville
Worked it out. This is the working link to the article:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/7933194

This is the weather chart:

_________________________
Linux is Star Trek; Windows is Star Wars.

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#1297112 - 07/01/2015 23:12 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Nerd65 Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 30/01/2011
Posts: 423
Loc: Cranbrook, Townsville
Beat me to it RD... I was still working it out while you were posting.
_________________________
Linux is Star Trek; Windows is Star Wars.

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#1297174 - 08/01/2015 08:08 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Mick10 Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 02/11/2001
Posts: 25272
Loc: Kirwan, Townsville - NQld.
still not working for me, showing it as a black cross with a http error. must be my computer.
_________________________
Kirwan, Townsville Nth Qld -
March 2018 total - 296mm (194mm)
April 2018 total - 12.4mm (66mm)
2018 Yearly total to date - 794.4mm (1107mm)

Top
#1297183 - 08/01/2015 08:37 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Me too Mick.

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#1297201 - 08/01/2015 09:25 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Raindammit Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 14/02/2002
Posts: 12960
Loc: Townsville & Bilyana NQ
I re-edited the post - is it working now?
_________________________
Belgian Gardens, Townsville NQ
Bilyana FNQ

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#1297220 - 08/01/2015 09:54 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
Mick10 Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 02/11/2001
Posts: 25272
Loc: Kirwan, Townsville - NQld.
yep working now, thanks mate.
_________________________
Kirwan, Townsville Nth Qld -
March 2018 total - 296mm (194mm)
April 2018 total - 12.4mm (66mm)
2018 Yearly total to date - 794.4mm (1107mm)

Top
#1458582 - 23/03/2018 17:15 Re: Burketown Cyclone 1887 [Re: boxsey]
boxsey Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 13/02/2011
Posts: 371
Loc: Aitkenvale, Townsville
Bumping this thread just in case anyone is interested in previous Gulf Cyclones that missed it the first time around.

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