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#1119435 - 10/08/2012 20:24 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: Anthony Violi]
Anthony Violi Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 06/11/2001
Posts: 2320
Loc: Soon to be Mt Barker - SA
Whats wrong Ceebee, you the only one allowed to say why dont you admit this and why dont you admit that?
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#1119438 - 10/08/2012 20:37 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: Anthony Violi]
CeeBee Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 25/02/2012
Posts: 2637
Drought 2012 Grows Worse

The drought disaster in the nation's Heartland continues to worsen, even as spotty rainfall slightly cut a small sliver into the total extent of drought, according to the weekly U.S. Drought Monitor report released Thursday morning.

Overall, the total extent of all drought categories (levels 1 through 4) remains around 62.5% of the Lower 48 States this week. Parts of all of 39 states, including Hawaii, are in some level of drought.

"Extreme" to "exceptional" drought – the two highest levels on the Drought Monitor scale – covers 24% of the area of the Lower 48 States, up from 22% one week ago.

The drought report comes on the heels of a NOAA report Wednesday saying July 2012 was the single hottest calendar month on record for the Lower 48 States, dating to 1895.

The authors of the Drought Monitor wrote this week: "Reports of water-related impacts are ticking upward with each passing week as mandatory restrictions continue to ramp upward. As the drought continues, this will undoubtedly become a more prevalent issue as the agriculture season passes and attention turns to next year's crops or herds."

State Highlights

Areal extent of "exceptional drought", the worst drought category in the drought monitor report, continues to grow. Some states in this highest-impact category include...

Over half of Arkansas (53%), including the city of Little Rock
Over one-third of Kansas (39%), in western and east-central parts of the state.
One-quarter of Indiana (25%), including Evansville and Terre Haute.
Almost one-quarter of Georgia (24%), including Macon and Augusta.

Any Recent Rain Relief?

Through the first 8 days of August, spotty 1"+ rainfall was reported from the northern Plains to the mid-Mississippi and Ohio Valleys to the Southeast. Among the cities picking up this beneficial rainfall were...

- Evansville, Ind. (2.72")

- Macon, Ga. (1.59")

- Omaha, Neb. (1.26")

- Grand Forks, N.D. (1.15")

However, large swaths of the Great Plains, High Plains, and Rockies have received little rainfall so far in August.

How Much Rain is Needed?

According to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, at least 12" of rain is needed fully quench the drought in the following areas:

- Ohio Valley: southwest Ind., western Ky., central/southern Ill., part of east-central Ohio

- Missouri Valley/Ozarks: All of Ark., most of Missouri, south-central Iowa

- Plains: northwest Texas, eastern Oklahoma, eastern Kansas, northeast Neb., S.D. Black Hills, northeast Wyo.

- Parts of East: Middle/southwest Ga., southern Md., southern Del.

What Would it Take to Break the Drought?

With average monthly precipitation in August and September generally ranging from 1.5 to over 4 inches in many of these areas, it may take months to fully wipe out the Drought of 2012.

http://www.weather.com/news/drought-update-20120809



http://www.weather.com/maps/maptype/currentweatherusnational/uscurrentweather_large.html
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#1119443 - 10/08/2012 21:00 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: CeeBee]
crikey Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 01/02/2011
Posts: 2586
Loc: Tweed Heads
Isn't it amazing that when you look at the 1934 drought map, the drought in 1934 look more severe because the colors chosen are bright red/ burnt orange
where as the 2012 drought map uses much less severe color giving the impression of less severity..
or at least that's how the mind reacts to those color comparisons..
Wouldn't it be great if there was some sort of uniformity so you didn't have to work so hard to determine which was the worst drought.!!
and so NOAA changes its color scheme..sigh!

In 1934 American drought the PDO and AMO were in a positive phase
but in the 2012 American drought
the PDO and AMO are tending negative?
Not what you might expect really

Which natural oscillation phase is common to both droughts?
A quick look and l can't find much except...?


and that is the Arctic temperature fluctuation cycle?
posted below
The Artic temp anomaly peaked in 1934 at positive 0.9 and
coincided with the American drought
The Arctic temp anomaly is also running at a peak/high anomaly of..around 0.85 in 2012 and also coincides with the next subsequent American major drought

http://www.climate4you.com/Polar%20tempe...orth%20of%2070N

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#1119445 - 10/08/2012 21:02 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: crikey]
Anthony Violi Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 06/11/2001
Posts: 2320
Loc: Soon to be Mt Barker - SA
Isnt it funny how that graph correlates so well to ENSO crikey, and the PDO cycle?

If you look at unadjusted data its almost a perfect match.
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#1119447 - 10/08/2012 21:05 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: crikey]
Lightning....Lee Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 02/03/2011
Posts: 328
Originally Posted By: crikey
Isn't it amazing that when you look at the 1934 drought map, the drought in 1934 look more severe because the colors chosen are bright red/ burnt orange
where as the 2012 drought map uses much less severe color giving the impression of less severity..
or at least that's how the mind reacts to those color comparisons..
Wouldn't it be great if there was some sort of uniformity so you didn't have to work so hard to determine which was the worst drought.!!
and so NOAA changes its color scheme..sigh!

In 1934 American drought the PDO and AMO were in a positive phase
but in the 2012 American drought
the PDO and AMO are tending negative?
Not what you might expect really

Which natural oscillation phase is common to both droughts?
A quick look and l can't find much except...?


and that is the Arctic temperature fluctuation cycle?
posted below
The Artic temp anomaly peaked in 1934 at positive 0.9 and
coincided with the American drought
The Arctic temp anomaly is also running at a peak/high anomaly of..around 0.85 in 2012 and also coincides with the next subsequent American major drought

http://www.climate4you.com/Polar%20tempe...orth%20of%2070N




That's some very nice weather forensics there crikey! Awesome job mate, you've taught me something new today and that's a hard job... cos me no learn well! wink

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#1119458 - 10/08/2012 22:06 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: crikey]
crikey Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 01/02/2011
Posts: 2586
Loc: Tweed Heads
So when did the 1930's drought break?
This research article produced about colorado drought and wet regimes indicates the major wet and dry periods
and you could certainly argue that a drought was due, post 1996..

A History of
DROUGHT IN COLORADO
LESSONS LEARNED AND
WHAT LIES AHEAD
( a great research paper and EASY for public to read)
http://ccc.atmos.colostate.edu/pdfs/ahistoryofdrought.pdf

1930-1940 DRY Most widespread and longest lasting
(and most famous) drought in Colorado recorded
history. Severe drought developed in 1931 and peaked
in 1934 and early 1935. Interrupted by heavy spring
rains in 1935 and more widespread heavy rains in 1938.

Culminated with one more extremely dry year in 1939
when several stations along the Front Range recorded
their driest year in history
--------

Drought episodes have lasted as long as 10 years
(1930s). However, these long-duration droughts are
interspersed with periods of wet weather. For example,
some of Colorado’s wettest months on record (April
1900, May 1935, September 1938) were embedded in
long-duration drought episodes.
-------

statewide
in 1995, 1997 and 1999. The decade of the 1990s
has been the wettest in recorded history over much
of southeastern Colorado.

---
The heavy precipitation of the 1980s and 1990s does not
guarantee that wet weather will continue into the 21st
century. Neither does it assure us that drought is imminent.
But one way or another, we know that drought will
return. The longer we go
without drought, the more
likely we will be ill-prepared
when drought makes its
inevitable next visit to Colorado.
Are we ready?
-------( so it has arrived 2012..)


RAINFALL DEFICITS time series COLORADO



RAINFALL REGIMES COLORADO ( west central US)

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#1119460 - 10/08/2012 22:28 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: crikey]
crikey Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 01/02/2011
Posts: 2586
Loc: Tweed Heads
That 'hypothesis' is by no means conclusive lightning lee. That is a natural variability 'possible' correlation.
Maybe CO2 has had a role in the amplitude or strength, duration and timing of the drought
The scientists will have to prove that.
How do you demonstrate CO2 forcing and if this forcing amplifies effects on US drought..?
and make the findings statistically significant
Hmm .. maybe ..A hard call..

If CO2 concentration can drive up Arctic temps, then you could argue that more droughts in Colorado and USA, l suppose.
Now that's a scary thought.

AV
Where do you find unadjusted data??

I found the link with PDO weak?
I did see a better correlation with SOI .

I did say it was a quick look..
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#1119490 - 11/08/2012 08:16 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: crikey]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14155
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics

What does ‘belief’ in climate change really mean?

10 August 2012, 2.24pm AEST

(1) http://theconversation.edu.au/what-does-belief-in-climate-change-really-mean-8746

Where one stands on “climate change” has been such a vexed and often confusing issue, at dinner parties, over coffee, with the taxi driver, and in terms of media reporting of where the Australian public is at. A simple reality is that most people are trying to make some reasonable sense of this seemingly…

Author

Joseph Reser

Adjunct Professor, School of Psychology at Griffith University
.

Disclosure Statement

Joseph Reser receives funding from the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, and Griffith Climate Change Response Program

The Conversation provides independent analysis and commentary from academics and researchers.

We are funded by CSIRO, Melbourne, Monash, RMIT, UTS, UWA, Deakin, Flinders, Griffith, La Trobe, Murdoch, QUT, Swinburne, UniSA, UTAS, UWS and VU.

Member of The Conversation.

Articles by This Author
1 July 2011 Polls, framings and public understandings: climate change and opinion polls 9 June 2011 Australians and climate change – beliefs about public belief may be quite wrong


Many Australians think they have experienced events associated with climate change. AAP Image/Tony McDonough.

Where one stands on “climate change” has been such a vexed and often confusing issue, at dinner parties, over coffee, with the taxi driver, and in terms of media reporting of where the Australian public is at.

A simple reality is that most people are trying to make some reasonable sense of this seemingly profound threat, quite complex phenomenon, “the science”, and what seems to be happening in terms of global and local weather patterns and extreme weather events. And the myriad information lines available to us are often not much help, and the messages often confusing and conflicting. All, of course, further complicated by the contested politics, the carbon tax, and how to survive a climate change conversation. Not to mention, of course, the _media_ted nature of the average person’s encounters with climate change.

Looking through a psychological window sheds some light on all of this. We are all adaptively hard-wired to make reasonable sense of possible environmental threats. We keep a “weather eye” on noteworthy changes, the strange, the curious. When consequential environmental events or changes take place, we try (and need) to impose some sense and meaning on what is happening and why. We want to know who, if anyone, was responsible.

Sense making is very much about causal explanation or attribution, in human terms, and in ways that both answer the question of why and let us feel that we live in a coherent and reasonably ordered, and not too dangerous or unpredictable world.

Humans try to impose a sense of meaning on environmental events. We want to know why things happen. AAP.

So let’s look at “climate change”. What exactly is it that has been so exhaustively covered by the media? Is it the phenomenon of changing weather patterns linked to atmospheric gases and their relative makeup. Is it the implied consequences of such changes? Is it the intertwined environmental, social, or political issues, or the debate about “the science”?

In this context, language like “attitudes about” or “beliefs in” climate change seems a bit strained. The issue is whether one accepts the earth’s climate has taken a different direction, influenced by recent human activities. Related questions are why is this happening, and what can or should be done about it?

This is where causal attribution – and human agency and responsibility – comes in. The science tells us that greenhouse gas emissions have “forced” the changes that are taking place. This sense-conferring explanation does not suggest that there are not many natural forces and atmospheric dynamics at play, but it does point to a rather pivotal human influence.

This human agency has real implications in terms of what can be done about this, how the problem and threat can be best addressed, and whether what is now set in train can be turned around. A level of human causality and agency also raises issues of responsibility, and a spectrum of emotions, including deep concern, felt loss, pessimism, and guilt.

We know that when human actions or technology are implicated in environmental changes, or disturb “natural” processes, the risk and danger becomes more elevated, more disturbing, more sinister. Climate change has something of this hybrid natural/technological disaster character, with human society likely poised to reap a bitter harvest and a dramatically altered environment.

But back to the starting question. What are we talking about when we talk about climate change? Documentaries like the ABC’s “I can change your mind about climate” tell us that “everyone agrees that climate is warming” and within a minute or two that “50% of Australians do not believe that climate change is happening.”

Is this reasonable, logically or psychologically? When people are discussing climate change, is the subject matter climate variability or contemporary, anthropogenic climate change? Would we really be having all of these discussions and debate about climate variability?

When humans are implicated in environmental change, the risk becomes more sinister. shek graham/Flickr.

Why does this matter? When researchers are examining public risk perceptions and understandings about climate change, how they’re changing, and the psychological and social impacts that the threat of climate change might be having, it doesn’t make sense to ask whether respondents believe in or accept climate variability, and to treat the matter of human causality as something quite different.

It also does not make much sense to ask about or frame an individual’s risk perceptions or understandings in terms of believing or not believing in climate change, or asking whether climate change is exclusively caused by natural processes or by human activities and impacts. This latter has never been the climate change science question.

The great majority of our survey respondents, across two very substantial national surveys (N=7443 in total) accepted that climate change was happening (74%), and that its impacts were currently being felt in Australia (52%). As well, 45% reported personally encountering environmental changes they thought were likely due to climate change, and 59% thought where they lived was vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

When asked about the respective contributing roles of human activity impacts and natural causes in contemporary climate change, 84% said it was a combination of both.

So why is this matter and language of climate change “belief” so emotion-laden and polarising? Is it that this is a particularly disturbing threat and looming global disaster? Is it because such questions are not really about climate change per se, but about how we see ourselves, our political and social identity, and our own relationship with and felt responsibility for this shared world in which we live? Do responses reflect a new form of political correctness, depending on one’s party affiliation?

Many psychologists would argue that there is a good deal of defence and “terror management” taking place with respect to the spectre of climate change, with the world views and belief systems of some being rather badly shaken by current scientific assessments and projections, and frantically shored up, by discrediting the science, the scientists, and confronting documentaries.

The debate and conversational footwork about “where one stands” will continue, but our survey findings are actually very reassuring. They tell us that the Australian public by and large is making very reasonable and adaptive sense out of the somewhat chaotic and contradictory picture of climate change.

They are mostly very concerned, think that it is very important, feel a personal responsibility to be doing something about their own carbon footprint, and want their government to take clear and effective policy measures. They are taking action, trying to make a difference, and in the process reframing how they see themselves, their environment, and climate change.

This sounds more like psychological and behavioural adaptation to me than a matter of belief or conviction. It is a coming to terms with and acceptance of a significantly altered world and climate regime that we bear some responsibility for.
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202mm April 2017
Best 156mm 19/5/17
Oct 136mm
2017 Total 829mm
2016 Total 649mm
2015 Total 375mm
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#1119554 - 11/08/2012 14:38 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: SBT]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14155
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
Germany's Green Energy Transition May Force Out Industry
(1) http://thegwpf.org/international-news/63...t-industry.html


Wednesday, 08 August 2012 12:11 Daniel Wetzel, Die Welt

The public discussion about Germany's green energy transition has taken a new direction. The rise of electricity prices in Germany is suddenly no longer blamed on the billions spent for building solar and wind farms, biomass plants and power grids. Now it is “the industry” which is being blamed for its lobbying which has resulted in a variety of financial reliefs, compensations and tax exemptions and for abandoning the 'community solidarity' of this 'national effort.'

The green industry lobby has agreed to this new line of attack after it came under increasing pressure by the rampant increase in costs. It's new motto: it is not the absolute level of costs, which is the problem, but its unjust distribution.

Political horse trading in eco-tax policy

What makes this argument so dangerous is that it has a kernel of truth. It is true that the number of companies that are exempt from net charges, levies and green electricity taxes, has risen sharply in recent months. The number of companies which enjoy energy policy privileges go now far beyond the circle of those energy-intensive industries which have to compete with their products in international markets and thus would be eligible for exemptions.



Government subsidies, tax relief and privileges for Germany's energy-intensive industries; in billion of Euos




Behind this questionable political development appears to be a political deal: If we are to pay for the really absurd and inefficient expansion of expensive solar power in Germany to 52 gigawatts, you need to ensure a de facto eco-tax exemption for industry. There is an old method of finding a majority in politics in general, not just with regards the green energy revolution: criticism of escalating costs is not met by cost reductions, but by giving more money to the critics.

Energy policy is becoming an election issue

The only problem with this approach is that the Germans, with their rigorous application, tend to throw out the baby with the bathwater. Facts that apply to specific cases and to certain segments are used indiscriminately, especially during election campaigns. And the next elections are coming up: the Lower Saxony state election campaign this fall and winter is also the early start of the general election campaign in 2013.

Especially in Lower Saxony, which is so crucial for the expansion of the grid network and the generation of green energy, the issue of energy policy will determine the political debate. The new allegation that the rising cost of the green energy revolution is caused by industry examptions could readily get stuck in the minds of voters here - and stay there until the general election in September next year.

Some major buyers pay little for electricity

Nothing would be more dangerous, however, than to belittle and to trivialize the costs of the green energy revolution or distract from the issue at all. The ecological restructuring of Germany’s energy system would only be seen as a model worthy of imitation internationally if it had not been enforced with billions of handouts by a very affluent economy, but if it can be shown to be implemented economically and efficiently.

Consequently, a close look at the level of costs and their distribution is essential: it is true that green power reduces temporally the wholesale price of electricity on the electricity exchange and that some big buyers in the industry, as a result, can buy power relatively cheaply - especially if they have been exempted from both of environmental tax- and from network charges.

But this should not obscure the fact that private consumers and especially small and medium-sized businesses are heavily burdened by rising energy prices. Especially the medium-sized companies suffer doubly: first, from the higher energy costs in production and secondly because customers have less money in their wallets because of the rising electricity prices

It should also be remembered that the absolute level of wholesale prices is not really important for the competitiveness of the industry. The comparison with the electricity prices of other countries is much more important for the decisions regarding relocation or outsourcing.

And this comparison does not look good. Germany has the highest industrial electricity prices in Europe. With increasing costs of the green energy policy, relocating abroad is becoming increasingly attractive for companies, especially for energy-intensive businesses.

In the U.S., the energy price is currently falling dramatically. The recent development of shale gas production there means that the U.S. natural gas price is currently only about 20 percent of the European price. Thus the U.S. produces electricity much cheaper. This fact cannot simply be ignored by German chemical or metallurgical companies when it considers decisions about the location of a new factory.

The supply chains are at stake

The loss of such industries would have potentially disastrous consequences for Germany, however. The strength of Germany’s economy – compared to international standards - is mainly due to unusually intact and tightly knit supply chains. Basic industries are not the dinosaurs of "old economy” - already condemned to extinction. They are rather at the beginning of the value chains; with their quality and price level they set the starting point for all subsequent stages of industrial production.

German machine producers, car manufacturers and electrical industry are world leaders, because their engineers and skilled workers have an exceptional knowledge of the characteristics and abilities of their materials.

This expertise also stems from the geographical proximity and close ties of primary industry and processing companies in the manufacturing sector. This proximity should not be put at risk through negligence, allowing value chains to break because companies are driven abroad by unilateral cost burdens due to the green energy transition.

Translation Philipp Mueller

Die Welt, 7 August 2012
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202mm April 2017
Best 156mm 19/5/17
Oct 136mm
2017 Total 829mm
2016 Total 649mm
2015 Total 375mm
2014 Total 1032mm
2013 Total 715mm







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#1119555 - 11/08/2012 14:41 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: SBT]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14155
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics


UK government scraps environmental regulations to save £400 million

(1) http://www.energyefficiencynews.com/articles/i/5313/?cid=5

UK Energy Minister Charles Hendry announced yesterday the scrapping of 86 environmental regulations that will save businesses £400 million over the next 20 years.

The package of reforms, which also includes improvements to a further 48 regulatory regimes, is part of the government’s Red Tape Challenge that aims to remove surplus regulation hindering businesses.

“It is vital that we have a regulatory regime which promotes fairness and consumer and environmental protection, but does not impose unnecessary costs or barriers to generating the necessary investment, innovation and skills we need to build the low carbon economy,” says Hendry.

As well as simplifications to the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) and the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) energy efficiency scheme, the changes cover areas from discharges from chemical installations to requirements for electricity lines and gas pipelines.

The changes to the EU ETS, which were confirmed earlier this summer, will allow small emitters and organisations like hospitals to opt out of the scheme from 2013.

The government maintains that the changes will maintain all environmental protections reducing costs and unnecessary burdens.
_________________________
202mm April 2017
Best 156mm 19/5/17
Oct 136mm
2017 Total 829mm
2016 Total 649mm
2015 Total 375mm
2014 Total 1032mm
2013 Total 715mm







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#1119569 - 11/08/2012 15:51 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: SBT]
Anthony Violi Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 06/11/2001
Posts: 2320
Loc: Soon to be Mt Barker - SA
Yes the drought is bad...



But not nearly as bad as 1934, which is the warmest era in the record books.

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#1119615 - 11/08/2012 19:58 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: Anthony Violi]
CeeBee Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 25/02/2012
Posts: 2637
The droughts gotten worse in August...



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#1119665 - 12/08/2012 07:48 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: CeeBee]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
High Heat, Gone! Drought, Fading Fast...
"It doesn’t often happen this quickly and dramatically, but the Ohio Valley drought and heat wave are effectively gone! Yes, there are small portions of some counties that are much drier than normal, but based on rainfall estimates from recent storms and looking at the past 30 days; the locations that haven't had at least 2 inches of rainfall are few…mainly in southeast Indiana. Here’s a map showing rainfall totals for the past 30 days and here’s a map showing the departure from normal.

Note that only parts of southeast Indiana are running two inches or more below normal for the past month with a few other spots between .50” and 1.50” below normal in that time. In other words, the overwhelming majority of the Tri-State region has had normal to much above normal rainfall recently, and the in past week (map here) everyone is near to above normal in rainfall for our region. Not bad at all…only a small part of Clinton and Ripley County missed the heavier rain…and there’s more rain coming late Monday into Tuesday, and again next Thursday night and Friday.

That’s how you break a drought, and we did it in a big way. Some locations had 10 inches of rain since mid July (pink colors on the first map above)! The official Drought Monitor map will reflect the improvements in the next two weeks, but for now we can say goodbye to the drought of 2012 in our part of the world, with just a few areas left for improvement.

Another factor in eliminating drought is temperature. If we get regular rainfall, even if it’s below normal, but the air is cooler, soil moisture evaporates more slowly and less rain can still improve dry conditions. Well, sure enough, after the recent storms were turned cooler…much cooler! Highs were only in the mid to upper 70s on Friday and Saturday with lows in the 50s, and all signs are pointing to even colder air next weekend!

We’re not alone. Welcomed rainfall hit most of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Iowa and Minnesota. It’s not enough to break the drought (yet) to our west, but it’s a huge step in the right direction. Those areas also cooled off in the last few days and the one thing you won’t see, hear or read for the rest of the summer is headlines for high heat in the Plains and Midwest. It’s done! That’s not to say that a few days in the 90s won’t be possible west of here, but they will be scattered and inconsequential. We may not see another day above 90 degrees in the Tri-State until next year, but I’ll lock in that forecast in the next 10 days.

The weather pattern favors too much cool and unsettled weather for big heat to develop. If it does, it shouldn’t last more than two days. Once we get into September the diminishing daylight and after-effects from the August cool-down will limit heating…and 90s aren’t all that common during the first month of autumn anyway..."
http://www.examiner.com/article/high-heat-gone-drought-fading-fast?CID=examiner_alerts_article

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#1119668 - 12/08/2012 08:01 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: bd bucketingdown]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
"....Earlier this summer I predicted that the hot weather would be forgotten faster than it developed, and you’ll see what I mean soon. No one will be talking about the heat when the new headline becomes the colder air…with a chance for frost in the Upper Midwest by Friday and Saturday morning!

Expect lows in the 50s with highs in the upper 70s to low 80s on Sunday, mid 80s Monday with thunderstorms late, and mid to upper 70s for highs on Tuesday. We may even see highs in the 60s to near 70 with lows in the 40s next Saturday and Sunday!

This is exactly what my Skyeye Weather clients were expecting in my outlooks from late May and June. The global pattern favored a late summer cool-down, followed by a mild September and than a crash to cold with some snow in October and November. I’ll be updating my Wild World of Weather (W3) Network subscribers on my specific autumn and winter forecast soon.

Keep your eyes on the sky and enjoy the changing weather…

Rich Apuzzo
Chief Meteorologist
Skyeye Weather LLC"

http://www.examiner.com/article/high-heat-gone-drought-fading-fast?CID=examiner_alerts_article

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#1119672 - 12/08/2012 08:28 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: bd bucketingdown]
ROM Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/01/2007
Posts: 6628
Not good news, bd. CeeBee will now be down to two things to post about, the Arctic ice and??? What was the other one?

And also I recall we were lectured some time ago on how any extreme rainfall was responsible for the dangerous rising sea levels when it ran off into the sea!

Really dangerous stuff, this global warming!

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#1119680 - 12/08/2012 09:13 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: ROM]
CeeBee Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 25/02/2012
Posts: 2637
BD - that clown Rich Apuzzo is a joke.

Rich Apuzzo, long time meteorogist with Fox 19 news has started his own World Wide Web weather broadcast. Since leaving (getting sacked actually) Fox 19 news in October, Rich has been working with Skyeyeweather.com which was founded by his wife Ruthie in 2004. ( haha, really professional - not!)

"I have been a big fan of weather education for all ages and will continue to pursue many different avenues through which I can learn, personally experience and teach others about the ever-changing world of weather," Rich states, "and having access to million of people not just locally, but around the would has been a dream of mine."

From his home in Mt.Washington, Rich has set up a studio in his front room ( ROFLMAO! ), purchased state of the art Weather graphics and currently broadcast "Weather Rush" live Monday through Friday at 7pm. Each episode of "Weather Rush" is then archieved until then next live broadcast.

Rich then spends most of his free time either on the Skyeye weather forum, Yahoo Chat live with other weather enthusist, working at Channel WKEF 22 and FOX 45 on Saturday nights or singing in the church choir.

link

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#1119685 - 12/08/2012 09:31 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: CeeBee]
CeeBee Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 25/02/2012
Posts: 2637
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#1119686 - 12/08/2012 09:33 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: CeeBee]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14155
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
So your taking the piss out of him because he IS a meterologist are you CB or because he runs his forecasts from his lounge room?

What does that make you? You run your anti sceptic waffle from what? An apple mac in a dorm room? Sometimes you make it so easy to shoot you down in flames it isn't funny you sad little troll.

The mere fact that with current technology you can run a credible service from home shouldn't be all that surprising, after all Anthony Watts has been doing it for years and his blog has how many hits so far? Oh thats right 122,909,278 views won quite a few awards for his work and he actually helps people understand what teh debate is about. Not belittles those who ask questions.

Rich states that he runs his service as an education for those who want to view it.

So what do you call what your doing CB? At least he is educating someone - your just trying to undermine deliberate debate and your attempts to do so bring you no credit at all.

Oh and in case you forgot Bill Gates and Steve Jobs both started out in garages at home selling their computers and ideas you arrogant/ignorant little oink.
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#1119689 - 12/08/2012 09:37 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: CeeBee]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
You have shown yourself to be a bad loser CB, all your USA stuff is shown to be weather not climate Rich forecast it correctly back in May-June I have followed him for a long time. He is genuine and good and gives factual data.
He forecast the end of the drought and high temps correctly, you are wrong and as usual won't admit anything.
The readers here can see the truth, you cannot hide the truth, the thruth will win out all the time. Read it again folks, don't let CB pull the wool over
your eyes.
High Heat, Gone! Drought, Fading Fast...
"It doesn’t often happen this quickly and dramatically, but the Ohio Valley drought and heat wave are effectively gone! Yes, there are small portions of some counties that are much drier than normal, but based on rainfall estimates from recent storms and looking at the past 30 days; the locations that haven't had at least 2 inches of rainfall are few…mainly in southeast Indiana. Here’s a map showing rainfall totals for the past 30 days and here’s a map showing the departure from normal.

Note that only parts of southeast Indiana are running two inches or more below normal for the past month with a few other spots between .50” and 1.50” below normal in that time. In other words, the overwhelming majority of the Tri-State region has had normal to much above normal rainfall recently, and the in past week (map here) everyone is near to above normal in rainfall for our region. Not bad at all…only a small part of Clinton and Ripley County missed the heavier rain…and there’s more rain coming late Monday into Tuesday, and again next Thursday night and Friday.

That’s how you break a drought, and we did it in a big way. Some locations had 10 inches of rain since mid July (pink colors on the first map above)! The official Drought Monitor map will reflect the improvements in the next two weeks, but for now we can say goodbye to the drought of 2012 in our part of the world, with just a few areas left for improvement.

Another factor in eliminating drought is temperature. If we get regular rainfall, even if it’s below normal, but the air is cooler, soil moisture evaporates more slowly and less rain can still improve dry conditions. Well, sure enough, after the recent storms were turned cooler…much cooler! Highs were only in the mid to upper 70s on Friday and Saturday with lows in the 50s, and all signs are pointing to even colder air next weekend!

We’re not alone. Welcomed rainfall hit most of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Iowa and Minnesota. It’s not enough to break the drought (yet) to our west, but it’s a huge step in the right direction. Those areas also cooled off in the last few days and the one thing you won’t see, hear or read for the rest of the summer is headlines for high heat in the Plains and Midwest. It’s done! That’s not to say that a few days in the 90s won’t be possible west of here, but they will be scattered and inconsequential. We may not see another day above 90 degrees in the Tri-State until next year, but I’ll lock in that forecast in the next 10 days.

The weather pattern favors too much cool and unsettled weather for big heat to develop. If it does, it shouldn’t last more than two days. Once we get into September the diminishing daylight and after-effects from the August cool-down will limit heating…and 90s aren’t all that common during the first month of autumn anyway..."
http://www.examiner.com/article/high-heat-gone-drought-fading-fast?CID=examiner_alerts_article
"....Earlier this summer I predicted that the hot weather would be forgotten faster than it developed, and you’ll see what I mean soon. No one will be talking about the heat when the new headline becomes the colder air…with a chance for frost in the Upper Midwest by Friday and Saturday morning!

Expect lows in the 50s with highs in the upper 70s to low 80s on Sunday, mid 80s Monday with thunderstorms late, and mid to upper 70s for highs on Tuesday. We may even see highs in the 60s to near 70 with lows in the 40s next Saturday and Sunday!

This is exactly what my Skyeye Weather clients were expecting in my outlooks from late May and June. The global pattern favored a late summer cool-down, followed by a mild September and than a crash to cold with some snow in October and November. I’ll be updating my Wild World of Weather (W3) Network subscribers on my specific autumn and winter forecast soon.

Keep your eyes on the sky and enjoy the changing weather…

Rich Apuzzo
Chief Meteorologist
Skyeye Weather LLC"

http://www.examiner.com/article/high-heat-gone-drought-fading-fast?CID=examiner_alerts_article


Edited by bd bucketingdown (12/08/2012 09:39)

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#1119690 - 12/08/2012 09:41 Re: Interesting news articles about AGW [Re: bd bucketingdown]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
Denigrating a person as a form of defence is pretty low really imo!

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