Page 356 of 358 < 1 2 ... 354 355 356 357 358 >
Topic Options
#1071167 - 04/02/2012 09:41 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mathew]
Mathew Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 11/01/2006
Posts: 6860
Loc: Townsville, Queensland
I think we only had ABC radio and channel seven news that was about it I think that morning.

All the TV channel where out as well the radio Channels I think this time today.
_________________________
Rs tl 2018-19 Wet Season. > 2018 tl 903.0mm - Decem month 223.2mm - 275.82mm - feb-2019 month 883.5mm Mar 173.4mm
> 01/01/2019 1:46pm (04-17-19_ 06:23 pm) Yr 1261mm / Weekly rain 0.0mm month 5.4mm / 0.0mm

Top
#1071180 - 04/02/2012 10:00 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Raindammit]
Mathew Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 11/01/2006
Posts: 6860
Loc: Townsville, Queensland
I just found an another cool clip some one post on you tube.

I hope you enjoy it.





Edited by Mathew (04/02/2012 10:05)
_________________________
Rs tl 2018-19 Wet Season. > 2018 tl 903.0mm - Decem month 223.2mm - 275.82mm - feb-2019 month 883.5mm Mar 173.4mm
> 01/01/2019 1:46pm (04-17-19_ 06:23 pm) Yr 1261mm / Weekly rain 0.0mm month 5.4mm / 0.0mm

Top
#1071512 - 04/02/2012 23:21 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Dawgggg]
ol mate Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 27/03/2010
Posts: 1227
Loc: Ingham, North Qld
Originally Posted By: OzCyChaser Trav
We were in inghAm watching the westward movement going come on baby jump SW like we were hoping we forcasted right poke

It was looking very dangerous to be in inghAm for a few radar loops. If it continued sw inghAm could have seen the eye wall.

If it didn't move west for a hour or two inghAm to Townsville would have seen some serious damage.


I remember looking at the radar and thinking the same thing. And crapping my pants. I'm glad we didn't see an eyewall!
_________________________
Ingham - Golden Gumboot holder of the Northern Region - cuz we steal Townsville's Rain!

Top
#1185944 - 25/03/2013 08:44 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville
Over two years on, and Yasi is still the last cyclonic event to impact the east coastline of Queensland.

Likely to be 3 years now. I still can't get rid of the emotions that stuck at that storm. I can't let it go.
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1185960 - 25/03/2013 10:23 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Raindammit Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 14/02/2002
Posts: 13341
Loc: Townsville & Bilyana NQ
Neither can I Trav, very much a life changing experience for me personally and totally transformed my views on cyclones.
_________________________
Belgian Gardens, Townsville NQ
Bilyana FNQ

Top
#1185973 - 25/03/2013 11:06 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville


A picture tells a thousand words. I reckon anyone living from Cooktown to Rockhampton on the 31st of january 2011 would have had exactly the same thoughts as I did when I first saw this image. I remember the chills that I got down the back of my spine quite vividly. Im trying to remember the first things that came to my head when I saw this image. I was about to knock off work, and the past week had already been a massive week, especially with the passage of Tropical Cyclone Anthony and the build up ( week long ) to his projected crossing. I even think that this may have been the day after I chased Anthony. That really wasnt a good day from memory. Nitso and I only got back from Bowen at around 4am, And I had about 2 hours sleep before slagging off to work. My mind really wasnt thinking about Yasi at this stage. Models had her going south, North, everywhere from about Cairns to Mackay. EC by this stage had re aligned itself further north after a few runs nailing bowen/home hill and mackay. It seemed all conspiricy at this stage, I was warning people at work that something big was coming, but I couldnt nail a landfall point. I finally got people to believe me that even if Yasi did hit 200 kilometres north that Townsville would still feel Some sort of Category from this beast. Our best bet for no damage would have been 200 kilometres north of the landfall point. However by 4pm 31.2.11 it was quite obvious that the sub tropical ridge was not going to let Yasi move SW. She was going to ride the Axis of the STR and move WSW making a bee line for the NQ/FNQ coastline as a massive and destructive system. Yasi had the conditions ahead of her, and the size to match up to a WILMA/KATRINA type Hurricane.

When this image finally came out The feeling I think that i can bring up would have been something of excitement/disbelief. I remember being on the phone to Nitso for hours, Half my phone bill would have also went to Mick 10 LOL. We couldnt believe that something this big and dangerous would be heading for our coastline. Thus we began our preperations. What do we do? How the hell can we chase Yasi in such low lying areas of North Queensland, and do it efficiently, so that we dont get stuck for a week by the Herbert River. By this stage we knew that our home town of Townsville was going to get a touch up. If it hit between Innisfail and Cardwell, Townsville was always going to get bad storm surge, and Cat 2-3 wind strengths. So do we take the safer option and stay at home and still get a good show. Or do we go north, and try get those 200+kmhr wind gusts that we have been talking and dreaming about for years.

EXTENDED FORCAST from the 31st of Jan

Forecast for Monday
Tropical Cyclone Anthony is expected to cross the Burdekin Coast south of Ayr close to midnight. Please refer to the latest products from the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre for the latest information. Showers and isolated thunderstorms are expected over the far northern tropics. Heavier rain areas and thunderstorms associated with the cyclone are expected elsewhere along the southern tropical and central coasts, and should also extend inland into the tropical and central interior. Cloud should increase over western Queensland with patchy light rain and showers developing later in the day. Mostly fine conditions in the southeast with only isolated showers expected. Tropical Cyclone Yasi is expected to be moving steadily westwards.

Forecast for Tuesday
The remnant of cyclone Anthony is expected to have weakened to a deep low over the central interior, moving towards the southwest of the state. Showers and isolated thunderstorms are expected over the northern tropics and central districts in the wake of the system, increasing to areas of rain and isolated thunderstorms over the southwest. Isolated showers over southeast districts, scattered along the coast with possible thunderstorms over inland parts. Isolated showers and thunderstorms over the northwest. Tropical Cyclone Yasi is expected to be moving west over the central Coral Sea region.

Forecast for Wednesday
Showers and thunderstorms will continue across most of the state as the atmosphere remains moist and unstable. Showers and thunderstorms are expected to increase to thundery rain areas during the day about the east coast and adjacent inland between about Cooktown and Bundaberg with strong to possibly gale force winds developing due to the approach of Tropical Cyclone Yasi.

Forecast for Thursday
Tropical Cyclone Yasi is likely to make landfall on the Queensland east coast as a large and strong system. The most likely area of crossing is again the tropical coast although the potential exists for a crossing further north or south. Storm to hurricane force winds and very heavy rainfall are likely to accompany the passage of Tropical Cyclone Yasi, and extend inland during the day to the adjacent interior. Scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms persisting over the west of the state. Scattered showers about the southeast and isolated showers over the southern interior.

Outlook for Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Tropical Cyclone Yasi should continue to move west across the state, slowly weakening and reaching the western border over the weekend. Gale force winds and heavy rains will accompany the system. Showers and thunderstorms should continue elsewhere through the tropics and the interior due to the moist, unstable airflow. Scattered showers will persist over southeast Queensland




24 hours until Landfall - Myself Nitso, Thomo and Shane from Townsville Storms all went down to the seaview on the strand for a beer and a catch up just to discuss how can we tackle this storm to try get the best footage. We knew it was always going to be difficult with flooding, night time crossing potential, and also the duration of strong winds before the eyewall. We made the decision that Thomo and Shane were going to Ride it out in Townsville. Moreso due to safety reasons. Shane has a young family, Thomo lived in a low lying area and wanted to look after his place. Nitso and I made the plans to leave Townsville for our targeted landfall point of Cardwell. We always believed that cardwell was going to be the area hardest hit from Yasi, as long as the system stayed north of the town and brought the winds ONSHORE. This means that there is less friction for wind coming off the ocean, and the storm surge will also come onshore. I remember going to bed at around 1130pm and had to be at Nitsos around 430am, so we can beat the police before they blocked off roads. We had heard dozens of rumours that this was happening.

I finally woke up that morning....WAY BEHIND SCHEDULE lol !!!! 10 missed calls from NItso I reckon....I Guess that week had just caught up on me, a quick shower and breakfest and I was driving over Nitsos place about 2 hours later than planned. Not the best way to start a Chase.....And then the news on ABC radio, Yasi had hit Category 5, with Wind gusts above 280kmhr. At this point I was thinking to myself why was I doing this haha. I took one last look at home just in case it made a southern landfall and drove into town.

By 630 we were fuelled up and on our way north, it was a beautiful morning. High level cirrus outflow was all over the horizon from Yasi and made for an amazing sunrise. To our SE we could see the first outer rain band running up the coast. Cumulunimbus clouds accmompanied the first band. This band went through townsville at like 9am and brought 60kmhr wind gusts and torrential rain. By 9am we were in Cardwell. We had made good time, and scoped around the place. People were rushing to sandbag front shops everywhere, You could tell there was a real panic going on. To be honest I felt sick. I remember seeing a group of backpackers that were trying to get a bus out but with no luck. I really hope someone helped them out and got them out of there, they obviously must have but it was an uneasy place to be in. Everyone in Cardwell knew they were going to get hammered. The conditions arriving in Cardwell were fine. Sun was out and hiding now and again behind the high level outflow from Yasi. It was incredible how fast this changed. By 11am, the sky had turned into this grey aggressive mid level wash of cloud. It looked turbulant. The wind had definatly picked up, and thats when I started to really get my nerves going. 2 hours ago it was like a normal summers day. Within 120 minutes it had turned into near gale force winds and you could really tell something was coming. Yasi was still 12 hours away.

Before long Cardwell started to quiet down apart from the passing traffic that was evacuating from the north. We set up our Davis Vantage Pro weather station on the water front and started discussing logistics and door knocking motels. This is the reason why we left so early, so we could have enough time to get out if need be. We got accomodation and parted with Channel 7 from Sydney who were doing a story on us. Nice blokes, but they had to get up to Innisfail to get the story out and planned to possibly meet up with us down the line. They had no idea what they were getting themselves into at this point. I think I made them a bit worried haha.

By around lunchtime, Police were driving around in Patrol cars with microphones urging people to self evacuate. I was talking to an old bloke that lived by himself on the main street in a old queenslander, I asked if he was going to evacuate and he stupidly replied that he has been through 20 cyclones and this one will be no different. I feared for this guys life I tell you that.

The next 2 hours consisted of Nitso and myself trying to make an educated decision on what to do. With so many people not evacuating, we didnt want to be caught up in a natural disaster with likely deaths. 6 blokes we met down at the Hinchinbrook Marina also told us that they were not evacuating and were drinking. Later that night they had rung up the Police for help and there cries for help were put around the country. They are lucky to be alive. So we made the decision to head a couple kilometres down the road to Ingham to ride this baby out.

Our main reasons for not staying in Cardwell were due to 2 main reasons. The storm surge scared the crap out of us. Landfall time was still not pinpointed and a crossing on a rising tide was not out of the question. We were staying in a motel right on the main street, and if this didnt hit on a low tide then Cardwell was going to be destroyed. Also the other reason is what I said earlier. I didnt want to be messed up with a crime scene.

We encountered heavy rain all the way back to Ingham, and drove past about 5 Screaming Ambulances heading north. Ingham was a safer bet. 10-15 kilometres inland which would escape the storm surge, and it was just that little extra closer to home if need be. 120km North of Townsville. That afternoon was the longest afternoon in history. The winds in ingham were Gusty all afternoon, with 100kmhr squalls about once every hour. We made a quick dash out to lucinda at around 4pm to see if conditions were worse than 15ks inland. Suprisingly they were even more calm than ingham. However this was just due to us being in between the outer bands. Our drive back into Ingham was VERY HAIRY. Sustained winds picked up and the gusts started to frequently get above 110kmhr. We were in Category 1 territory now and it was only just nudging 530. The 40 minute drive consisted of Dodging Debris the whole way back and videotaping the squalls ripping over houses. The wind was no an audible roar. Yasi was finally making herself present. However ALOT later than I expected.

We finally got back to Ingham, and the wind strengths were rising rapidly. Within 2 hours after nightfall we were in Category 2 territory. Ingham still had power suprisingly. Driving around Ingham was crazy, trees already blocked roads and powerlines dangerously swayed. The roar i mentioned earlier was now like a Jet engine. Lucinda was getting hammered by 175kmhr winds before the equipment failed. We were now getting sustained winds of around 85-95kmhr with gusts to 120-130kmhr. All the palm trees were bending over. We sat our DAVIS weather station out in a field for the whole event.

We went for one more drive around town, before making the call that it was way to dangerous to be out driving now, and like a switch all of Inghams power went off. The real stuff had finally started, the wind noise was incredible and is something I will never forget. You could hear roofs coming off and crashing in the distance. Its pitch black so you cannot see a thing at all except for whats directly in front of your flash light. Trees started snapping around our motel which we got on camera. ALl hell was breaking loose, the Air con unit was shaking in the wall and water was flying out of it. The glass sliding door was just shaking like crazy. We were now hitting the 180-190kmhr wind gust range. One thing I will say is that the Sustained winds of Yasi were like that of a Atlantic Hurricane. She was incredible.

Soon the eye crossed to our north, and the onshore winds were going to head straight into the front of the motel room so in fear of the glass door breaking we went to the other side of the motel into another room. Things got pretty damn hectic from here on. THe motel sign out the front just disappeared and the Roof started coming off another room down on the other side of the motel. The noise was incredible. This was the height of the storm, and Yasi was living up to its expectations. We recorded winds in this peroid of -

214.5KMHR GUSTS
145kmhr SUSTAINED

I was beginning to realise how bad things must be in Tully at this point and other areas. If we were copping a flogging, imagine what was happening up there. Cardwell with no doubt and areas north of Cardwell would have been seeing 260-270 for sure.

At around 230am, I fell asleep and woke up at sunrise. We made a few drives around town, it was still pouring down with rain and we had a go at getting over the cardwell range. No luck.....It didnt open for another 3 days or so. We then made the decision toi high tail it back to Townsville as cattle creek was about to go over, and there was no way i wanted to be stuck up here for a week.

The drive back to Townsville was terrible, gale force winds gusting to 100kmhr smashed us the whole way. Dodging trees for 100km isnt my idea of fun. We finally arrived back on the strand to survey the damage and the place was a mess. Much worse than Cyclone tessie 11 years beforehand. The storm surge had inundated hundreds of properties in West end, South Townsville and garbutt. With fuel low, we decided to head home and face the clean up. At 11am, 12 hours after Landfall we were still getting gale force winds at home. The air was salty and disgusting. Our black ute was white from the ocean spray. Townsville had recieved 163kmhr winds which i was suprised at given being 200km south of the landfall point. I guess the ridge underneath the cyclone really compressed the isobars. Coming home to find the mess was not fun, we spent the next 5 days straight cleaning our property. 8 days without power, but at the end of the day we were lucky and I was really feeling for people up north. I couldnt have imagined what it would be like to lose everything to mother nature.

I think Yasi will always hold a place in my mind as probably the biggest cyclone I will see and Chase on the QLD coast in my lifetime. It didnt seem real. It was like YASI was so well modelled that a week out we knew something was coming. Crazy stuff.

Everything just went right for Yasi. She was unfortunatly made to hit the coast. Heres my little story for anyone that hasnt seen it before. Part 1 and 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26LtO9hPTbo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGfgZ97YSFM



Raindammit she changed my views on a few things. Thank God that she didnt hit Cairns or Townsville. I couldnt imagine and I dont want too.
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1185975 - 25/03/2013 11:14 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Things Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/11/2009
Posts: 8400
Loc: Blair Athol, SA
Even though we didn't really get the full brunt of Yasi here in Cairns, I gotta say, those downslope winds were outright scary. Was around 8pm or so when the winds really started to kick off, by that stage they were already at the point where you could lean into them and they'd support you. Steadily got stronger until about midnight, and by that stage Yasi was still heading directly West and almost looked like it was going to smash Cairns directly. At that stage the winds were insane, you could hear the freight train coming down the valley in huge gusts. In fact, I'd imagine it sounded pretty similar to what a tornado would, and that was always on the back of my mind.

The gusts were terrifying around 1am, which is when Yasi started showing signs of moving more to the SW and sparing Cairns of a direct hit, but the wind gusts were unbelievable. You could hear them roaring down the valley, middle of the night, lights flickering and power flashes everywhere (Surprisingly we kept power through the whole thing, except the next day when we lost it for about 8 hours), but the gusts came in huge bursts, seperated by about 30 seconds each.

I just stood there on the patio listening to the insane roaring, the sounds of things flapping widly in the wind, wondering what was lurking in the distance. When the gusts finally made it to you, you could see all the rain just change direction, it almost actually went back upwards, then the gust hit, and it basically flattened all the trees around you for a few seconds, and died off again.

I wouldn't say it was the scariest weather event I've experienced, after that <50m encounter with lightning early last year, but hearing those tornado like windgusts, with Yasi on the radar heading right for Cairns, I did get quite worried.

Although it may have changed the way people look at cyclones, I still look at them as the awesome power of nature, and would still experience one again. Definitely not a cat 5, and I wouldn't wish that on anyone, but it's the same as things like skydiving, you've gotta experience the best of it before you are really satisfied .. then some people just keep going back again and again.

Top
#1185977 - 25/03/2013 11:29 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dropbear Farmer Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 02/02/2011
Posts: 101
Loc: Daintree
Thanks for the read Trav smile
The roar of the wind, house shaking and trees breaking all around me in the rainforest in the dark is still crystal clear in my mind even now.
It was a long night and the surreal feeling of excitment but also a great fear doing the preps waiting for it to come and the days after is something I will always remember.
I had 6 avairy birds, 10 chickens and a rooster, 2 goats share the "bunker" with me, my wife and kids. Watching the behaviour of the animals they where [censored] scared and new that something was on its way.
The rainforest went totally dead silent that afternoon before yasi made landfall, so surreal and never seen it happen before.

Top
#1185978 - 25/03/2013 11:33 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Things Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/11/2009
Posts: 8400
Loc: Blair Athol, SA
Hah, weird, I noticed that too. I have some pet birds that were quiet all afternoon, usually they're being so noisy you want to put them outside!

I remember cops were going around telling kids playing on the street to go back inside, I was just standing outside that afternoon thinking about the beast just lurking off the coast, and indeed it was dead silent. No cars on the streets, no people anywhere, no bird noises, not even the dogs were barking. So weird.

Top
#1185980 - 25/03/2013 11:43 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville
We all have a story to tell. I have never been so nervous. Half the reason why was probably because I didn't know what to expect.
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1185985 - 25/03/2013 11:58 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Things Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/11/2009
Posts: 8400
Loc: Blair Athol, SA
I don't think anyone knew what to expect Trav, the media coverage was insane with how they were describing Yasi, it sounded like the end of the world.

Top
#1185999 - 25/03/2013 12:55 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Things]
ColdFront Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/06/2008
Posts: 18976
Loc: The Beach.
Originally Posted By: Things
Definitely not a cat 5, and I wouldn't wish that on anyone,


Spare a thought for those in WA that have been hit by cat 5 on 2-3 occasions Things. The reality is that the east coast will never compete with that side of the continent when it comes to severe TC's and I'm glad of the fact. You're too young to remember it but Vance is one that sticks in my mind. Cat 5 at landfall and blew a 40 foot shipping container 2 kilometres across the desert near Exmouth! He was still a cat 1 system sth west of Port Augusta in Bass Strait.

TC George was massive in size and cat 5 at land fall near Port Hedland. So was Joan, also near Port Hedland. They've had many.
_________________________
"water has c.30x the heat capacity of air. Someone drop the penny please for those fixated on the notion that the atmosphere is the driver ( preferably in 3D)".

Top
#1186004 - 25/03/2013 13:07 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville
Unfortunatly out of all these Category 5 systems across the Country, We still cannot rely on automatic weather stations to gather data.

best ones we have are from
Olivia
Vance
laurence ( from memory mandora recorded some 200+ wind gusts )
Larry - 294kmhr at Belinder Kerr, and south johnstone 200ish from memory.
Have to dig up what Tracy got to though.

Port Hedland's AWS died in George at like 150kmhr
Willis Island failed more than an hour before the worst stuff and got 185kmhr
Lucinda also failed in yasi at 170ish
Townsville malfunctioned at 135kmhr ( lucky we have a dines to back up the real figure )

Our Vantage Pro stood up to more wind than any of the BOMs equipment in recent years. I cant wait until we have the technology of the united States.

The BOM should just buy davis weather stations haha.


Edited by Trav Dog (25/03/2013 13:08)
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1186023 - 25/03/2013 13:52 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: ColdFront]
Things Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/11/2009
Posts: 8400
Loc: Blair Athol, SA
Originally Posted By: ColdFront
Originally Posted By: Things
Definitely not a cat 5, and I wouldn't wish that on anyone,


Spare a thought for those in WA that have been hit by cat 5 on 2-3 occasions Things. The reality is that the east coast will never compete with that side of the continent when it comes to severe TC's and I'm glad of the fact. You're too young to remember it but Vance is one that sticks in my mind. Cat 5 at landfall and blew a 40 foot shipping container 2 kilometres across the desert near Exmouth! He was still a cat 1 system sth west of Port Augusta in Bass Strait.

TC George was massive in size and cat 5 at land fall near Port Hedland. So was Joan, also near Port Hedland. They've had many.


That's true, they seem to get a severe system at least once every year. It's just good in that vast areas of the coastline aren't heavily populated, compared to QLD's.

Top
#1186026 - 25/03/2013 14:12 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Locke Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 27/12/2007
Posts: 4541
Loc: Brisbane
Trav, I think the maximum measured gust for TC Tracy was about 210kmh before it failed. Doesn't seem like the technology has improved at all in the past 40 years.
_________________________
This post and any other post by Locke is NOT an official forecast & should not be used as such. It's just my opinion & may or may not be backed by sound meteorological data. For official information, refer to Australian Bureau of Meteorology products.

Top
#1186028 - 25/03/2013 14:17 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville
Its unfortunate. Look at the Gulf of mexico and atlantic coastline. Literally thousands of automatic weather stations that seem capable of recording 100 mile an hour + wind gusts.

Quite sad really that most of ours fail at 80-90 knots.
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1186030 - 25/03/2013 14:19 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
ColdFront Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/06/2008
Posts: 18976
Loc: The Beach.
Originally Posted By: Things
Originally Posted By: ColdFront
Originally Posted By: Things
Definitely not a cat 5, and I wouldn't wish that on anyone,


Spare a thought for those in WA that have been hit by cat 5 on 2-3 occasions Things. The reality is that the east coast will never compete with that side of the continent when it comes to severe TC's and I'm glad of the fact. You're too young to remember it but Vance is one that sticks in my mind. Cat 5 at landfall and blew a 40 foot shipping container 2 kilometres across the desert near Exmouth! He was still a cat 1 system sth west of Port Augusta in Bass Strait.

TC George was massive in size and cat 5 at land fall near Port Hedland. So was Joan, also near Port Hedland. They've had many.


That's true, they seem to get a severe system at least once every year. It's just good in that vast areas of the coastline aren't heavily populated, compared to QLD's.


It's a blessing for them that it isn't "as heavily" populated but they face the exact same challenges when one is on the doorstep. A point seemingly forgotten over here.

It stands to reason however that with no disruption from land to the nth west feed that they do better in terms of strong systems. Notice Yasi was downgraded soon after she took a sudden kick to the sth west after interaction with our tablelands and slowed down. They don't like disruption. I read somewhere years ago that the systems heading west further nth tighten up once the air flowing over PNG starts starving them due to its very high altitude.

Meanwhile it is amazing when you look at the track maps just how many of WA's severe TC's actually originate in the waters between Darwin and Timor. Where as over here most that start close to our mainland head east, sth east or run parallel to the coast and the bad ones typically come from out towards the Fiji AOR.
_________________________
"water has c.30x the heat capacity of air. Someone drop the penny please for those fixated on the notion that the atmosphere is the driver ( preferably in 3D)".

Top
#1186034 - 25/03/2013 14:26 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dawgggg Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 25/03/2007
Posts: 23708
Loc: Townsville
WA also gets a much better window of opportunity to spin up massive tropical cyclones. The coral sea, bar 1-2 weeks a SEASON is a harsh place for any surface feauture.

Its probably Queenslands saving grace that Upper troughs move East during the summer months when land heating is at its maximum. This is the obvious reason why we see so many cyclones around March. The massive heating inland breaks down, with troughs becoming weaker and less strong. They also seem to not retrograde east as far as they usually do in december and january. The SEly trade wind kicks in and the sub tropical ridge situates itself over the coral sea.

This is what should happen in a normal year. This year was terrible and is the worst March that we have seen in years in relation to shear values in the coral sea.

WA will always have an advantage over QLD as the ridge situates itself right over inland Australia. The Lows spin up near darwin and Kimberly coastline, ride the exis of the ridge and turn poleward and hit the Pilbra. Short wave troughs etc and upper troughs can be present, but its a WAY less voliatile environement than the Coral sea.

I would be interested in knowing how often Atlantic type Hurricanes strike queensland like Yasi did. At a guess it must be every 50 or more years?
_________________________
2015/16 Storms
13 Storms 2500km travelled

Top
#1186087 - 25/03/2013 17:52 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Raindammit Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 14/02/2002
Posts: 13341
Loc: Townsville & Bilyana NQ
My story, which I shared toward the end of 2011. Yasi will haunt me for years to come.


Well, I guess I should share my story now as well.

I began taking an interest in Yasi just before the end of January as I was just about to go on leave for a month, and as usual would be spending a majority of my time up North.

I love going to Bilyana. It's my own little slice of FNQ paradise and after 2 and a half years of careful maintenance and attention, it was pretty much just how I wanted it. The rainforest was lush and mature, the creek (Deep Ck) pristine and wildlife was everywhere.

My leave officially started on Monday, 31 January so I drove up to Bilyana on the previous Friday afternoon looking forward to my leave.

At that stage Yasi barely existed as anything at all, but the models were consistently pushing quite a large system onto the coast by mid week, the impact area anywhere from about Cairns to Mackay.

It was certainly in the back of my mind that this was going to happen but I didn't think too seriously about it and was just excited along with everyone else that something was happening. What an exciting way to start my break I thought.

By Sunday, Yasi had developed into a category 2 system and began her long trek toward the QLD coast. The models were still all over the shop, but consistent in pushing her onto the coast by mid week. My partner drove up from Townsville on Sunday. He wasn't going to, but I convinced him to come as I thought that Yasi may not pose much of a threat to us, and we had plently of time to return to Townsville if need be. So up he came in his little white Honda Civic.

I continued to watch Yasi develop and by Monday night, she had acquired category 3 status, still well past 160E. I still wasn't too concerned.

Obviously others were (probably due to the media frenzy that had only just begun) but I started getting phone calls from friends/colleagues/family asking me for my thoughts about what may happen, seeing how I'm their local 'weather freak'.

I warned them that Yasi did pose a great risk due to her size, but I didn't think she would make it much past cat 3 status when she reached the coast. I advised them just to listen to the warnings and I would come back to Townsville if I needed to.

Secretly, I wanted to stay in Bilyana at all costs. I wanted to go through a cat 3, maybe even a low end cat 4 and by Tuesday morning the models were starting to narrow the impact area to between Townsville to Cairns. I was excited I was right in the middle of this area and couldn't wait to see what would happen.

By Tuesday afternoon, Yasi had intensified to a category 4. I received mroe and more texts and calls. I still wasn't too concerned, although I did decide then to clean up a bit more around the place and began making contact with Yvonne (GreenNLumpy) to see what she would be doing in the lead up to the cyclone.

Yvonne advised that she was excited and that they were going to have a heap of people there for the cyclone. I advised I might pop down (she is just outside of Cardwell) to say hello.

I was starting to get a little concerned. The BOM were hinting that Yasi could reach a category 5 and were desperately warning people to consider evacuating large chunks of the FNQ/NQ coastline.

On Tuesday evening, I noticed on the radar that Yasi was taking a more Westerly track and the expected impact area was MUCH closer to Cairns. I felt a little relieved, and excited. I figured if she hit Cairns I would be fine here. It would be a wet and windy ride (probably cat 3 winds in Bilyana) but we'd be OK. I suggested to Aaron that we go next door and have some 'cyclone drinks' and reassured him that although we are definitely not in the clear, I believed that we'd be OK.

Mick rang me and asked if I was coming back to Townsville. I told him my thoughts, he seemed quite perplexed and wished me luck. It's not often that Mick shows great concern in his voice, but he did that evening. I largely ignored it. I wanted to have fun! And I was so excited! So off to the neighbours Aaron and I went.

The night was clear and mostly still, except for a few low scuds moving through in the starlight. I remarked to my neighbours that 'you would never know there was a cyclone out there', they agreed. I advised them as well that if Yasi took the track that the BOM thought she would, we'd be OK.

By midnight, I was VERY drunk and Aaron and I walk back home. The night was still clear and still. I had a quick look at the latest warning on the net, Yasi was still supposed to head for Cairns although they had shifted her impact a tiny bit further South. I was excited to see what the morning would bring so I went to bed and crashed.

I woke up at 4am as a short sharp shower passed through. I noticed it was a bit breezy outside so I dragged myself out of bed and had a quick look at the latest warning. Yasi was now expected to cross near Innisfail as a category 5. Bilyana was now squarely in the very destructive zone. I realised in my very hungover stage that It probably wasn't very safe to stay anymore. I hoped that Yasi's impact area would shift North again, so I sat in front of my computer for the next 3 hours with a few cups of coffee, watching the radar and animated sat images to see if she would change direction.

By the 7am update, she was a category 5 and the impact zone was shifted further South to Tully. We had to leave.

I was not able to drive, so I suggested to Aaron that we can either leave my car here or his. He suggested we leave his there so I had to figure out where would be a safe place to put it. I knew that if Yasi crossed near Tully the strongest winds in Bilyana would be from the South/SE so I gave Aaron two options. Park it right up against the sheltered side of the house, or we could put it in the neighbours shed.

Aaron wanted it in the neighbours shed, so we went next store and they agreed for us to put it there with their own vehicles.

The sky had become overcast and the breeze was quite stiff. It began to dawn on me that what I am seeing right now is the last of the old Bilyana. I took Dax (my dog) for a quiet walk around the property one last time. There was still plenty of wildlife around, the birds were singing their usual morning songs and other than the breeze, things weren't too out of the ordinary.

As the time to leave got closer, I began to get extremely upset. I didn't want to go. I REALLY didn't want to go. It took some cajoling from Aaron and others via phone and text. They basically demanded that I left. Now.

So we did. As I was closing and padlocking our front gate, I rang my flatmate in Townsville and broke down. I sobbed uncontrollably, so much so that I was shocked at the 'shock' I was feeling. It was gut wrenching to finally get into the car and drive away. I looked out the back window to catch my last glimpse of the Bilyana I had fallen in love with...

By the time we had reached the Cardwell range, small sticks were already snapping off trees and rolling along the highway. We reached Townsville at 10:30am to find the airport was about to close and the Army/Police were evacuating people from exposed coastal suburbs.

I was still extremely upset and actually quietly prayed to whoever would listen, that somehow Bilyana would be OK.

By 7pm we had lost power in Townsville. It was VERY windy and the first of the larger trees were starting to break apart. I could see purple flashes in the distance as one by one, transformers began to fail. The familiar nighttime yellow/pink glow of Townsville reflecting off the clouds began to fade.

we received a text from our neighbours in Bilayna at 10pm saying they still had power, and although the wind was strong, 'it wasn't that bad'. We didn't hear from them again until the following morning.

I watched the radar on my iPhone. By 1am, the winds in Townsville were unbelievable. I never thought we would see the winds we were experiencing from Yasi. By this stage all the large trees in our yard had blown over, one crushing our fence. The smaller shrubs were starting to go as well and the house rattled and vibrated with each surge of the winds. We could hear debri bouncing off the walls of the house, and rolling across the roof.

The radar showed Yasi crossing straight over Mission Beach, her eye devouring Tully, Euramo and Murrigal and she lumbered inland. But not Bilyana. Bilyana was just outside the Southern eyewall as she moved in. I yelled profanities at my phone and could only begin to imagine what was happening there. There was no escaping it now. My property was probably being decimated by this bitch, house rainforest and all. I felt so helpless at that point.

By 6am the cyclone was still doing it's thing in Townsville as dawn began. We had tried to reach our neighbours on and off during the night but got now reply. However, at 7 am they finally texted to advise that they were OK but the place was a mess. The couldn't see my house but were going to go for a walk to see it if was still there...

I was sooooo anxious and waited with a mixture of pure dread and nausea for them to reply. They finally did, the house was OK but everything else was gone..

They then send a MMS of the rainforest. I could not believe it. Not a leaf was left. the entire rainforest, our 30 odd lychee trees were gone. Amazingly, most of the Cuban royal palms stood defiantly.

I was devastated. I thought I knew what this meant before Yasi, but I was made piercingly clear now was it REALLY meant. I sobbed uncontrollably again. I could not believe what had happened. I wouldn't accept it.

For the next few days, I was in a hazy sort of daze. We couldn't get up North as the road was shut. All I wanted to do was go up to Bilyana and see it with my own eyes.

On 8 February, the highway was opened to local traffic so off we went.

Ingham looked better than I thought it would, so did the Cardwell range.

About 20km South of Cardwell, the true force of Yasi began to show. Trees were stripped of bark and foliage. By Cardwell, the entire landscape was a uniform brown. No green. Cardwell had one lane of it's main road open. Large signs flashed 'DO NOT STOP IN CARDWELL'. I was silent in the car, although a few choice expletives came out as a slowly drove on and saw the devastation.

North of Cardwell seemed to be worse. No green, just brown 'sticks' poking up from the ground. Sheet metal and household objects were stuck high up in trees. Road signs were flat.

I was totally disoriented by the time we reached the turn-off to Bilyana, such was the change in the landscape.

As we pulled into the driveway, the mango trees and lychee trees were a tangled, buckled mess. As I feared the entire rainforest had been shredded. Amazingly, the house only had a few bumps and bruises, it looked so surreal standing there intact amongst the devastation. I walked around and took photos.

Aarons car had been crushed in the neighbours shed.

For the next several months, we cleaned up by ourselves. It was back breaking work but we had to do it.

I've said it before, Yasi has changed me. I still recoil and get upset when I think about what has happened and I am now genuinely fearful of another cyclone coming. I never want to go through this again. Ever.

Bilyana has dramtically fought back. The rainforest is growing rapidly and honestly you'd be hard pressed to know just how badly it damaged it was by Yasi.

But the old Bilyana is gone forever, and so is part if myself..
_________________________
Belgian Gardens, Townsville NQ
Bilyana FNQ

Top
#1186130 - 25/03/2013 21:37 Re: Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (SPAC, Coral Sea) - 29/01/11 - 3/2/11 - General Chat [Re: Mick10]
Dropbear Farmer Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 02/02/2011
Posts: 101
Loc: Daintree
Thanks for your story Raindamnit. Love to hear more of them from others. smile

Re Rainforest.

Don't need to worry about that, It always grows back better than before. I am sure the Daintree has had quite a few nasty ones of the millions of years it has stood.

Fruit trees on the other hand are painfull to replace. frown


Edited by Dropbear Farmer (25/03/2013 21:38)

Top
Page 356 of 358 < 1 2 ... 354 355 356 357 358 >


Who's Online
4 registered (Knot, slipperyfish, 2 invisible), 65 Guests and 3 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Today's Birthdays
KiwiSonia, paul117, peterh, ringwood weather, Shauno, Simmo FNQ, warm front
Forum Stats
29914 Members
32 Forums
24132 Topics
1524049 Posts

Max Online: 2985 @ 26/01/2019 12:05
Satellite Image