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#1343847 - 14/10/2015 01:37 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1949 Sunday 17th and Monday 18th July (cont)

Oops - I gave an incorrect link to an image of a weather map in one of the above 1949 articles. Here is the article including the weather map this time.

News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Monday 18 July 1949 Page 14.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130264135

"HAIL AND HIGHLAND SNOW STATE WEATHER FORECAST (issued at noon).—Further showers, with occasional hail and highland snow in the settled areas and adjacent parts of the interiors. Cold squally south-west to south winds: gales on south-east coast. CITY.—Frequent showers. Cold squally south-west winds. OCEAN.—Moderate northerly winds in western approaches of Bass Strait and Tasmanian waters. Strong to gale south to south-west winds South Australian waters east from long. 135 deg. E.( with very rough seas. Moderating winds to westward, becoming east to north-east west of the Bight and slight to moderate seas. NORTHERN BIGHT WATERS.-Moderate to fresh south-west to south winds. Moderate seas."



The day of the date on the weather map accompanying the above text is hard to read with confidence but looks to me like 18 ie Monday 18th. Saturday 16th's weather map is here http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/74644434 .
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#1343882 - 14/10/2015 11:21 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
paisley Offline
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Registered: 27/11/2001
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Loc: Magill campus Uni SA (w) & Fir...
I love those early synoptic charts. Once the theory of fronts became accepted they started drawing them everywhere! I doubt a similar synoptic situation today would result in a similar looking chart. (any comments from those in the know?)

Of course, maybe the weather WAS different back then, we certainly know that snow making situations were more frequent.

P

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#1343922 - 14/10/2015 16:33 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
macbenoy Offline
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Registered: 22/10/2013
Posts: 10
Loc: South Australia
To see the entry in the Colonial Weather Office weather folios for that date , see http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/18960713.html.

Click one of the 2 image thumbnails then click in the chosen image (when it appears) to blow it up or use ctrl-mousewheel.
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#1343924 - 14/10/2015 16:38 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: paisley]
macbenoy Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 22/10/2013
Posts: 10
Loc: South Australia
a full range of SA-published Australian colonial synoptic charts and Australia-wide newsclippings is available at http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios (26,000 images), covering when maps were agreed as a way to express a weather synopsis (1881) until 1905 when the colonial weather offices were federalised. Our citizen science team has imaged Australia synoptic charts up to 1950 and will be web-publishing all 80,000 images sometime in the next 2 years. Only the NOAA can better this continuous 77+ year run.


Edited by macbenoy (14/10/2015 16:43)
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#1343958 - 15/10/2015 03:40 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
Thanks for posting Phil and Mac smile Re "maybe the weather WAS different back then" Charles was not to know it but the first decade of the 20th century may well have been the snowiest in SA's recorded history to this day, with at least three snow events that were all much bigger than any events in the 21st century to date. A bonanza for snowchasers but coming from England Charles probably took it all in stride.

Once the telegraph network flourished in South Australia so did the reporting of weather events such as snowfalls, in the newspapers of the day. The biggest papers had many correspondents scattered around the towns sending in reports, put into print for everyone interested to read within a week or so of events occurring. I haven't looked into the history of this practice of numerous correspondents reporting in from the countryside, but it seems to have faded in the twentieth century and this invaluable public source of information was lost.
Now we have a new infrastructure and network to do this again, with computers and the internet and digital cameras and other wonders of modern technology and a much bigger population. We could build a "new generation" network of public reporting of weather events from observant people around the state, process it to present the most relevant information, and have it accessible to everyone interested almost as it happens. We seem to be heading in that direction but from my perspective it's in rather a state of happy chaos at present smile I imagine Charles Todd would be in his element here, developing visions and turning them into practical reality.
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#1348829 - 16/11/2015 02:28 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1879: widespread snowfall during overnight darkness Wednesday 23rd into Thursday 24th July 1879.

July 23-24 1879 : extensive overnight snowfall, heaviest in Mid-North and Flinders Ranges, also reports from southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Rare wind direction for SA snow - from south-east to east. Another rare feature was that snow on a few of the highest northern range tops persisted for days.

This snowfall stands out from most other falls I've investigated, firstly for the wind direction which when mentioned was variously reported as south-easterly or easterly, and secondly for the local persistence of the snow-cover. The persistence was topped by this extraordinary claim: "Mount Bryan West, August 13. Snow fell here on the evening and night of the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which remained on the ranges over fourteen clear days". There was a much lighter fall on August 4th which may have contributed.

Another rather tantalising reference, this time to the wind on the night before the night of the fall, is this report: "EDEOWIE, July 28. On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance."

I don't recall another snow event I've reported on so far (15th November 2015), where the wind has been reported as from south-east or east.

Now, here is a summary of what I found in a search of Trove and also the Charles Todd weather reports relating to the event, so readers won't need to wade through numerous articles and their associated sources. In the next post is Appendix 1 which is a detailed compilation of what I found and you can safely ignore Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report.

Unless otherwise stated all text below from newspaper articles is quoted from Trove after being corrected. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted only the snow-relevant text from each published article.

Southern Mount Lofty Ranges

I was only able to find a handful of reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps most smaller towns in the hills were not yet connected to Adelaide telegraphically, or perhaps it was mostly a Mid-North - Flinders Ranges fall. I'm inclined to think based on the few reports I did find, that snow probably fell widely in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges, but not as widely as it has in some of the biggest southern Mount Lofty Ranges falls in our recorded history. Whereas on the high ground of the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges it appears to have been considerably heavier and may have been in the top ten Mid-North - Flinders Ranges falls.

Here are the Charles Todd weather maps for 23rd and 24th July 1879. They are sourced from "Todd Weather Folios 1879-1909" on the website http://charlestodd.net. "Charles Todd and his meteorological staff maintained daily weather folios for 32 years, between 1879-1909. ... The folios represent a detailed contemporary view of weather of the day as determined by South Australia's weather professionals, and as detailed mainly in the press of the day" {quote from charlestodd.net}. So this was their first year.

The direct links to these two images and associated text are:
http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790723t01_hi-res.jpg
http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790724t01_hi-res.jpg

They report that Alice Springs received four and a half inches of rain in the 48 hours to 9am on the 23rd. This may be another indication besides the south-east to easterly wind direction that this was quite an unusual snow-producing weather system.

Now, elsewhere in the newspapers:

"There was a heavy fall of snow on the Mount Lofty Range early on Thursday morning. Mr. Percival, of Summertown, states that in the neighbourhood of that township the ground was covered with snow, which in some places lay at least a foot deep. The roofs of the houses and all vegetables were white with it, reminding old people of the appearance of houses and trees in England durmg the winter season, and which in this sunny climate they had almost forgotten. Our Stirling East correspondent, writing on July 24, says :—Mount Lofty presented a most wintry appearance this morning, mantled with snow. The trees, shrubs and flowers looked quite natural to the Englishborn Australians, but were an astonishment to the young gumsuckers. The snow is falling fast while I am writing.""

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"The winter has been remarkably cold. Although there has been no snow in Adelaide abundance has fallen in the hills within a few miles, trees and house roofs being as white as in the old country. In various parts of the north the fall was much heavier. During a very severe night three men lost themselves in a snow storm; one perished and the other two were discovered in an insensible condition. This was quite an unexampled occurrence in South Australia."

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"Latest News.
FALL OF SNOW.—This morning Mr. Thompson, driver of the Mount Barker coach, brought to Adelaide a genuine snowball, measuring four teen inches in diameter, which had been made at Crafers, where there had been a heavy fall of snow. Mr. Thompson informs us that the snow was lying quite four inches deep on the Mount Barker-road. The ball, which was first of all brought to this office and afterwards shown in Mr. Eyens' shop, King William-street, attracted considerable notice, got only from colonials, to whom the sight was a novel one, but from people who had lived in the old-country, and who were thus forcibly reminded of days long past, when with healthy frames and eager spirits they engaged in the winter pastime of snowballing. Our telegrams intimate that in several directions in the North there have been heavy falls of snow. At Summertown we are informed the snow at places was fully a foot thick, and the hills near the Montacute are quite white with the fall."

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"Mr. WEST-ERSKINE, M.P., said that others had been coming up with the deputation, but he believed had been prevented by the weather, as eight miles of the road from Crafer's towards Hahndorf was covered with snow."

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{The wording below suggests that snow was not seen falling in Meadows on 23rd-24th July 1879 nor seen on the ground. Or if it was it didn't come to the attention of the newspaper's correspondent(s) in Meadows. - Miles}

Meadows, July 28
"The weather has been extremely cold of late, and although we have not e--n favoured with a snow storm, ice has not been denied us. and severe frosts have been neither few nor far between ... "

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Mid-North and Flinders Ranges

I found many articles reporting snow at one or more locations in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges regions. Most of the relevant text is in the summary below.

James Butler aged 18 perished outdoors during the snowfall near Jamestown on the night of 23rd July 1879. I don't know but he may have the distinction of being the first and perhaps the only person in South Australia since colonisation of dying of exposure outdoors during a snowfall. Two companions survived albeit very drunk and apparently asleep when James Butler aged 18 moved away from their horse-drawn conveyance and died. The subsequent inquest decided death had resulted from cold and exposure. Some questions will remain forever unanswered. There's a newspaper account of the events and the subsequent inquest here James Butler.

Now to the summary.

The weather on Wednesday was unusually cold. There were heavy falls of snow at Jamestown, Hallett, and the Burra.

Jamestown, July 23. To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east.
[Later Telegram.]
Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and
rain.

Jamestown, July 24. The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.

JAMESTOWN, July 24. The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.

TARCOWIE. July 29. The weather for the last few weeks has been very cold and wet. On Wednesday last about sundown it commenced to snow, and at 10 o'clock the snow was on the ground in the township 2 inches thick; on the Hogshead and Manannarrie Ranges, I am informed, it averaged 18 inches.

Appila Yarrowie, July 24. A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Ranges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.

Terowie, July 24. A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.

TEROWIE, July 24. Last night we had a heavy fall of snow. The whole of yesterday was bitterly cold, with a keen south-east wind. At about 8 o'clock it commenced snowing, and kept up till about 10. The snow was about a foot in depth against the exposed sides of houses. This morning the hills to the west were covered in snow, which, with the dark streaks caused by the ridges of stone, present a beautiful sight.

Farrell's Flat, July 24. We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J .P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.

FARRELL'S FLAT. Since my last we have been visited with a good fall of snow, and for the first time snowballing was carried on here in the streets. The fall was heavy here but it must have been a great deal heavier further up the line, as trucks on the goods train from Hallett were partly covered with the white visitor. As a matter of course the weather was intensely cold with a sharp frost, and very little change has taken place in the atmosphere since. The crops and grass continue to look as well as can reasonably be expected considering the cold weather we have experienced lately.

WILMINGTON, July 24. We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.

LAURA, July 29. Next to the rops comes the weather, which has been extremely cold. We did not have a fall of snow in the township, but the tops of the hills only a few miles away were quite white with it. The sight of the snow on the Mannanarie hills, fully twenty miles distant, greatly pleased those who saw it, many never having, seen snow-covered hills before. Commercial gentlemen arriving from further north profess to have had strange experiences in the snow, the relation of which tested our credulity to the utmost. We are now having fine days, but the mornings and nights are still very cold.

LAURA, July 24. The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura. Steady soaking showers fell last night.

CALTOWIE, July 24. Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.

CLARE, July 24. A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.

BLINMAN, July 24. Splendid rains have fallen since Tuesday night. The total quantity is over half an inch. High winds prevailed till last night, carrying away the back verandah of the Post-Office, also damaging other verandahs and roofs.

BURRA, July 23, 10.15 p.m. The weather to-day was the coldest known by the oldest resident. Rain commenced this afternoon, and is steadily continuing. Snow commenced falling at about 9 o'clock this evening, and still continues. Large quantities have fallen up to the present time.

HALLETT, July 23. The weather has been bitterly cold all day, and snow is now falling fast.

Hallett, July 24. There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.

The Weather and the Crops in the Areas.—Mr. James Shakes (of Messrs. Liston, Shakes, & Co.), who has recently returned from a trip to the North, has kindly furnished us with the following interesting particulors:—" ... On Wednesday at Quorn it rained from about half-past 10 in the morning to daylight next morning, and by the appearance of the country there must have been nearly an inch, and as it came from the south-east and east the plains would be sure to participate in the welcome downfall on Thursday morning. Whilst on the way by tram from Quorn to Port Augusta a pleasing sight presented itself. Mount Brown and the Mount Arden Ranges were beautifully capped with snow, causing at Port Augusta and the neighbourhood quite a sensation, the experience of the settlers in regard to colonial snow having been of a rather disagreeable nature, requiring to be washed off with water and occasionally down with sundry half-pints of XXX or other exhilarating beverage. On the road back and when on the range near Canowie, Mount Bryan and the Razorback presented a sight which to a colonial like myself will be long remembered, the whole being covered with snow several feet in thickness. The weather the whole distance from Kapunda to Quorn and Port Augusta was intensely cold."

A correspondent at the Burra, writing on July 24, says:—"On Monday last the wind changed round from the west, from which quarter it had been hlowing for a long time, to the east, and on Wednesday the cold became intense. Almost everyone remarked that it was cold enough for snow, and big coats and wrappers were freely used all day. Several old hands declared that they would rather have hot winds. At about 7 p.m. the storm increased, with a few drops of rain, but it soon began to snow, and for more than three hours there was a driving snowstorm, which it was almost impossible to face; in some places where the snow beat against walls, roofs, and fences it became a hard solid mass. This morning the hills were capped with the pure white snow, and being such a novelty it naturally created excitement amongst those who have never been in the old country. I met with a man who had to face the storm for a mile, and he said that although he had lived in England twenty winters he never felt the cold so severe before. He could only go a few yards without turning his back to the weather. He felt it cutting his eyes, ears, and face to such an extent that he had to cover his face and feel his way along by the fence; when he reached home he had flakes of ice on his coat and hat. The weather has greatly moderated."

EDEOWIE, July 28. On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance.

PEKINA, July 29. We had a fine fall of snow here on Wednesday last, some of it laying on the ground till Sunday.

Melrose, July 24. Heavy rain fell yesterday. Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.

MELROSE, July 30. Last week we had two days snow in the Mount, and the weather was very cold. Since then we are having genial seasonable weather.

Melrose, July 25. The Flinders Range presented a beautiful appearance yesterday. The tops were covered with snow for 30 miles from south of Mount Remarkable to north of Mount Brown. At noon to-day snow was still on the summit of Mount Remarkable.

Mintaro Snowstorm.— A beautiful sight was to be witnessed from Mintaro on Thursday morning, July 24. The Flagstaff Hill, near Black Springs, being covered with snow to the depth of several inches.

"YATINA. July 23. We have had extremely cold weather for the last ten days with a very drying wind from the north- west. To-day we had a good fall of rain, sleet, and snow. ...

MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13.
Snow fell here on the evening and night of
the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which
remained on the ranges over fourteen clear
days. In Banbury ward, hundreds of gums,
peppermints, and sheeoaks had a quantity of
limbs and branches broken down with snow
and are now to be seen. On the morning
of the 24th ult, icicles from 10 to 14 inches long
were suspended at the bottom of every
hollow of the iron that covered our kitchen in
which we had a large fire all night and the heat
must have melted the snow on the roof during
the night, other places covered with iron had
no ice on them. The ground was covered
with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and
was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th.

MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. July 31. The weather has been much warmer during the last few days. Yesterday and today have been like spring. The warmth has improved the appearance of the wheat and grass, although they are very backward. There are still a few patches of snow on the Range, but it has shrunk a good deal during the past two days. It looks strange to see snow on the hills and feel the weather quite warm.

MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 28. [This was published on Friday 1 August so June 28 should be July 28 - Miles]
Since my last we have had some splendd weather, though at times very cold and frosty and there has been a splendid fall of rain and snow. The snow began to fall about 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening, and lasted for more than five hours; the ground was covered three or four inches deep, the hills were covered for thirty-six hours afterwards, and there is snow on Mount Bryan Range at the present time. There has not been such a f.ll up here for something like eighteen years as there was last Wednesday night.

BLACK SPRINGS, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
On Monday [this is most likely a mistake by the writer and it should be Wednesday - Miles], at about half-past 7 o'clock, it commenced to snow heavily, and lasted for several hours. Some of the snow remained on the hilltops for several days. It was the heaviest fall of snow that has taken place for many years in this part. The weather is now fine, but very frosty.

LAUNCELOT, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
We experienced a heavy fall of snow on Wednesday night [Wed 23rd July - Miles], and on the following morning the ground was covered two inches in depth.

BLACK ROCK PLAIN. July 28. During the early part of last week the weather was extremely cold, which resulted on Wednesday night in a heavy fall of rain and snow. On Thursday morning the surrounding hills presented a grand spectacle in their white robes, strongly reminding a person of the old country.

APPILA. July 25. A public meeting was held at Appila-Yarrowie on July 23 to discuss the working of the present Land Act. ... The meeting was a thoroughly representative one, notwithstanding the severity of the weather. It rained steadily during the evening, with a strong easterly wind, which was almost unbearably cold; but notwithstanding this drawback many persons came from a long distance, showing thereby the lively interest which was taken in the proceedings.
On Thursday morning a grand sight was visible from this place. The Mannanarie ranges were covered with snow, and it did not entirely disappear until this evening.

RIVERTON July 28, 1879. Things are as dull as ever here. Every one complains of the cold, and not without reason, as on Wednesday last [23rd - Miles] we had a fall of snow at Macaw Creek, about three miles south of Riverton.

YACKA. July 28. In common with other parts of the colony we have had a continuance of wet and cold weather, but the snow storms that visited different places in the North did not reach this township. I am told by old residents that they never experienced such cold weather before in Australia.

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In the next post is APPENDIX 1: DETAILS OF JULY 23-24 SNOW REPORTS. It's the detail of the reports I found and summarized in this post (above) and you can safely ignore Appendix 1 unless you're doing an investigation of this snow event or you want to check out something specific.

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#1348830 - 16/11/2015 03:46 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
APPENDIX 1 : DETAILS OF 1879 JULY 23-24 SNOW REPORTS.

Most of the information below is summarized in the previous post so you can safely ignore this detailed report unless you're doing an investigation of this snow event or you want to check out something specific.


Below are details of the reports I found from an extensive but by no means complete search of the newpapers on the Trove database and also some information gathered from the Charles Todd folios. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted below only the snow-relevant text from each published article.

Firstly here are links to the Charles Todd folios including weather maps for 23rd and 24th July 1879. The snow fell overnight 23rd-24th. They are sourced from "Todd Weather Folios 1879-1909" on the website http://charlestodd.net. "Charles Todd and his meteorological staff maintained daily weather folios for 32 years, between 1879-1909. ... The folios represent a detailed contemporary view of weather of the day as determined by South Australia's weather professionals, and as detailed mainly in the press of the day" {quote from charlestodd.net}.

The direct links to these two folios with weather maps and text are:
http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790723t01_hi-res.jpg
http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790724t01_hi-res.jpg

They report Alice Springs received four and a half inches of rain in the 48 hours to 9am on the 23rd. This may be another indicaton besides the wind blowing from the south-east to east that it was quite an unusual weather system.

Southern Mount Lofty Ranges.

I was only able to find a handful of reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps most smaller towns in the hills were not yet connected to Adelaide telegraphically, or perhaps it was mostly a Mid-North-Flinders Ranges fall. Light snow may not have been seen in the wee small hours and may have melted pretty quickly on the ground.

I'm inclined to think based on the few reports I did find, that snow probably fell widely in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges, but not nearly as widely as it has in the biggest southern Mount Lofty Ranges falls in our recorded history. Whereas on the high ground of the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges it appears to have been considerably heavier and may have been in the top ten Mid-North Flinders Ranges falls.
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373313

There was a heavy fall of snow on the Mount Lofty Range early on Thursday morning. Mr. Percival, of Summertown, states that in the neighbourhood of that township the ground was covered with snow, which in some places lay at least a foot deep. The roofs of the houses and all vegetables were white with it, reminding old people of the appearance of houses and trees in England durmg the winter season, and which in this sunny climate they had almost forgotten. Our Stirling East correspondent, writing on July 24, says :—Mount Lofty presented a most wintry appearance this morning, mantled with snow. The trees, shrubs and flowers looked quite natural to the Englishborn Australians, but were an astonishment to the young gumsuckers. The snow is falling fast while I am writing.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293172
APA citation
The Advertiser. FRIDAY, JULY 25,1879. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373744

The winter has been remarkably cold. Although there has been no snow in Adelaide abundance has fallen in the hills within a few miles, trees and house roofs being as white as in the old country. In various parts of the north the fall was much heavier. During a very severe night three men lost themselves in a snow storm; one perished and the other two were discovered in an insensible condition. This was quite an unexampled occurrence in South Australia.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373744
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293284
APA citation
The Advertiser SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1879. (1879, August 9). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373744

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728211

Latest News.
FALL OF SNOW.—This morning Mr. Thompson, driver of the Mount Barker coach, brought to Adelaide a genuine snowball, measuring four teen inches in diameter, which had been made at Crafers, where there had been a heavy fall of snow. Mr. Thompson informs us that the snow was lying quite four inches deep on the Mount Barker-road. The ball, which was first of all brought to this office and afterwards shown in Mr. Eyens' shop, King William-street, attracted considerable notice, got only from colonials, to whom the sight was a novel one, but from people who had lived in the old-country, and who were thus forcibly reminded of days long past, when with healthy frames and eager spirits they engaged in the winter pastime of snowballing. Our telegrams intimate that in several directions in the North there have been heavy falls of snow. At Summertown we are informed the snow at places was fully a foot thick, and the hills near the Montacute are quite white with the fall.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728211
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
Latest News. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728211

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728230

Mr. WEST-ERSKINE, M.P., said that others had been coming up with the deputation, but he believed had been prevented by the weather, as eight miles of the road from Crafer's towards Hahndorf was covered with snow.

The article doesn't say when the road was covered with snow - Miles.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728230
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
DEPUTATION. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728230

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{The wording below suggests that snow was not seen falling in Meadows on 23rd-24th July 1879 nor seen on the ground. Or if it was it didn't come to the attention of the newspaper's correspondent(s) in Meadows.}

Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954) Thursday 7 August 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96890847

Country Intelligence.
(From own our Correspondents.)
Meadows, July 28
The weather has been extremely cold of late, and although we have not e--n favoured with a snow storm, ice has not been denied us. and severe frosts have been neither few nor far between ...

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96890847
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9483286
APA citation
Country Intelligence. (1879, August 7). Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96890847

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Mid-North and Flinders Ranges.

I found many articles reporting snow at one or more locations in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges regions. Extracts from the first few newspaper articles below contain telegrams from multiple towns, so there is considerable duplication as some telegrams were sent to more than one newspaper or newspapers reprinted other newspapers' telegrams or reports.
I've embolded the names of the towns the telegrams originated from. Most, but not all, of these embolded towns reported snow in the towns or-and in nearby hills or ranges.

So here are the articles I found on Trove that reported snow in the Mid-North and-or the Flinders Ranges, but note that the search was not a complete one.
South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43098871

WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.
Gladstone, July 24.
Fine seasonable rains fell in our district las night. The gauge shows a fall of 0.280 in. The crops are looking exceedingly well notwithstanding the bitterly cold and frosty weather we have experienced.
Jamestown, July 24. The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Appila Yarrowie, July 24. A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Ranges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.
Quorn, July 24. We have had 24 hours' splendid soaking rain, and the sky is still overcast, giving promise of more wet.
Hallett, July 24. There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.
Terowie, July 24. A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.
Melrose, July 24. Heavy rain fell yesterday.
Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.
Farrell's Flat, July 24. We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J .P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24. The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43098871
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3997559
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 25). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43098871

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160122932

WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.
Jamestown, July 23.
To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east.
[Later Telegram.] Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and rain.
Jamestown, July 24.
The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Appila Yarrowie, July 24.
A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Banges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing, and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.
Hallett, July 24.
There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.
Terowie, July 24.
A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.
Melrose, July 24.
Heavy rain fell yesterday. Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.
Farrell's Flat, July 24.
We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the properly of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J.P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24.
The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160122932
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18907918
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 26). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 4. Retrieved November 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160122932

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967370

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.

GLADSTONE, July 24. The weather keeps very cold. Some nice showers of rain fell through the night, and the weather is still unsettled.
JAMESTOWN, July 24. The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.
WILMINGTON, July 24. We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.
LAURA, July 24. The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura. Steady soaking showers fell last night. The crops all around are looking splendid.
CALTOWIE, July 24. Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.
FARRELL'S FLAT, July 24. Last night we were visited with a heavy fall of snow. A hill on Mr. P. Dowd's estate is covered. The weather is severely cold.
CLARE, July 24. A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.
BLINMAN, July24. Splendid rains have fallen since Tuesday night. The total quantity is over half an inch. High winds prevailed till last night, carrying away the back verandah of the Post-Office, also damaging other verandahs and roofs.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967370
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429384
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967370

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 p 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373295

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.
FARRELL'S FLAT July 24.
Last night we were visited with a heavy fall of snow. A hill on Mr. P. Dowd's estate is covered. The weather is severely cold.
CLARE, July 24. A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.
JAMESTOWN, July 24. The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.
WILMINGTON, July 24. We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.
LAURA, July 24. The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura.
CALTOWIE, July 24. Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373295
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293173
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 6. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373295

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728228

PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS.
THE WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.
Gladstone, July 24.
Fine seasonable rains fell in our district last night. The gauge shows a fall of 0f 280 in. The crops are looking exceedingly well notwithstanding the bitterly cold and frosty weather we have experienced.
Farrell's Flat, July 24.
We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J. P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24.
The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.
Jamestown, July 24. The hills are sheeted with snow this morning; over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Quorn, July 24.
We have had 4 hours' splendid soaking rain, and the sky is still overcast, giving promise of more wet.
Melrose, July 24. Heavy rain fell yesterday.
Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728228
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728228

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 22. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93968867
TARCOWIE, July 29. The weather for the last few weeks has been very cold and wet. On Wednesday last about sundown it commenced to snow, and at 10 o'clock the snow was on the ground in the township 2 inches thick; on the Hogshead and Manannarrie Ranges, I am informed, it averaged 18 inches.
Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93968867
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429413
APA citation
TARCOWIE, JULY 29. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved November 12, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93968867

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967257

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.
BURRA, July 23, 10.15 p.m. The weather to-day was the coldest known by the oldest resident. Rain commenced this afternoon, and is steadily continuing. Snow commenced falling at about 9 o'clock this evening, and still continues. Large quantities have fallen up to the present time.
HALLETT, July 23. The weather has been bitterly cold all day, and snow is now falling fast.
JAMESTOWN, July 23. It has been bitterly cold all day. A heavy snowstorm is now falling.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967257
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429370
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 7. Retrieved October 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967257

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373313

A correspondent at the Burra, writing on July 24, says:—"On Monday last the wind changed round from the west, from which quarter it had been hlowing for a long time, to the east, and on Wednesday the cold became intense. Almost everyone remarked that it was cold enough for snow, and big coats and wrappers were freely used all day. Several old hands declared that they would rather have hot winds. At about 7 p.m. the storm increased, with a few drops of rain, but it soon began to snow, and for more than three hours there was a driving snowstorm, which it was almost impossible to face; in some places where the snow beat against walls, roofs, and fences it became a hard solid mass. This morning the hills were capped with the pure white snow, and being such a novelty it naturally created excitement amongst those who have never been in the old country. I met with a man who had to face the storm for a mile, and he said that although he had lived in England twenty winters he never felt the cold so severe before. He could only go a few yards without turning his back to the weather. He felt it cutting his eyes, ears, and face to such an extent that he had to cover his face and feel his way along by the fence; when he reached home he had flakes of ice on his coat and hat. The weather has greatly moderated.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293172
APA citation
The Advertiser. FRIDAY, JULY 25,1879. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Thursday 24 July 1879 page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373261

The Advertiser. THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1879.
The weather on Wednesday was unusually cold. There were heavy falls of snow at Jamestown, Hallett, and the Burra.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373261
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293162
APA citation
The Advertiser. THURSDAY, JULY 24,1879. (1879, July 24). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373261

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Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197576064

{quoting snow-relevant text and text about a destructive wind gust at EDEOWIE]

EDEOWIE, July 28.
On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance.
PEKINA, July 29. We had a fine fall of snow here on Wednesday last, some of it laying on the ground till Sunday.
MELROSE, July 30. Last week we had two days snow in the Mount, and the weather was very cold. Since then we are having genial seasonable weather.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576064
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22356419
APA citation
COUNTRY LETTERS. (1879, August 1). Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880), p. 8. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576064

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43091403

Jamestown, July 23. To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east. [Later Telegram.] Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091403
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3998001
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 24). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091403

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 22.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967391

TEROWIE, July 24.
Last night we had a heavy fall of snow. The whole of yesterday was bitterly cold, with a keen south-east wind. At about 8 o'clock it commenced snowing, and kept up till about 10. The snow was about a foot in depth against the exposed sides of houses. This morning the hills to the west were covered in snow, which, with the dark streaks caused by the ridges of stone, present a beautiful sight. — Farmers are busy fallowing, and all expect a good harvest.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967391
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429385
APA citation
TEROWIE, July 24. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved October 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967391

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497713

Snowstorm.— A beautiful sight was to be witnessed from Mintaro on Thursday morning, July 24. The Flagstaff Hill, near Black Springs, being covered with snow to the depth of several inches.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497713
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658384
APA citation
No title. (1879, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497713

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This snippet starting "SNOW" doesn't say what location it's referring to but I think it's likely to be Burra. There's a brief section of text immediately above it headed "Burra Hospital."

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 25 July 1879 p 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35951278

SNOW. — The weather has again changed and we have had it bitterly cold and wet. On Wednesday night there was a fall of snow which was still on the hills on Thursday morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35951278
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740485
APA citation
District Courts Bill. (1879, July 25). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35951278

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728248

Latest Telegrams
PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS.
SNOW IN THE NORTH
Melrose, July 25.
The Flinders Range presented a beautiful appearance yesterday. The tops were covered with snow for 30 miles from south of Mount Remarkable to north of Mount Brown. At noon to-day snow was still on the summit of Mount Remarkable.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728248
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392579
APA citation
Latest Telegrams. (1879, July 25). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728248

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 22.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967412

YATINA. July 23.
We have had extremely cold weather for the last ten days with a very drying wind from the north- west. To-day we had a good fall of rain, sleet, and snow. ...

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967412
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429385
APA citation
YATINA, July 23. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967412

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{Below is an extraordinary report from Mount Bryan West! The writer reports "Snow fell here on the evening and night of the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which remained on the ranges over fourteen clear days." The writer also reports that "The ground was covered with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th." According to my calculations, 14 clear days from the evening and night of the 23rd July takes us to the evening and night of the 6th August. From the evening and night of the 23rd July to the evening and night of the 3rd August is 11 clear days without any reported additional falls of snow, then we have one reported snowfall on 4th to take us to the 14 clear days., when there was another fall covering the ground by 5pm. I don't recall seeing any any other periods reported in the South Australian snowfalls I've investigated where some snow remained in patches as long as 10 clear days unassisted or 14 clear days assisted!}

{For reasons unknown, Trove's electronically translated text of this newspaper article is uncharacteristically poor, whereas I found it relatively easy to read most of it. I've not been able to find this article in any other paper on the Trove database or anywhere else on the internet. I didn't correct the electronically translated text. I'm confident my reading of the article is accurate in all important details. Here it is, and below this is a screen-grab of Trove's digital image of microfilm of the article.}
Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 15 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35950478

MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13.
Snow fell here on the evening and night of
the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which
remained on the ranges over fourteen clear
days. In Banbury ward, hundreds of gums,
peppermints, and sheeoaks had a quantity of
limbs and branches broken down with snow
and are now to be seen. On the morning
of the 24th ult, icicles from 10 to 14 inches long
were suspended at the bottom of every
hollow of the iron that covered our kitchen in
which we had a large fire all night and the heat
must have melted the snow on the roof during
the night, other places covered with iron had
no ice on them. The ground was covered
with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and
was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th.
Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35950478
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740497
APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13. (1879, August 15). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 10, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35950478

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35948774
CORRESPONDENCE.
(From our own Correspondents.)
MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 28. [This was published on Friday 1 August so June 28 should be July 28 - Miles]
Since my last we have had some splendd weather, though at times very cold and frosty and there has been a splendid fall of rain and snow. The snow began to fall about 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening, and lasted for more than five hours; the ground was covered three or four inches deep, the hills were covered for thirty-six hours afterwards, and there is snow on Mount Bryan Range at the present time. There has not been such a f.ll up here for something like eighteen years as there was last Wednesday night.
Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35948774
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740490
APA citation
CORRESPONDENCE. (1879, August 1). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved November 11, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35948774

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Published Saturday 2nd August, written Monday 28th July, so "On Monday" would refer to Monday 21st July. This is likely an error on the part of the writer, as elsewhere in the Mid-North the heavy snow was reported on Wednesday night 23rd.

South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969009

Country News
[From our Country Correspondents.]
BLACK SPRINGS, July 28.
On Monday, at about half-past 7 o'clock, it commenced to snow heavily, and lasted for several hours. Some of the snow remained on the hilltops for several days. It was the heaviest fall of snow that has taken place for many years in this part. The weather is now fine, but very frosty.— Feed is scarce.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969009
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
Country News. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969009

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The Wallaroo Times and Mining Journal (Port Wallaroo, SA : 1865 - 1881) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/110353079

I suppose you have heard about the snow we had on the Dutchman. There was one part of the Flinders Range that looked most beautifullast week, from a heavy fall, and it lasted two days, and when the sun shone it was really splendid. Some of the residents of Quorn went out in their traps and visited the place, and others engaged in snow balling in the township, in the evening, so that shows well for the cold winters in the north of which we have heard so much remarked that it is a country that only gets rain about once or so in twelve months. The squatters cried it down well for a long time till they found out they could not manage to do so any longer.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110353079
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10405552
APA citation
QUORN. (1879, August 9). The Wallaroo Times and Mining Journal (Port Wallaroo, SA : 1865 - 1881), p. 2. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110353079

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 12 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128498670

FARRELL'S FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
August 6.
Since my last we have been visited with a good fall of snow, and for the first time snowballing was carried on here in the streets. The fall was heavy here but it must have been a great deal heavier further up the line, as trucks on the goods train from Hallett were partly covered with the white visitor. As a matter of course the weather was intensely cold with a sharp frost, and very little change has taken place in the atmosphere since.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128498670
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658404
APA citation
FARRELL'S FLAT. (1879, August 12). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128498670

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 21
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969034

LAUNCELOT, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
We experienced a heavy fall of snow on Wednesday night [Wed 23rd July - Miles], and on the following morning the ground was covered two inches in depth.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969034
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
LAUNCELOT, JULY 28. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969034

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 p 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969028

LAURA, July 29.
Next to the rops comes the weather, which has been extremely cold. We did not have a fall of snow in the township, but the tops of the hills only a few miles away were quite white with it. The sight of the snow on the Mannanarie hills, fully twenty miles distant, greatly pleased those who saw it, many never having, seen snow-covered hills before. Commercial gentlemen arriving from further north profess to have had strange experiences in the snow, the relation of which tested our credulity to the utmost. We are now having fine days, but the mornings and nights are still very cold.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969028
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
LAURA, JULY 29. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969028

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 5 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128500102

MOUNT BRYAN FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 31.
The weather has been much warmer during the last few days. Yesterday and today have been like spring. The warmth has improved the appearance of the wheat and grass, although they are very backward. There are still a few patches of snow on the Range, but it has shrunk a good deal during the past two days. It looks strange to see snow on the hills and feel the weather quite warm.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128500102
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658396
APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. (1879, August 5). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128500102

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43091115

{quoting only snow-relevant text and text relevant to the barque Kalahome}

During the night of July 23, an unusual quantity of snow fell in the hilly districts, extending from the coast to more than 200 miles inland. The barque Kalahome from Newcastle, N.S.W., with coal for the Rivoli Bay Railway, ran aground on Glen's Point near Penguin Island, July 24, but was got off July 27, after lightering seventy tons of cargo, and throwing seventy tons more overboard.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091115
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3997440
APA citation
ABSTRACT OF NEWS. (1879, August 9). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 6. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091115

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497918

APPILA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 25.
A public meeting was held at Appila-Yarrowie on July 23 to discuss the working of the present Land Act." ... "The meeting was a thoroughly representative one, notwithstanding the severity of the weather. It rained steadily during the evening, with a strong easterly wind, which was almost unbearably cold; but notwithstanding this drawback many persons came from a long distance, showing thereby the lively interest which was taken in the proceedings.
On Thursday morning a grand sight was visible from this place. The Mannanarie ranges were covered with snow, and it did not entirely disappear until this evening.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497918
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
APPILA. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497918

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562459
Tarcowie.— Our Tarcowie correspondent writing on the 24th inst. (but whose letter we did not receive until the 28 th), says:— " Last night we had a very heavy fell of snow lasting for several hours, the ranges were covered for miles, and in many places it was over a foot thick.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562459
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574065
APA citation
The The Kapunda Herald. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562459

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926
BLACK ROCK PLAIN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28. During the early part of last week the weather was extremely cold, which resulted on Wednesday night in a heavy fall of rain and snow. On Thursday morning the surrounding hills presented a grand spectacle in their white robes, strongly reminding a person of the old country.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
BLACK ROCK PLAIN. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926

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This article below would suggest that there wasn't a snow cover at Rivertown itself on the morning of Wednesday 23rd.

RIVERTON. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562454

RIVERTON
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28, 1879.
Things are as dull as ever here. Every one complains of the cold, and not without reason, as on Wednesday last [23rd - Miles] we had a fall of snow at Macaw Creek, about three miles south of Riverton.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562454
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574065
APA citation
RIVERTON. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562454

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497924

YACKA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28.
In common with other parts of the colony we have had a continuance of wet and cold weather, but the snow storms that visited different places in the North did not reach this township. I am told by old residents that they never experienced such cold weather before in Australia.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497924
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
YACKA. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497924

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 29 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497372
MOUNT BRYAN FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 24.

Since my last nothing worth mentioning has happened here. The principal topic is the bad roads and cold weather, and it has been so cold that the crops and grass do not appear to grow. Tuesday and Wednesday were very cold, with an east wind. I happened to be out late last night, and found it very dark and cold until it commenced to snow, when it appeared to become much lighter Looking to the east to see where the light came from I was nearly blinded with snow, and when I reached home my children said I was a " snow man." Next morning I had some trouble to open the door, as the snow reached from the top to the bottom of it, and I had quite enough to do for a time to shovel the barrier away. The hills have been covered all day with snow, and there is a good deal lying in heaps! It is the first time that I have seen it remain on the plains all day, although I have seen it stay on the ranges for a week. Unless we get more warm weather than we have had lately there will be plenty of snow on Mount Bryan Range for weeks to come, so if the Clare young men like to come up here I think they will find snow- balling a better game than football — at any rate it would be a greater novelty to them.
Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497372
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658388
APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. (1879, July 29). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497372

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Tuesday 29 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562435
The Weather and the Crops in the Areas.—Mr. James Shakes (of Messrs. Liston, Shakes, & Co.), who has recently returned from a trip to the North, has kindly furnished us with the following interesting particulors:—" ... On Wednesday at Quorn it rained from about half-past 10 in the morning to daylight next morning, and by the appearance of the country there must have been nearly an inch, and as it came from the south-east and east the plains would be sure to participate in the welcome downfall on Thursday morning. Whilst on the way by tram from Quorn to Port Augusta a pleasing sight presented itself. Mount Brown and the Mount Arden Ranges were beautifully capped with snow, causing at Port Augusta and the neighbourhood quite a sensation, the experience of the settlers in regard to colonial snow having been of a rather disagreeable nature, requiring to be washed off with water and occasionally down with sundry half-pints of XXX or other exhilarating beverage. On the road back and when on the range near Canowie, Mount Bryan and the Razorback presented a sight which to a colonial like myself will be long remembered, the whole being covered with snow several feet in thickness. The weather the whole distance from Kapunda to Quorn and Port Augusta was intensely cold."
Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562435
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574060
APA citation
The Kapunda Herald. (1879, July 29). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 2. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562435
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Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197576048



Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576048
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22356404
APA citation
THE WEATHER. (1879, July 25). Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880), p. 3. Retrieved Novemb

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#1348831 - 16/11/2015 03:55 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
In the first post, the article on James Butler aged 18 perishing outdoors in South Australian snowfall near Jamestown in 1879, is on the bottom of the post - I may have given a link to it which goes nowhere. It's also posted just below (arrow pointing down).

This text at the bottom of the above post didn't post - perhaps I exceeded the length limit.

THE WEATHER. (1879, July 25). Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880), p. 3. Retrieved November 14, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576048

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James Butler aged 18 perishes outdoors in South Australian snowfall near Jamestown in 1879.

Two companions survived albeit very drunk and apparently asleep when James Butler moved away from their horse-drawn conveyance and died. The subsequent inquest decided death had resulted from cold and exposure. Some questions will remain forever unanswered.

Here's an account of the incident and inquest findings as reported in a newspaper.
Source: Trove website.
South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881)
Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 10.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969123

"The Jamestown Review says : — "On Saturday morning, July 26, news was brought in that the dead body of a young man named James Butler, aged 18, had been found on the Yarcowie-road, about two miles from Jamestown. It appears that on Wednesday evening, July 23, the deceased started from Jamestown in company with John Butler and William Alford, and that deceased was quite sober, but that his two companions were almost helplessly drunk. When they left deceased was driving. Nothing more was known until Friday, when deceased's friends, becoming uneasy at his unexplained absence, proceeded to make enquiries, which elicited the fact that the missing man had not been seen by any of his friends. On Saturday morning a search party started, and found the body about 100 yards from the road in a paddock belonging to Mr. Mattey. Of the two companions of the deceased one, W. Alford, had returned to his farm up North, the other, John Butler, was present at the inquest, but declared himself unable to remember anything which had happened on Wednesday after 11 or 12 o'clock am. This witness stated that he awoke early on Thursday morning and found himself in the spring-cart nearly perished with cold and half covered with snow. Alford, who seems to have been tbe least drunk of the two, was standing near, but neither of them seems to have missed the deceased or to remember that they had started in his company. They found in the cart a waterproof overcoat, which they recognised as belonging to deceased, and in one of the pockets there was a bottle of rum with the seal unbroken. This was at about six miles from Jamestown. There was also an empty gin bottle at the back of the cart. Both the men, half frozen as they were, made their way home, and seem to have had a vague impression that deceased had come part of the way with them and started back again to Jamestown. From the position in which the body was found it seems probable that deceased left the cart intending to make to Mr. Mattey's residence, but was overcome with the cold. It will be remembered that the night of Wednesday was one of the most severe ever known in the North. The darkness and cold were intense, and heavy snow was falling. An inquest was held at the Globe Hotel on Sunday by Mr. J. Coombe, J.P. Evidence, of which the foregoing is a digest, was taken, and Dr. J. A. Cockburn deposed that the marks of struggling where the body was found were somewhat inconsistent with the assumption that deceased had died from cold, but that he could not pronounce positively as to the cause of death without a post-mortem. This having been directed, the inquest was adjourned to 7 p.m , at which hour the doctor resumed his evidence, and informed the Jury that he had found the vessels of the brain enormously congested, the stomach perfectly empty, and the rest of the organs in a normal condition. The appearances were such as might be expected when death had resulted from cold and exposure. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969123
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429427
APA citation
CORONERS' INQUESTS. (1879, August 9). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 10. Retrieved January 31, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969123 "

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Edited by Unstable (16/11/2015 04:05)
_________________________
Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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#1352689 - 13/12/2015 11:20 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1880 July 16th-17th: substantial snowfall Mid-North and Flinders Ranges, no reports found of snow in southern Lofties.

I've not been able to determine the causes of this snowfall either from the newspaper reports or from the Charles Todd folios covering the period of this event. The snow fell overnight June 16th and on the morning of 17th. Several locations reported hail showers and several locations reported strong winds without saying from which direction they blew.

This was not an exhaustive search of Trove and further searching may turn up reports of snow at locations not mentioned here.

I was unable to find any reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps there was some light snow on the highest ground during the night but nobody saw it and it had melted by dawn, or maybe it simply didn't fall there.

As mentioned above the reported snow fell overnight June 16th and on the morning of 17th and the addresses of the Todd folios for those two days are http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/18800716.html and http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/18800717.html (click on the images to proceed to the hi-resolution images in each case).

Below is a copy of a table from the Todd folio for 17th July 1880. It includes the wind direction at 9am reported at several South Australian locations. They include Streaky Bay south-westerly at 34 mph, Robe easterly at 8mph, Adelaide easterly at 8 mph, Kapunda variable at 13mph, and Port Augusta westerly at 13mph. These wind directions suggest to me that a complex weather situation may have prevailed over southern South Australia while snow was falling in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges. Perhaps in the future a detailed study of all sources might elucidate this further.

There's no actual weather map drawn on the Todd folio for either day, and the following day 18th was a Sunday where no weather information was provided in the folio. The address of the folio where this table appears ie Saturday 17th is http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1880/18800717t01_hi-res.jpg .



Overall the snowfall was not as widespread as the fall a year previously on the 23rd July 1879, but nevertheless it was still substantial for the Flinders Ranges and Mid-North and locally it may have been more substantial than the 1879 fall.

I was expecting to see some references to the 1879 snowfall only one year previously almost to the day, but only one article I saw mentions the 1879 fall and none compare this 1880 fall with the 1879 fall.

Now, here is a summary of what I found in a search of Trove relating to the event, so readers won't need to wade through many articles and their associated links. In a separate post below the summary is Appendix 1 which is a more detailed compilation of what I found, and you can safely ignore Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report.

Unless otherwise stated all text below from newspaper articles is quoted from Trove after being corrected. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted only the snow-relevant text from each published article.

Wirrabara, July 17.
Heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued until midday to-day. Over an inch of rain has fallen. Snow also fell during the night and this morning. The hilltops are still covered. The weather is bitterly cold, and rain still threatens.

Caltowie, July 17.
We have had splendid rains, which will give the crops a good start, and the weather is very cold. The ranges round Mount Lock and the Hogshead are covered with snow, and look beautifully white from the township.

Wilmington, July 17.
We have had about an inch of rain since yesterday, and a steady soaking rain is still falling. Mount Brown and the prominent peaks of the Flinders Range are capped with snow. It is very cold.

Mannanarie, July 17.
Yesterday we had a break in the weather, since which we have had good soaking rains lasting for eight hours. This morning we have had a small fall of snow.

Melrose, July 17.
Over an inch of rain fell since yesterday, and Mount Remarkable and the Flinders Range for many miles are covered with snow from the summit to the foot, and present a grand appearance. This is the heaviest fall of snow that has been experienced for the last twenty years.

Port Augusta, July 18.
The weather yesterday was intensely cold, and snow fell in the Flinders Range.

HALLETT, July 17. Snow commenced falling about 12 o'clock last night, and is now visible on the hills. There is no sign of the weather breaking up. It is now raining.

JAMESTOWN, July 17. The rain still continues, and the weather is very threatening. Snow fell this morning early. It is now to be seen on Mount Lock.

PORT PIRIE, July 17. Over an inch of rain has fallen, and it is still raining steadily. Snow is plainly visible on the Flinders Range.

MORCHARD (via Yarrowie), July 17. A very heavy snowstorm commenced here this morning at about 7 o'clock, and continued without intermission until 12 o'clock. In some places the snow is laying six inches in depth on the ground.

MELROSE, July 17. Mount Remarkable is covered with snow. We are enjoying a splendid rain, which was much needed.

BLINMAN, JuIy 16. On Saturday evening, at 7 o'clock, snow commenced to fall, and lasted for an hour. It covered the ground and roofs for fully half an inch. The younger members of the community enjoyed a really hearty unorganised game of snowballing.

YARROWIE, July 17. It snowed here from 6 a.m. to-day until 12 noon. The Pekina Plains and Tarcowie ranges and the eastern slope of the Flinders range are covered with snow. Travellers from Pekina and Tarcowie state that the trees and wire fences are hung with icicles, and that snow is lying deep between the ranges.

Snow on the Flinders Range. The more northerly slopes of the Flinders Range were partially covered with snow on the morning of Saturday, the 17th instant, about five miles north of Wirrabara, the country to a large extent being clothed with a complete white muffle. The residents of this locality (says the Anas Express) were out busy making large snowballs. As a novelty, those who had never before witnessed the earth so covered were enraptured with the beautiful purity of the scene. The snow was visible all the day on Mount Remarkable and the higher ridges of the range. The weather was so intensely cold with snow fallen taat a horse, being ridden by a man named Parkes, refused to proceed along the road midway between Yarrowie and Gladstone, and the cold had so affected the man that he was perfectly powerless, and unable to manage the animal. The horse finding himself master of the situation, at once made tracks homeward, where Parkes had to be lifted from the saddle, to the seat of which he thought himself frozen. He suffered so much from the cold that he had to be taken to bed.

"PORT PIRIE. [From our own Correspondents.] July 19, 1880.
On Thursday evening rain began to fall, and on Saturday we had a regular downpour. The weather was very cold, and the Flidder's Range, immediately behind Port Pirie, was snow-capped. The snow was discernible all day Saturday. Residents here declare that it is the first snow they have seen.

APPILA. [From our own Correspondent.] July 17.
It commenced to rain again this morning about the break of day, and continued until noon, when it cleared up. Altogether there was nearly an inch which is I believe the best we have had since April. During the time there was a fall of snow, which was very light here, but when the clouds cleared away the Mannanarie and Pekina hills were covered.

BLACK ROCK PLAIN. [From our own Correspondent.] July 20.
About half-past seven on Saturday morning snow began to fall on the ranges on both sides of the plain, and about noon they presented a grand spectacle being all covered with snow. Only a few flakes fell on the plain.

BOOLEROO, July 19.
Nice showers fell during Friday night, and on Satur- day morning splendid rain fell intermixed with snow. When the clouds cleared away the adjacent hills were seen to be covered with snow, and it was distinct.y visible lying in the ridges on Mount Remarkable to day.

TARCOWIE, July 19.
On Thursday last the much-needed fain fell, and cont nued until Friday evening. This was succeeded by a heavy fall of snow which lasted for upwards of six hours, and the youngsters of our township were jubilant in having a real game of snowballing. The surrounding hills presented a pretty and novel appearance, being quite white.

WILMINGTON, July 20.
We have had a fall of snow again this year in the ranges, and it is somewhat remarkable that it is within three days of the time of the same occurrence last year.

YATINA, July 19.
On Thursday afternoon, July 15, the much-required rain came. A good shower set in, and again on Friday night it rained heavily at times. On Saturday we experienced a heavy fall of snow, the surrounding hills being covered.

YARCOWIE (Pekina Extension), July 20.
... we are being favoured with the long-looked-for rain, which commenced on Friday afternoon last, and it has rained ever since. This morning the Pekina and the Flinders Ranges were covered with snow.

ORROROO, July 19.
Something so unusual for our young colonials was the fall of snow here on Thursday night that several buggies were driven to the hills close at the back of the town, and came back loaded, whereupon the boys indulged in a good game of snowballing.

BLINMAN, July 19.
Winter has set in with a vengeance. Yesterday Blinman was visited by over one inch of rain, which was preceded on the previous day by a fall of snow. Men and boys could not resist the temptation so seldom given them of snowballing each other.

WIRRABARA, July 20.
During the past week or so we have had some splendid rains: about an inch and a half fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had also a heavy fall of snow, the hills being covered nearly all day on Saturday. It was a spectacle to look upon with astonishment and delight by many who beheld it for the first time The weather is still very cold and very severe frosts have occurred since Sunday.

Farrell's Flat July 23.
Heavy showers of rain fell last night, and the greater part of to-day were accompanied by a strong wind. The weather is extremely cold, and snow is said to have fallen this morning in different parts of the district.

Wilmington, July 23. The weather is cold and wet and stormy.

Hallett, July 23. Rain, hail, and snow are falling in abundance. The air is piercingly cold.

Auburn, July 23. Heavy rains fell last night, accompanied with severe hail, and continued the whole of to-day with but few intervals. The weather is bitterly cold.

BLINMAN. [From our own Correspondent.] July 19, 1880.
Rain has made Its appearance in this wilderness again, one inch having fallen since
Friday evening ... On Saturday evening about 7 o'clock a shower of snow came on to the great delight of the young Australians, who for the first time beheld real snow. Several young men went up to the smelting works, got on the roof and swept the snow together, making one very large ball and several smaller one, these afterwards were turned to firing material. There was no snow at Beltana; the fall seems to have been in a direct line north, and not very wide. About quarter of an inch was the depth of snow here.

COOMOOROO, July 22.
... by the splendid rains and snow which fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had some very heavy showers on Friday evening, and were under the impression that it had been raining all through the night, and were astonished to find on Saturday morning that it had been snow instead of rain. The fall of snow was so heavy that all the hills were capped with it, some of the higher ones being completely covered. It continued raining and snowing at intervals nearly the whole of Saturday. Over three quarters of an inch of rain fell, which will greatly benefit the crops. Since the rain the nights have been intensely cold, and we have had some of the most severe frosts ever remembered here.

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Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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#1352690 - 13/12/2015 11:36 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
APPENDIX 1: DETAILS OF 1880 July 16th-17th SNOW REPORTS.

The preceding summary in the post above is quoted from these newspaper articles below. You can safely ignore everything in this Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report.

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Monday 19 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43145846

{Quoting the whole article to give a feel for the weather and the substantial rainfall recordings during July 16th and 17th.

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

Crystal Brook, July 17.
A heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued till evening. Then it ceased for several hours, and the clouds, which had been gathering in the interval, broke about 2 o'clock this morning with a steady rain, which still continues, and there is every appearance of a heavy downpour. This is the most welcome rain we have had this season, as the early-sown crops were beginning to assume a withered appearance

Wirrabara, July 17.
Heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued until midday to-day. Over an inch of rain has fallen. Snow also fell during the night and this morning. The hilltops are still covered. The weather is bitterly cold, and rain still threatens.

Caltowie, July 17.
We have had splendid rains, which will give the crops a good start, and the weather is very cold. The ranges round Mount Lock and the Hogshead are covered with snow, and look beautifully white from the township.

Mongolata, July 17.
Nice rain fell last night, and it is still raining, with every appearance of continuance.

Truro, July 16.
Heavy rain fell here this afternoon, and it is still raining. It will do good, as the ground was beginning to get dry, and will help the late-sown crops.

Mallala, July 17.
It was raining nearly all day yesterday, the rainfall registered at Mallala being 0400.

Wilmington, July 17.
We have had about an inch of rain since yesterday, and a steady soaking rain is still falling. Mount Brown and the prominent peaks of the Flinders Range are capped with snow. It is very cold.

Redhill, July 17.
We have at last had a glorious downpour of rain. An inch has been registered since yesterday. The rain still continues to fall.

Telowie, July 17.
A glorious rain has been falling since 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Nearly one inch has been registered. The prospects of the crop are splendid. It is expected that the creek will be running before the evening.

Mannanarie, July 17.
Yesterday we had a break in the weather, since which we have had good soaking rains lasting for eight hours. This morning we have had a small fall of snow.

Melrose, July 17.
Over an inch of rain fell since yesterday, and Mount Remarkable and the Flinders Range for many miles are covered with snow from the summit to the foot, and present a grand appearance. This is the heaviest fall of snow that has been experienced for the last twenty years.

Yarcowie, July 17.
A splendid rain set in last evening. The gauge registered 0 390 this morning. It is still raining.

Blinman, July 17.
Half an inch of rain fell here yesterday. It is still raining heavily.

Port Pirie, July 17.
There has been a very heavy fall of rain during the night, and it is still coming down steadily, with every appearance of continuing. It will do a vast amount of good.

Maitland, July 17.
Very heavy rains fell here last night and early his morning.

Quorn, July 17.
No rain having fallen since June 24 the country was beginning to look dry, and farmers were becoming very anxious. Yesterday a decided change occurred, and rain commenced in the afternoon, continuing pretty steadily till this afternoon. A good quantity has fallen, and it is still raining. There is every appearance of a continuance, except under the hills. The crops in the surrounding hundreds are backward, but are healthy, the constant heavy dews having sustained them. Feed is scarce, but in a week after these rains the country will be wonderfully altered.

Port Augusta, July 18.
Glorious rains commenced falling on Friday evening, and continued during the greater part of yesterday. The northern and eastern areas have participated in the downpour, and the agriculturists are reassured. The weather yesterday was intensely cold, and snow fell in the Flinders Range. To-day the weather is fine and warm.

Port Pirie, July 18.
We are having splendid rains, which have just come in time to save the crops, more especially the late sown. The farmers are in high spirits.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43145846
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009377
APA citation
THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS. (1880, July 19). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43145846

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Monday 19 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/30804264

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

COUNTRY TELEGRAMS.
[From our own Correspondents.]

HALLETT, July 17. Snow commenced falling about 12 o'clock last night, and is now visible on the hills. There is no sign of the weather breaking up. It is now raining.

JAMESTOWN, July 17. The rain still continues, and the weather is very threatening. Snow fell this morning early. It is now to be seen on Mount Lock.

PORT PIRIE, July 17. Over an inch of rain has fallen, and it is still raining steadily. Snow is plainly visible on the Flinders Range.

MORCHARD (via Yarrowie), July 17. A very heavy snowstorm commenced here this morning at about 7 o'clock, and continued without intermission until 12 o'clock. In some places the snow is laying six inches in depth on the ground. The farmers are all rejoicing.

MELROSE, July 17. Mount Remarkable is covered with snow. We are enjoying a splendid rain, which was much needed.

BLINMAN, JuIy 16. One inch of rain has fallen since Friday evening. The weather is now dry, cloudy, and cold. On Saturday evening, at 7 o'clock, snow commenced to fall, and lasted for an hour. It covered the ground and roofs for fully half an inch. The younger members of the community enjoyed a really hearty unorganised game of snowballing. Business is still dull.

YARROWIE, July 17. It snowed here from 6 a.m. to-day until 12 noon. The Pekina Plains and Tarcowie ranges and the eastern slope of the Flinders range are covered with snow. Travellers from Pekina and Tarcowie state that the trees and wire fences are hung with icicles, and that snow is lying deep between the ranges.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30804264
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2295368
APA citation
COUNTRY TELEGRAMS. (1880, July 19). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 5. Retrieved November 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30804264

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43153181

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

Snow on the Flinders Range.— The more northerly slopes of the Flinders Range were partially covered with snow on the morning of Saturday, the 17th instant, about five miles north of Wirrabara, the country to a large extent being clothed with a complete white muffle. The residents of this locality (says the Anas Express) were out busy making large snowballs. As a novelty, those who had never before witnessed the earth so covered were enraptured with the beautiful purity of the scene. The snow was visible all the day on Mount Remarkable and the higher ridges of the range. The weather was so intensely cold with snow fallen taat a horse, being ridden by a man named Parkes, refused to proceed along the road midway between Yarrowie and Gladstone, and the cold had so affected the man that he was perfectly powerless, and unable to manage the animal. The horse finding himself master of the situation, at once made tracks homeward, where Parkes had to be lifted from the saddle, to the seat of which he thought himself frozen. He suffered so much from the cold that he had to be taken to bed.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43153181
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009406
APA citation
THE EXPLORATION OF PALESTINE. (1880, July 23). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43153181

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106564758

"PORT PIRIE.
[From our own Correspondents.]
July 19, 1880.
The fine weather has at last broken up. The farmers are once more jubilant, although many declare that their crops are partially nipped. On Thursday evening rain began to fall, and on Saturday we had a regular downpour. The weather was very cold, and the Flidder's Range, immediately behind Port Pirie, was snow-capped. The snow was discernible all day Saturday. Residents here declare that it is the first snow they have seen.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564758
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574473
APA citation
PORT PIRIE. (1880, July 23). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564758

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97284140

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

APPILA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 17.
Since my last we have had a long continuance of dry weather, with occasional heavy frosts, which tended to retard the growth of the crops. Yesterday, however, we had a change for rain, and in the afternoon it came down pretty heavy, clearing up again at night. It commenced to rain again this morning about the break of day, and continued until noon, when it cleared up. Altogether there was nearly an inch which is I believe the best we have had since April. During the time there was a fall of snow, which was very light here, but when the clouds cleared away the Mannanarie and Pekina hills were covered.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284140
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658796
APA citation
APPILA. (1880, July 23). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284140

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97284142

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

BLACK ROCK PLAIN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 20.
On last Friday afternoon we were favored with a change of weather, a good shower of rain falling. We had a few light showers during the night until about 6 o'clock on Saturday morning, when it set in constant until noon. About half-past seven on Saturday morning snow began to fall on the ranges on both sides of the plain, and about noon they presented a grand spectacle being all covered with snow. Only a few flakes fell on the plain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284142
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658796
APA citation
BLACK ROCK PLAIN. (1880, July 23). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284142

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 24 July 1880 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160134803/18909612

{quoting only snow-relevant text and a reference to wallabies and an explosion}

COUNTRY NEWS.
COUNTRY LETTERS. [Correspondents are particularly requested to send their letters in time to reach us on Wednesday evening.]

"BOOLEROO, July 19.
... on Thursday a favourable change came on with light rains, and at noon on Friday the gauge showed 0.115 point'. Nice showers fell during Friday night, and on Satur- day morning splendid rain fell intermixed with snow. When the clouds cleared away the adjacent hills were seen to be covered with snow, and it was distinct.y visible lying in the ridges on Mount Remarkable to day.

TARCOWIE, July 19.
On Thursday last the much-needed fain fell, and cont nued until Friday evening. This was succeeded by a heavy fall of snow which lasted for upwards of six hours, and the youngsters of our township were jubilant in having a real game of snowballing. The surrounding hills presented a pretty and novel appearance, being quite white.

WILMINGTON, July 20.
We have had a fall of snow again this year in the ranges, and it is somewhat remarkable that it is within three days of the time of the same occurrence last year.

YATINA, July 19.
On Thursday afternoon, July 15, the much-required rain came. A good shower set in, and again on Friday night it rained heavily at times. On Saturday we experienced a heavy fall of snow, the surrounding hills being covered.

YARCOWIE (Pekina Extension), July 20.
... we are being favoured with the long-looked-for rain, which commenced on Friday afternoon last, and it has rained ever since. This morning the Pekina and the Flinders Ranges were covered with snow.

ORROROO, July 19.
Something so unusual for our young colonials was the fall of snow here on Thursday night that several buggies were driven to the hills close at the back of the town, and came back loaded, whereupon the boys indulged in a good game of snowballing.

ARNO BAY (Western District), July 15.
Wallabies are a source of great trouble and vexa tion to us, as we have to build high thick fences to protect our cropB from the devouring legions which favour us with their noctural visits.

BLINMAN, July 19.
Winter has set in with a vengeance. Yesterday Blinman was visited by over one inch of rain, which was preceded on the previous day by a fall of snow. Men and boys could not resist the temptation so seldom given them of snowballing each other.

PENOLA, July 19
The excitement consequent on the gunpowder accident which happened on Sunday night has some what cooled down, as there is every hope that the eyes of none of the men are seriously injured. They are terribly burnt about the face and neck, and will probably be disfigured from the effects of the powder for life. The escape from sudden death of the two men that were blown up appears to be miraculous, for if the powder had been loose Instead of in tins nothing could possibly have saved them.

WIRRABARA, July 20.
During the past week or so we have had some splendid rains: about an inch and a half fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had also a heavy fall of snow, the hills being covered nearly all day on Saturday. It was a spectacle to look upon with astonishment and delight by many who beheld it for the first time The weather is still very cold and very severe frosts have occurred since Sunday.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160134803
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18909612
APA citation
COUNTRY NEWS. COUNTRY LETTERS. (1880, July 24). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 11. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160134803

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Saturday 24 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43148427

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.
Farrell's Flat July 23.
Heavy showers of rain fell last night, and the greater part of to-day were accompanied by a strong wind. The weather is extremely cold, and snow is said to have fallen this morning in different parts of the district.

Wilmington, July 23. The weather is cold and wet and stormy.
Hallett, July 23. Rain, hail, and snow are falling in abundance. The air is piercingly cold.
Auburn, July 23. Heavy rains fell last night, accompanied with severe hail, and continued the whole of to-day with but few intervals. The weather is bitterly cold.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43148427
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009032
APA citation
THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS. (1880, July 24). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43148427

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Tuesday 27 July 1880 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106564799

"BLINMAN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 19, 1880.
Rain has made Its appearance in this wilderness again, one inch having fallen since
Friday evening ... On Saturday evening about 7 o'clock a shower of snow came on to the great delight of the young Australians, who for the first time beheld real snow. Several young men went up to the smelting works, got on the roof and swept the snow together, making one very large ball and several smaller one, these afterwards were turned to firing material. There was no snow at Beltana; the fall seems to have been in a direct line north, and not very wide. About quarter of an inch was the depth of snow here."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564799
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574477
APA citation
BLINMAN. (1880, July 27). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved November 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564799

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 31 July 1880 Page 12.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160135029

"COOMOOROO, July 22.
The farmers were complaining bitterly of the prospect, and fears were entertained that next season's yield would be a very poor one. But all doubts and fears were set at rest, at least for a time, by the splendid rains and snow which fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had some very heavy showers on Friday evening, and were under the impression that it had been raining all through the night, and were astonished to find on Saturday morning that it had been snow instead of rain. The fall of snow was so heavy that all the hills were capped with it, some of the higher ones being completely covered. It continued raining and snowing at intervals nearly the whole of Saturday. Over three quarters of an inch of rain fell, which will greatly benefit the crops. Since the rain the nights have been intensely cold, and we have had some of the most severe frosts ever remembered here.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160135029
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18909653
APA citation
COUNTRY NEWS. COUNTRY LETTERS. (1880, July 31). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 12. Retrieved November 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160135029

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Edited by Unstable (13/12/2015 11:45)
Edit Reason: format changes
_________________________
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Email: weather at internode.on.net

Top
#1357918 - 10/01/2016 01:24 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (second instalment).

On 29th August 1905 there were very extensive snowfalls over the high country, from the Mount Lofty Ranges to the Flinders Ranges. My impression from reading newspaper articles of the time is that this was probably one of the ten biggest snow events in South Australia's recorded history, and it follows rather closely on another of our biggest snow events, on 27th and 28th July 1901. I may in the fullness of time attempt a comparison of the 1901 and 1905 events, because it could be that these two events are the two biggest snowfalls in South Australia's recorded history.

I posted a newspaper article from Trove earlier in this thread with reports from some towns where it snowed, namely the article:
The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824751
It's currently on page 17 of this thread here http://forum.weatherzone.com.au/ubbthreads.php/topics/1190645/17 and it's also on the South Australian Snows website currently here http://sasnows.com/1905/1905August29snow.html

Below I've posted another and much longer article I found and corrected on Trove, devoted entirely to reports sent in from many towns where it snowed (and from a train passenger), from Meadows South in the south to Orroroo in the north.

Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Saturday 2 September 1905 Page 44.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/162438735

{quoting entire article}

SNOWBALLS AT A DANCE.

ROBERTSTOWN, August 29.—This morning the hills to the west and north present quite a picturesque sight. They are heavily covered with snow. A slight fall occurred in the township at 7.30 last night. At a dance held at Point Pass last night the people had the novelty of snow- balls in the dance room.

AUBURN, August 29.—To-day has been intensely cold. Between 9 and 10 o'clock there were several light falls of snow, which, however, melted as soon as the ground was reached. The fall was heavier in the hills, about four miles to the north. These were covered, and when the clouds lifted for a short time and the sun shone the scene was one of rare beauty. Heavy hailstorms have passed over at intervals.

ANGASTON, August 29.—The weather here has been extremely wintry during the past 24 hours, with driving showers of rain, hail, and sleet. Early this morning there was a fairly heavy fall of snow, which completely covered the ground. It lasted only a short time in the township and on the flats, but the hills were covered to a fairly late hour with a thick white mantle. At time of writing snow is falling.

BRINKWORTH, August 29.—There was a fall of snow here at the time the train for Adelaide was leaving. It lasted about 10 minutes. There is every appearance of more good rain.

BRINKWORTH, August 29.—Several falls of snow have occurred, one during the night, one at 8.45 a.m., and another with hail at 9.45 a.m. The hills on Bungaree were white this morning at daylight, and remained so until 10 a.m.

BURRA, August 29.—A snowstorm was experienced at Burra to-day, and the fall at intervals was heavy. The country looked magnificent, especially when the sun came out. Residents, both young and old, were busy the greater part of the day snowballing. Nearly all the children able to make a snowball forgot all about school, and the attendance suffered in consequence. Although some folks got severe knocks, the fun was all taken in good part.

CLARENDON, August 29.—The residents of Clarendon for the first-time for many years were to-day treated to a sight of a snowfall. The cold was intense, and before noon there was a fall of heavy sleet. The flakes were abnormally large, almost massive, which showed that the cold was confined to the lower portions of the atmosphere. A few miles out of the township the fall was sufficiently heavy to whiten the ground.

CALTOWIE, August 29, 10.50 a.m.— We had one of the most beautiful sights ever witnessed here early this morning. At 6.30 snow began to fall, and in a few minutes the whole district was white, while trees, shrubs, plants, were mantled with flake. By 8 o'clock the ground was covered inches deep. Snowdrift in corners was a foot thick. It is still snowing at intervals.

CLARE, August 29, 11.36 a.m.—A heavy fall of snow occurred this morning. The whole country is completely covered.

CRYSTAL BROOK, August 29.—The weather is very cold, accompanied by high wind and driving sleet. Good rain has fallen through the district. This will benefit the crops and grass immensely.

DAVEYSTON, August 29.—We have had heavy rain, which was badly needed. A feature of this change has been the snow on the ranges, showing clearly in the sunlight after 9 o'clock this morning.

FARRELL'S FLAT, August 29.—Great surprise awaited early risers this morning, as the ground was thickly covered with snow. The snow continued at short intervals until nearly noon.

GEORGETOWN, August 29.—The district presents a phenomenal sight, the majority of the residents witnessing for the first time falling snow. Shortly after midnight a heavy hailstorm occurred, covering the ground for inches deep with hail. Since then snow has been falling periodically. Bundaleer hills are white with snow in places 4 ft. deep. Mr. Andrew Inglis, farmer, reports snow 3 to 4 in. deep all over his garden. Sixty-one points of rain has been registered.

GUMERACHA, August 29.—A considerable quantity of snow has fallen to-day. About 2 a.m. there was a fairly heavy fall, and from 11 a.m. till 1 p.m. there was an almost continuous snowstorm. Prior to that a great deal of hail fell. This afternoon we have had light hailstorms. The thermometer at about 3.30 p.m. registered 42 deg. Fahr.

GRUNTHAL, August 29.—During the last two days heavy rains have been experienced. Last night showers of hail fell. The Onkaparinga River came down a banker this morning. Snow fell between 10 and 11 o'clock for half an hour. The spectacle was one of the finest witnessed in this locality.

HOUGHTON, August 29.—For an hour this morning we had a fall of snow. Elderly residents talked of the old country, while the youngsters were busy snow- balling.

JAMESTOWN, August 23.—A magnificent sight greeted the residents this morning, when a heavy fall of snow was witnessed. It commenced about 6 o'clock, and in a short time the whole of the surrounding hills, valleys, and plains were covered with a beautiful white mantle. The sight, looking at the Bundaleer Forest and surrounding hills, was truly picturesque, and had the appearance of an Alpine scene. In the town the fall was heavy. The trees, especially the pines, in the various avenues and plantations, presented a pretty effect, the foliage being powdered with feathery flakes of snow. Snowballing was indulged in in every direction. At one place near the plantation along the creek the snow was so thick that immense snowballs, about 2 ft. to 3 ft. through, were piled one on top of the other, until a pyramid about 10 ft, high was made. In other places one would see residents, old and young, rolling immense snowballs on the grass that was covered with snow, until they attained a diameter of 4 to 5 ft. Photographers, both professional and amateur, eagerly took views of the beautiful scenes. As the snow ceased and occasional glimpses of the sun came out the sight was one that will long linger in the memories of those who were privileged to witness it. The snow fell at intervals during the whole of the day. At times it was heavy, and in the afternoon snow was lying thick on the hills and plains. It is confidently asserted that the fall here to-day is the heaviest ever experienced in this State.

KYBUNGA, August 29.—A few flakes of snow fell this morning, but hardly enough to cover the ground.

LOBETHAL, August 29.—The barometer took a sudden fall again last night, with the result that heavy rain fell in the night, and afterwards snow. This morning a white mantle covered the landscape. During the day there have been several falls of snow.

LYNDOCH, August 29.—Residents awoke from their slumbers this morning to behold a pretty sight. The Barossa Range from Williamstown across Pewsey Vale and Kayserstool was snowclad, and presented a lovely picture. A slight fall was noticed in the township. At midday snow could still be seen on the range.

MANOORA, August 29.—We have had a heavy fall of snow in the hills. All the trees are mantled this morning. It is still snowing (9.50 a.m.), but the wind is too strong for its accumulation. This is the heaviest fall since 1901.

MOUNT BRYAN, August 29.—For about four hours this morning residents were favoured with a beautiful fall of snow, which covered the ground to the extent of about 2 in., and presented a pretty sight. The hills are mantled with white, and all that is required to make a typical English scene is a robin redbreast. The residents engaged in snowballing and making snow men.

MONGOLATA, August 29. — Heavy showers fell during the night, and this morning snow fell for some time. This will do a lot of good to feed, which, although plentiful, was fast dying off. The lambing has turned out well, and stock are in splendid condition.

MYLOR, August 29.—A beautiful snow- storm was experienced this morning. It started at 9 and kept on until 1 o'clock. At times the snow fell so thickly, that one could not see above a chain ahead. Mr. McCaffrey took the school children out, and they stood in the storm with their slates above their heads catching it, after which snowballing was engaged in. It was the most beautiful sight ever witnessed here, coming as it did in the day-time, and everything being covered in a mantle of white. The hills in the distance looked exceptionally pretty with their tops gleaming when the sun shone.

MEADOWS SOUTH, August 29.—It has been cold to-day, and the glass registered down to 35 deg. This morning there was a heavy fall of snow.

MOUNT BARKER, August 29, 1.5 p.m. —Snow has fallen here several times this morning. A heavy storm occurred at about 11 o'clock. The weather is intensely cold and wet.

MARRABEL, August 29.—A heavy fall of snow occurred early this morning. It was about 4 in. deep in the paddocks, and snowballing was the order of the day. Snowballs of all sizes are to be seen everywhere, while a big snow man is on guard in the main street, dressed up with a new suit and a pumpkin hat. This has caused much fun and excitement, especially among the school children. A fall of snow about four years ago was heavier than the present fall. This will do more good to the crops than all the rain, as it will all soak into the ground.

NURIOOTPA, August 29.—The weather is intensely cold, with snow, hail, rain, and strong wind. A fall of snow was experienced this morning between 4 and 5 o'clock. The snowclad hills were a picturesque sight until well on toward midday. Snow hung on the fences on the low lands long after sunrise.

OAKBANK, August 29.—To-day has been one of the coldest experienced for some time. Those who rose early and look- ed towards the ranges were rewarded with a fine sight, as all the hilltops were covered with glistening snow. Between Oakbank and Forest Range the fall seemed to be heaviest. Several times during the morning a few falling flakes were noticed, and about 11 o'clock there was a snowstorm. The flakes were thick and large, and the fall lasted for half an hour.

ORROROO, August 29.—The weather today has been intensely cold and showery. At 1 o'clock a heavy fall of snow occurred. It was a beautiful sight. The young people engaged in snowballing. The Pekina and Blackrock hills were covered in white. The light fall of rain will wonderfully revive the crops.

PETERSBURG, August 29.—About 6 o'clock this morning snow began to fall, and continued till about 8.30. The flakes, although small, fell thickly, and the ground, trees and buildings were soon covered with the beautiful crystals. The snow lay about three-quarters of an inch thick in level places, while on ledges and drifts it accumulated to the extent of 3 or 4 in. Snowballing was soon the order of the day, and was not confined to the juveniles. A westerly wind sprang up, and soon thawed the first fall. About 10 o'clock a second fall began with flakes thicker than before. It continued for about an hour, but except in secluded spots, the snow melted as it touched the ground.

SNOWTOWN, August 29.—Rough weather was experienced last night, and a rare sight was witnessed this morning in the form of snow in the Barunga Range. There was a light deposit on one of the highest points, while in the Clare Ranges there appeared to be a considerable fall.

RIVERTON, August 29.—Following on a good farmers' rain yesterday and last night, a fall of snow occurred during the early morning. Peter's Hill and the range beyond presented a pretty sight when the sun rose, showing the pure white mantle. About 7 o'dock this morning a slight fall was experienced in the township.

ROSEWORTHY, August 29.—Snow was seen falling at an early hour this morning. We had a novel experience on the arrival of the 7.40 train from Kapunda. The tops of the carriages were sprinkled with flakes of snow. The Barossa Ranges covered with snow presented a picturesque sight. There was much excitement among the school children, most of whom had never seen snow.

SOUTH ROAD, August 29.—The range at the back of Shepherd's Hill has been covered with snow to-day, a sight seldom seen in that locality, and it has attracted much attention.

TRURO, August 29.—A rare sight was witnessed here early this morning, when snow fell. Mount Rufus and other high peaks were covered with a mantle of pure white, that glistened and threw back the rays of the rising sun. Again at 1.45 snow fell. Children indulged in snowballing. The weather is bitterly cold, with a blustering wind.

TEROWIE August 29, 10 a.m.—Snow has been falling with short intervals for several hours. Everything is enveloped in a beautiful mantle of white. Cameras are in evidence, and amateur photographers are running around begging, borrowing, or stealing plates. The hills to the east look lovely when the sun peeps out every now and again. Appearances point to a continuation of the fall.

TARLEE, August 29.—Last night a cold change from the south came up, with rain, hail, and snow. At 7 o'clock this morning there was a slight fall on the hills, and again at 11 the hills were covered with a white mantle.

TANUNDA. August 29.—The hills surrounding the eastern side of the township were covered with snow this morning. The sight was beautiful and exhilarating. The old inhabitants discussed the phenomenon with great interest. The previous fall, on July 28, 1901, was much heavier than the present one, which extended well south along the course of the Barossa Ranges. The snow was seen until late in the evening. Mr. Sauer, a carrier from Angaston, reported that he had never experienced such a fall before. His horses, van, and the driver were literally covered with snow-flakes.

URAIDLA, August 29.—This morning the hills presented quite a picturesque appearance. The ground was covered with snow.

WHITE HUT, August 29.—The sight which met the eyes of the residents early this morning was one which for beauty could hardly be surpassed the world over. Snow was on the hillsides, the trees, sheds, posts, on the window ledges, and every- where in fact where it was possible for it to find lodgment. There has been snow here before, but never at this season of the year when the green of the trees and fields contrasts so beautifully with the white mantle. Two English ladies who have been out here for 14 years and have not seen snow since they left the old country were overcome by the sight. They said that they had never seen larger flakes even in England, nor had they ever witnessed a more severe snowstorms The heaviest fall took place at about 8 o'clock, when it was impossible to distinguish any object a short distance away. At about 7 o'clock this morning snowballing was in full swing. At one place where some English ladies were staying a snowballing contest took place, England v. Australia. As the Australians were all men it is needless to say which side was victorious, even though, as some of the Australians remarked, they had never had any practice before.

WATERVALE, August 20, 10.50 a.m.— Quite a heavy fall of snow has been experienced since about 4 a.m. The hills are well covered, and present a beautiful sight.

WIRRABARA, August 29.—After an intensely cold morning and sleety showers, a snow fall of a quarter of an hour's duration delighted residents at about noon today. Unfortunately the snow melted immediately on reaching the ground, but the sight was a lovely one. The temperature is down to 38 deg. Heavy gales blew last night, and there have been frequent hailstorms to-day.

WOODSIDE, August 29,—Extraordinary weather has been experienced during the past few days. Last night we had the rare combination of hail and thunder, while the wind blew half a gale. Although early this morning the sun shone brightly, the wintry conditions were resumed before 10 o'clock. After an hour of intense cold snow com- menced to fall, and continued for about 20 minutes. Although the flakes were large, they melted on touching the ground, but some of the higher hills, especially those around Charleston, were snowcapped.

YONGALA, August 29.—After a rough and stormy night the residents of Yongala awoke this morning to find their town and the surrounding country one glistening mass of white. Snow was falling, eddying, whirling in a blinding, glittering maze of wondrous flakes that quickly covered everything within view. Scarcely within the annals of the oldest residents has such a truly English snow scene presented itself to the delighted gaze of all beholders, as is witnessed here to-day. The hills to the south are a wonderfully beautiful spectacle, and everywhere, as far as the eye can reach, the country is garmented in pure spotless white. Snowballing is the order of the day, and merry groups of well-ammunitioned snowballers were early astir, making the air resound with their delighted shrieks of laughter as each well-directed shot struck home. Unsuspecting pedestrians and quiet elderly gentlemen out looking for views with their cameras, were lured into the fray, and the fun waxed fast and furious. It is a coincidence that on the same date last year the distant Mannanarie Ranges were coated in a similar manner. What a time the children had this morning!. Snow everywhere inches deep—in places feet deep—and not yet school time! What boy or girl either could resist having a shy ? From the age of five or six to, well say 50 for men—boys and girls of tender and mature growth alike revelled in the exhilarating pastime of snowballing, little caring to he reminded of the story of the boys and the frogs. But the opportunity was too good to be missed, and the rarity of such a snowstorm is sufficient excuse for any roughness the ' frogs" considered was used. The uplands of Yongala Estate and the distant Mannanarie Ranges present a charming sight just now, and to-day's snowstorm will remain long in the memory as constituting Yongala's record fall.

YACKA, August 29.—Snow fell about 9 o'clock this morning. It was plainly visible on the hills about six miles east from the township.

A travelling correspondent wrote on Tuesday:—"Call us early, hostler,' do!" was the cry last night at Petersburg. Yet when we were aroused at half-past 4 and the icy wind bit into our marrows we grizzled a lot, and were consoled with the advice that the "early bird catches the worm.” At 6.30 between Yongala and Belalie the sky darkened and the lookout ahead was gloomy. Soon there were cries from the junior passengers of "Look at the hail.” But, no! It was fine, driving snow, with a little rain, and as the train climbed slowly up the Belalie hills we entered a glorious snowstorm. We dared all railway rules, jumped out of the moving train to make snowballs, and snowballed the passengers as we moved along. At first the fall was fine and light, hut as we moved along everything was clothed in a beautiful white mantle, and the rough hills and valleys had never looked so lovely before. The horses and cattle stood with their backs turned to the wind, their manes and tails snowy white. One old draught galloped away across a wheat crop, and tried to keep himself warm. Close to Belalie we passed an unfortunate drover trying to get a small mob of white sheep to the Jamestown market. They would not face the keen wind. At Belalie all passengers turned out to snowball. So interested in the fun were the travellers that the train had a fair start before some decided to board again. As we ran into Jamestown the town presented a pretty sight. The wind had dropped, and the snow was falling straight down in large flakes. There was over an inch on the ground. Every one in Jamestown was snowballing, and business was almost at a standstill. One irri-table gentleman with an umbrella lost his temper. He soon had a pair of strong arms about him, and was rolled in the snow. The flakes are still falling steadily at 10 o'clock, and the snow is 2 or 3 in. thick everywhere.

Bagot, Shakes, & Lewis, Limited, received the following telegram from their Jamestown representative on Tuesday morning:—Heavy snow set in this morning at 6, followed by fine hail. It is now snowing heavily. Snowballing in street. Sale knocked out.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162438735
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19013171
APA citation
SNOWBALLS AT A DANCE. (1905, September 2). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 44. Retrieved January 8, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162438735

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#1358054 - 11/01/2016 03:17 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (continued).

There's an item in "The Advertiser" titled "THE WEATHER MAP" published Wednesday 30 August 1905, showing the weather map dated 29-8-05 (snow day). There's a reference to it being "this morning's map" but I can't see any more precise time of day given for the map. Maybe it was compiled from 9am data?

The item was published in The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 7. The link to the item on Trove is http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4955868

I've screen-grabbed the item from the Todd Folios into 6 images and posted them below. The address of the item on the Todd Folios is http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1905/19050829t02_hi-res.jpg





Bottom three images in next post.
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#1358055 - 11/01/2016 03:21 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
(continued from above post)





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#1358210 - 11/01/2016 20:18 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Skysthelimit Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 08/11/2008
Posts: 1131
Loc: Gladstone Sth Aust
lovely reading these snow reports during this hot spell Unstable. I'd love to see some of these falls repeated sometime ..........

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#1360535 - 26/01/2016 04:06 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (adding more newspaper items from Trove).

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326978

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Mount Bryan.
Sept. 4. {Monday 4th - Miles}
The weather has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week. We have actually had fine weather, hail, snow and to end up with dust on Friday night last, and
began with heavy frost in the morning. Truly, a bad start from a meteorogical point of view for September. On Tuesday morning last {29th August - Miles}, when people arose, much to their astonishment, the whole district was one vast sheet of white, and was a handsome sight to behold, and one never to be forgotten—even with little ones, who indulged in snow-balling. On account of the snow not thawing it was extremely cold, and life was a chilly one. It snowed incessantly all day, and snow flakes were pretty. Some of the residents of Mt. Bryan ascended the Mount and enjoyed themselves immensely, and the climb instead of rocks was one of snow, snow-balling and building snow men and women was carried on. Mr W Quinn, of Mount Bryan East, states never has he seen snow thicker than was the case on Tuesday last. Snow still lies on Mount Bryan, and in places is 6ft to 7ft deep."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326978
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Mount Bryan. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326978

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326997/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"World's End.
Sept. 1.
We have had a splendid fall of rain and snow since my last letter, and quite a pleasing change has overcome this neighbourhood. The sight of the snow was really grand, and to the colonials proved a source of great enjoyment."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326997
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
VOICES FROM THE PEOPLE. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326997

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326996/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Black Springs.
Sept. 1.
The only thing to report this week is the fall of snow, which happened on August 29 . The night previous was not extra cold, and it may be safely said that not one resident expec- ted snow to fall, especially so late in the year."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326996
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Black Springs. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326996

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327002/4756219

{quoting the whole item}

"Gums,
Aug. 29.
Heavy showers fell through the night and also to-day, accompanied by a strong wind ; 15 points of rain were registered. This morning early when glancing westward a beautiful
sight met the eye. The Burra ranges were clad in what appeared to be a heavy raiment of snow. Up till midday they were still white from summit to base, and even at the late hour of writing (3 p.m.) the higher peaks show out white when the sun touches them. We are anxiously awaiting particulars. Shearing commenced yesterday with a full team of men, but after shearing 300 sheep operations had to be suspended for a day or so owing to the inclement weather."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327002
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Gums. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327002

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327001/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Hallett.
Sept. 2.
By some of the residents it was prophesied that snow would fall during August, but their predictions were not seriously considered, and when least expected snow fell, and clad the whole surrounding neighbourhood in a mantle of white. The fall was particularly heavy on the Mount, and there is yet plenty of snow to be seen. Not being satisfied with Tuesday's fall a number of residents visited the Mount on Sunday {3rd September - Miles}, and it is said that snow will remain there for at least another fortnight."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327001
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Hallett. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327001

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327000/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Mt. Bryan East.
September 4 1905.
The school picnic, which was to have been held on Wednesday last {?? correspondent probably meant Tuesday 29th not Wednesday 30th - Miles}, had to be postponed, owing to the very inclement weather. We had a fair share of the snow which fell so abundantly on that day, and although five days have elapsed since then the summit of the Mount is still covered."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327000
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Mt. Bryan East. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327000

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326999/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Booborowie.
Sept. 2. {Saturday - Miles}
We have to record a fall of snow in this part. The residents forgot all else and indulged in snowballing on Tuesday {29th August - Miles}. The fall was not so heavy as on the last occasion, but the storm was much heavier while it lasted. The surrounding country was a most beautiful sight, and one that will long he remembered. At time of writing snow can be seen in some of the gullies of the surrounding country."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326999
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Booborowie. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326999

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326994/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Bundey.
Aug. 29.
Rain, hail and snow. From sadness and sorrow to joy and jollity. Such was the case to-day. This morning the top of the Californian Ranges wore a beautiful white coat of snow. Smart showers fell at intervals during the day, accompanied by hail and very heavy wind with a few scattered flakes of snow."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326994
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Bundey. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326994

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326993/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Collinsville.
Sept 4.
The weather during the past week has been extraordinary—wind, dust, gravel, hail, rain, and, last but not least, snow, which was very interesting to we settlers. Kelchowla hills and Pandappa ranges was a sight well worth looking at, and the oldest residents have never before experienced such heavy fall, and so far as known stands as a record ; 47 points of rain fell, consequently a more favourable aspect has resulted, but the chill never even killed the caterpillar, showing again the proverb, “ What is no good never comes to any harm.” "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326993
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Collinsville. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326993

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326980/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Whyte Yarcowie.
Sept. 4.
Many are the blessings cast upon this part of the earth in the form of watery particles congealed into while or transparent crystals or flakes in the air and falling to the earth exhibiting a great variety of beautiful forms commonly called snow. Starting about five o'clock in the morning on Tuesday last like a continuous swarm of insects near a stagnant creek the cold, biting and yet exhilarating air began to cast its unblemished, unstained, spotless flakes over mother earth, making the surrounding hills snow-capped, the trees snow-clad, and every one, that had the pleasure of being out in it were gifted with a white mantle and a snow crown. As the morning wore on the fall became heavier, and by daylight one would believe they had been suddenly conveyed into some unknown region of bliss, and by the time the Broken Hill express arrived here the picture was one never to be forgotten, and the passengers were rather inclined to spend the day here. The Port Adelaide football team, returning from Broken Hill, had a few decent snowballs deposited amongst them. Had Chancer been alive, and had witnessed the scene he would have quoted “ The field of snow with the eagle of black therein,” or “ So shows the snowy dove trooping with the crows,” the contrast being so great with the usual appearance of this district. Everyone, young and old, were soon out in the midst of it, the old folks returning to the day of youth, the younger generations, with the blood of their ancestors tingling in their veins, soon put forth their combative powers of snow-balling , this was carried on with the greatest of harmony, the crys of the young in their delight rising the thoughts of their youth and joy in the older generations. No one was spared, colour or country made no difference, had their been any coloured human being present the black would have been turned to white. A timid person on the sight of a snowball travelling in the direction of his brain-box could well quote the Shakespearian writing “ A faint, cold fear runs through my veins that almost freezes up the heart of life,” and by the time he had thus quoted, the collision with the missile of snowy flakes would be over. Work was cast aside, breakfast was not thought of, the guid wife forsook for once her better half, and joined in the exhilarating fight ; sallow cheeks were disposed of the blood of youth showing forth like rosy apples on a tree on the cheeks of all. The photographer was soon at work, snatching scenes which so rarely are presented, and some splendid views were taken ; snow balls were rolled up till it was beyond the power of humanity to move them ; snow men were made, one being placed on a pedestal at the railway station for the interest of the public, comfortably smoking a pipe and embracing two empty whisky bottles : it was here that a grand representative gathering took place before the camera and the job was done with one glass to the surprise of the photographer. It continued to blow cold during the day with blasts of hail, rain and snow. This timely fall of watery mixture will prove a boom to the farmers, and all others dependnig on Nature for their livelihood, and the crops and grass, which were beginning to weary for the want of moisture should once more go on their way rejoicing."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326980
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Whyte Yarcowie. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326980

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326982/4756219

{"The locality of Stanley Flat is situated in South Australia in the Mid North region, approximately 6 km north of Clare along the Main North Road. It is where the Clare Racecourse is situated, as well as an institute hall and a number of winery cellar door outlets." Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Flat,_South_Australia - Miles}

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"STANLEY FLAT LETTER.

August 29 {Tuesday - Miles}
We have been treated to all sorts of weather lately. Rain, hail wind and snow. Two or three days of last week was positively hot. but a high wind rose an Monday, when rain set in, and on Tuesday morn it was plainly visible a heavy snow storm had fallen during the night, and had thawed somewhat before morn, but still heavy drifts of it were up against houses, fences, straw-stacks, trees, etc. All day Tuesday it snowel, rained and hailed alternately ; sometimes the snow storms were so dense you could not see 200 yards before you. All the imported articles of this part must have been reminded of the old country. Snowballing we not indulged in, for, with the glass at 30, we felt like creeping near to a big log fire, more congenial. It rained all last night again and to-day ; we seem plunged into the depths of winter. A good deal of spraying for codlin moth, black scale, etc., had just been done in the orchards which have been work and expense in vain, as the rain has washed the liquid from the trees. During the high gale of yesterday a new iron tank at the school was blown over with such force as to cut several holes in it. To-day all the creeks, washaways and gullies are running bankers."

{Now the article moves to describing a school picnic on Friday September 1st with no mention of snow falling - Miles}
September 2.
Yesterday {Friday September 1st - Miles} we had our annual 8 hours' day picnic on the Bungaree estate, kindly lent by Messrs. Hawker, but a more disagreeable day could not be imagined. Almost Vt gale blew all day from N.W., and only t. 4 a break wind was made by cutting down a lot of branches and piling them against ees, our provisions, laid out on table cloths, woWld have been blown away, but despite all, Ibout a dozen trap loads of school children and adults turned up, and things were made rather lively by scrambles of oranges, almonds and 'wjes, kindly provided by the tradesmen of Clare and the children seemed so engaged in the fun Bey forgot a gale was in force.

{Now the article moves to snow in Clare and it's not clear from the article on what day the snow in this paragraph fell but I think it most likely Tuesday August 29 - Miles}
The snow fell heavily in Clare, and sor heavy fights with snowballs were indulged in both woman and men were at it, and several windows were broken. Whilst one man was in the act of throwing at another the man bobbed his head aside and the ball went through a plate-glass window, and he had to pay 9s 6d damages, but all seemed satisfied, as they had some splendid fun they may not get the chance of for years."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326982
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
STANLEY FLAT LETTER. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326982

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Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Tuesday 29 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109483683

The article on Trove was corrected by "jeff.noble"

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"The Petersburg Times
AND NORTHERN ADVERTISER.
Tuesday, August 29, 1905."

"Snow commenced to fall in Petersburg at two o'clock this morning, and continued right on into the day. Advantage was of course taken by the young people—nor did the older stand quite aloof—to indulge in the time honored game of snowballing. Passengers along the street were suddenly saluted with avalanches of snow, and the effect in some cases made it appear that the missles had been rather tightly squeezed. The whole, however, was good humoredly taken, as was indeed the better course, since even our municipal representatives could not, when they appeared, claim exemption. Rain also fell, the registration for the month of August at the local postoffice up to nine o'clock this morning being 48 points. It is now three years since last snow fell here."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109483683
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10673718
APA citation
THE Petersburg times AND NORTHERN ADVERTISER. (1905, August 29). Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), p. 2. Retrieved January 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109483683

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824625

{quoting entire article}

"SPLENDID AGRICULTURAL RAINS.
The following telegrams were received by Messrs. James Bell & Co. from their country representatives on Tuesday:—Yongala.—Heavy falls of snow all day; better than inch of rain; prospects now good. Petersburg.— Heavy falls of snow: fair rain since early morning, equal to half an inch. Paskeville.—Rain registering inch yesterday till noon: still raining: little snow and hail; squally. Owen.—About 1 in. last night and to-day: prospects good: still threatening. Port Wakefield.—Splendid showers last night, and again this morning; prospects bright. Kapunda.—Three-quarters of an inch of rain: still raining: prospects good: snow in places. Ardrossan.—Splendid rains have fallen here. 0.57 up to now. Balaklava.—Had splendid rains last night and to-day, about 1 in. Georgetown.—Splendid rain, also heavy snow. 70 points; best prospects: still snow and rain. Wallaroo.— Splendid showers to-day: every appearance of them continuing: will greatly benefit crops. Snowtown.—Much-needed rains now falling; 57 points up to now.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824625
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421546
APA citation
SPLENDID AGRICULTURAL RAINS. (1905, August 30). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved January 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824625

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#1363901 - 04/02/2016 00:25 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (yet more newspaper items from Trove).

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824610/4421546

{quoting observations relevant to this snowfall from among forays into poetic text referring to snow more generally}

A WORLD OF WHITE.
RECORD FALL OF SNOW.

" ... what took place in many places in South Australia on Monday night and during Tuesday. In its mantle of white the landscape was changed in appearance from Australian to English. Snow fell in numerous localities, but in no place more heavily than on the Mount Lofty Ranges. Adelaideans will remember the big snowstorms in the hills on Sunday, July 28, 1901, and again on June 30 of last year, but the present fall is easily a record. Old residents of the ranges, who have been bred and born there, say that they remember nothing like the present visitation. The country was transformed into a wonderful world of white. “Pure us snow” is a common expression, but nobody can understand its significance till he has seen it lying on the ground so cold, so pure, so beautiful that even to touch it were a shame. Early on Tuesday morning citizens were complaining of the cold, and scanning the distance hills all capped with white.
The word was soon passed around that there was snow on the ranges, and if ocular demonstration was needed l rcels of the frozen article brought down by residents in the hills would supply it. People were naturally eager to see the snow falling, and numerous parties were quickly organized to visit the ranges.

—Up in the Mountains.—
A representative of The Register proceeded to the ranges in a De Dion motor car. ... At the Glen Osmond terminus a teamster had pulled up to give his horses a drink at the water trough. The trolly was loaded with wood, and the redgum logs were powdered with snow. ... At the Devil's Elbow it started to hail, and by the time the top of the rise was reached the hard little balls of frozen rain were hammering merrily on the occupants of the car.
—The Eagle-on-the- Hill.—
At the Eagle-on-the Hill the mantle of white was the feature of the landscape. The garden at the back of the well-known hostelry was hidden in snow. ... The eagle behind his iron bars looked mopey and sad. The noble bird would rather have been soaring in the great expanse of blue and looking down on the white world.
—Snowballing.—
As the car left the hotel the proprietor shouted out— “Look out for the snowballs.” ... At the junction of the roads there was an army of boys and girls, and they were simply fiendish in their desire to hit passing travellers. Their supply of snowballs was enormous and those who had to run the gauntlet fairly shook in their shoes. ...
—Falling Snow.—
As the summit road was ascended snow began to fall thick and fast. ... There was something in the cold and enchanting scene that seemed to purify one's body, mind, and soul. Even the charred trees were rendered beautiful by the snow that lay upon them. It was a perfect study in black and white.
—At the Mount.—
Words are weak to describe the wonderful scene which was beheld at the Mount. The ground was covered in snow, in some cases to the depth of a foot, the rooftops were hidden beneath a mantle of white, and the trees were powdered thick with flakes. Frozen masses of crystals bent down the branches of the pine trees, while the great acacia trees, a mass of golden bloom sprinkled with white, were dreams of loveliness. The hedges were surmounted by a sheet of snow, and yellow daffodils and purple lilac rose up laughingly from heir beds of white. ... "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824610
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421545
APA citation
A WORLD OF WHITE. (1905, August 30). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824610

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824790

{quoting entire article}

WEATHER PROSPECTS FOR THE HOLIDAY.

Mr. Griffiths remarked on Wednesday:— “The weather during yesterday continued very unsettled, cold, and stormy, and further snowfalls, hail, and rain occurred in the agricultural parts of the State. At Hallett, Terowie, and Jamestown it was snowing nearly all day yesterday, and at Melrose there was a continuous fall for four hours. Rain extended up as far as Hawker, but again the upper northern districts had only very light showers. Moderate to heavy rains were recorded in the central districts, and on the Mount Lofty Ranges, light to moderate showers being recorded elsewhere. In all 82 stations in the agricultural areas recorded over a quarter of an inch for the past 24 hours, the maximum registration being 63 points at Meadows and Uraidla. The storm centre, which yesterday's weather chart showed between Mount Gambier and the western coast of Tasmania, has moved through Bass Straits to the New South Wales coasts, and barometers in this State have risen very rapidly. As a consequence, we have much finer weather this morning, though it is still stormy on the south-east coast, and snow is still being recorded in a few places in the north. On the ranges in the eastern States it is now snowing heavily, and the weather is generally becoming cold, unsettled, and stormy in the neighbourhood of Cape Howe. During the next 24 hours further showers may be expected in this State. Barometers will continue to rise, and finer conditions develop. A high-pressure area is rapidly approaching us from the westward, and the probabilities are that we shall have fine weather for the holiday.”

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824790
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421554
APA citation
WEATHER PROSPECTS FOR THE HOLIDAY. (1905, August 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824790

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Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96961360

{quoting entire article}

"THE WEATHER.
Heavy Rain, Hail, Snow, and Squalls.
The weather for the past few days has been of exceptionally cold, rough, and wintry nature, establishing a record for hailstorms, which have taken place almost by tbe dozen in the hills and south district, Monday night and Tuesday having so rapid a succession of them that banks of hailstones lay piled up in many parts right through the day and night. In the hills squalls were of unusually severe nature, the wind at times rising to hurricane power, doing a good deal of damage in parts to fruit trees and gardens generally, and in one or two parts flood waters added to the damage done by washing away whole plots of vegetables and garden soil. Snow fell heavily on the Mt. Lofty, Flinders, and Willunga ranges, and also on the northern plains, and many places in the state which had never before been visited by snow had unique experiences, much to the delight of the inhabitants. The scene on the hills was very beautiful, but the high wind and the sleety rain which fell at frequent intervals made out of doors sightseeing rather too unpleasant for people to indulge in as much of it as they would have done under more favorable circumstances. The snowfall did not extend to Strathalbyn, but reached to within about four miles of the town, in the direction of Macclesfield."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96961360
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9488654
APA citation
THE WEATHER. (1905, August 31). Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96961360

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306653

{quoting entire article}

"A SNOW STORM.
Heavy Fall in the Hills.
The winter through which we have now nearly passed has been a particularly cold and wet one, the atmosphere frequently savoring of the Frigid rather than the Temperate Zone. Snow has fallen on several occasions in some of the Hills districts, but it was not until Tuesday of this week that “Winter's snowy pinions shook the white down in the air” in any great quantity. The scene at Mount Barker at 11 a.m., when the flakes came down in great density, was typical of that during the record fall on the last Saturday and Sunday in July of 1901, but the storm not being very long continued the landscape did
not on this occasion become snow capped, and, much to the disappointment of the expectant ones, snow-balling could not be very greatly indulged in. A similar storm occurred about 4 a.m., and “feathers” were noticed descending again soon after day break, from which time until evening snow, hail, and rain came down at frequent intervals. The fall in the Mount Lofty district was much heavier than here, and the landscape was transformed into a wide expanse of whiteness several inches deep and which was plainly visible in Adelaide and from elevated peaks here and elsewhere. Snowballing was heartily indulged in and effigies built by the small fry, who everywhere revelled in the novel experience and gave travellers on the road a particularly warm time of it. Snow also fell plentifully at Yongala and other places in the North, the storm there being the biggest on record."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306653
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
A SNOW STORM. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306653

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The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147134814

{only snow-relevant text quoted}

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1905. .....
"Intensely Cold Weather. — Tuesday was one of the coldest days ever experienced in Narracoorte, and that seemed to be the general experience throughout South Australia.
It felt as if it was at freezing point all day, there being a bitter cold wind from the south, and we had several sharp showers of hail. Monday night and early Tuesday morning there was a heavy fall of rain, which registered 45 points at the Narracoorte post-office gauge at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning. A gale blew throughout Tuesday night with occasional showers of rain. The storm was at its height between 12 and 2 o'clock on Wednesday morning, but we have not heard of any damage being done. The rainfall registered at the Narracoorte post-office on Wednesday morning was 12 points. Wednesday and yesterday were comparatively fine, but it was still very cold. Snow fell in various parts of the state. On Tuesday morning the residents of Adelaide found the Mount Lofty hills covered with snow, and it presented a magnificent and unique sight. The snow continued to fall at intervals throughout Tuesday, and waggons travelling in the hills were covered with it. The snow was inches deep in the hills and snow-balling was engaged in by the residents. It was the heaviest fall of snow known by the oldest residents, and in many places it was six inches deep. At Clare the country for miles around was covered with snow. At Jamestown, in the North, there was a heavy fall of snow, and people ceased business to indulge in the novel pastime of snow-balling. Snow fell at Watervale, Wirrabarra, Terowie, Petersburg, Riverton, and many other places in the North. At Petersburg it was 3 in. deep. The Barossa hills and the Flinders Range were covered with snow throughout Tuesday. The Broken Hill express was 35 minutes late in arriving at Hallett through the passengers getting out at every station where there was snow to engage in snow-balling. All the highlands throughout the North were bathed in white, and the unique scene was keenly enjoyed by the people. The people in the South-East had to be content on Tuesday with common-place showers of hail."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134814
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17474880
APA citation
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1905. (1905, September 1). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134814

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56849821

{quoting entire article}

"SNOW IN THE COUNTRY.
APPILA-YARROWIE. August 30.—Yesterday was undoubtedly the coldest for the year. Rain, hail, and snow fell unceasingly. The Bundaleer and Mannary Ranges were a magnificent sight covered with snow.
HAMMOND, August 29.—Snow fell at different parts of the district to-day. The Mounts Brown and Remarkable and Horseshoe Ranges presented a picturesque appearance clad with the white mantle of snow.
MOUNT COMPASS, August 31.—Snow fell at 10.30 a.m. yesterday, and continued for a few hours.
UROONDA. August 29.—A slight fall of snow was witnessed to-day.
WILMINGTON, August 30.—Yesterday afternoon snow fell over the Flinders Range, and this morning it was an extremely pretty to see the snow glistering in the sun from the top of Mount Brown to Mount Remarkable, a distance of 25 miles.
WHITE HUT, August 30.—Snow, hail, and rain continued to fall at intervals during the whole of yesterday. Once in the afternoon snow fell heavily. Almost all traces of the snow have disappeared, except in a few places, where it is still lying on the ground. Snow men still stand here and there, looming up in the dark like ghosts."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56849821
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4422592
APA citation
SNOW IN THE COUNTRY. (1905, September 1). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56849821

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306631

{quoting entire article"

"NAIRNE.
Tuesday opened cold and wet, and there were not wanting signs that snow was near at hand. At 10.45 a.m. the flakes began to fall in earnest, and the storm lasted for 20 minutes. The tops of Sloggett's and Kenning's hills were covered on the town side. The young people were not slow to scrape up the snow and pelt each other. Several lighter falls occurred during the day, but the rain and hail soon swept away all traces of the snow."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306631
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
NAIRNE. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306631

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306644

{quoting entire article}

"MOUNT PLEASANT.
Between 3 and 4 a.m. on Tuesday a heavy fall of snow and hail occurred at Mount Pleasant, and early risers were greeted with a novel sight, the ground being quite white. During the day several heavy falls of snow occurred, and the weather was bitterly cold."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306644
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
MOUNT PLEASANT. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306644

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108435712

{quoting snow-relevant text only from longer article}

{heading unreadable, may be "City Scratchings" - Miles}
"By Timoleon.
Cold ? The word fails to convey an adequate idea of the suffering of citizens during the last few days. Everybody is talking of taking a single ticket for some warmer clime. The Mount Lofty Ranges presented a beautiful sight on Tuesday morning. The ridges were tipped with "beautiful snow," and the hillsides were covered with a white instead of their
usual green mantle. City thoroughfares were swept with a blinding sleet and hail, and people ran for shelter, and huddled themselves in front of fires. It was a cold snap, and no mistake. A number of citizens hastened to the mountains by motor and cab to engage in the frolicsome pastime of snowballing, about which the majority of us only know just about as much as our fathers have told us. If this is the sort of weather that accompanies "My Lady Snow," then snowballing is not all that it is ''cracked up to be.""

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108435712
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10566687
APA citation
City Scratchings. (1905, September 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved May 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108435712

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Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97595781

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

PINKERTON PLAINS, August 29.
"... The weather has been dry for the last month but a change came up on Friday, when 34 points were registered To-day has been fearfully cold with heavy showers of hail, 1 inch 19 points being registered since Friday."

"LYNDOCH, August 29 Residents awoke from their slumbers this morning to behold a pretty sight The Barossa range from Williamstown across Pewsey Vale and Kaiserstool was scow clad, and presented a love y picture A slight fall was noticed in the township At midday snow could still be seen on the range "

"NURIOOTPA, August 29 The weather is intensely cold, with snow, hail, rain, and strong wind A fall of snow was experienced this morning between 4 and 5 o'clock. The snowclad hills were a picturesque sight until well on toward mid-day. Snow hung on the fences on the low lands long after sunrise."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97595781
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9602821
APA citation
PISKERTON PLAINS, August 29. (1905, September 1). Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 10, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97595781

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97380408

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

"Notes from Auburn.
[By our own Correspondent].
August 30."
" ... Snow.— A slight fall of snow occurred yesterday, but it was accompanied by intermit e it showers of rain, and therefore melted immediately it reached mother earth. There were also several showers of hail during the day ... ".

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380408
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9622419
APA citation
Notes from Auburn. (1905, September 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 7, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380408

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97380404

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

News Letters.

"MOUNT BRYAN, August 29.
A splendid fall of snow occurred this morning. It continued intermittently from daybreak until midday, the snow showers being of much longer duration than the intervals between. A little also fell this afternoon. Owing to the strong wind the snow has not lodged on trees to anything like the extent it did four years ago, consequently the scenic effect has not nearly equalled that of 1901. There was, however, more drift on this occasion."

"BRINKWORTH, ...
August 29. Three falls of snow occurred here, one early this morning, one at 9.45 a.m., and one at 10.45 a.m. The latter was preceded by a fall of light hail. The wind was from the south-west and bitterly cold, and at time of writing (noon) is still so. The Bungaree hills showed up white this morning until 10 o'clock."

"BLYTH, August 30. ... On Tuesday morning last those who were not out of their slumbers were suddenly aroused by those who were at the unusual sight of snow falling. There was hardly a big enough fall to indulge in snowballing, hut the scene by those who were lucky enough to see it will never be forgotton. There was another fall in the afternoon, but only a very small one."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380404
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9622419
APA citation
News Letters. (1905, September 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 6, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380404

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_________________________
Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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#1364456 - 06/02/2016 00:49 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (two more newspaper items from Trove).

Below are two more newspaper articles with snow-relevant reports to add to the long collection above. The collection now contains what I consider to be the very substantial majority of all newspaper articles on the Trove database containing snow-relevant text on the August 29th 1905 fall, but not all such articles. In terms of town correspondents reporting in to the papers from country towns, it's likely to be one of the most widely reported snow event in SA's recorded history.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824749

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

THE COUNTRY.
CHERRY GARDENS, August 29.—The extreme coldness of the past live days cul- minated this morning in the heaviest fall of snow ever experienced in Cherry Gar- dens. The oldest inhabitants admit that they can remember nothing to equal it. It began to snow at 10.40 a.m., and continued without intermission for 40 minutes. The surrounding country was soon decked in a mantle of white, and snowballing was in- dulged in. The snow-capped peaks of Mount Lofty were much admired this morning. We have gauged 1.74 of rain since Friday.
FOREST RANGE, August 29.—The last day or two has been bitterly cold. At day- break this morning the place was covered with snow, and snowballs were gathered. In some places the snow was an inch deep, but it melted away as daylight came. Falls of snow and hail continued all day.
QUORN, August 30.—The weather was intensely cold here yesterday. During the night snow fell all along the Flinders Range. The eastern slopes were covered in patches. The Bald Hills of Yarrah and Wyacca were completely covered.
STOCKWELL, August 29.—There was a heavy fall of snow here this morning at about 5.30. It was not long before the ground was fully covered. The hills in the district looked pretty, with their white mantle, and it was well past noon before the snow faded away.
WHYTE YARCOWIE, August 29.—The residents of this township were agreeably surprised this morning when, on rising, they were surrounded by a heavy fall of snow. The fall continued up until noon, and was a sight to be remembered by many people, especially those who have been used to hotter climates and have never seen snow except on distant hills. Snowballing was in full swing all the morning by both young and old.
YONGALA ESTATE, August 29.—A wonderful and unique spectacle has been witnessed by the residents to-day. They awoke to find a thick covering of snow over everything. It varied in depth from 2 in. up to about a foot, and the view strong- ly reminded one of an English winter scene. During the whole day snow has been fall- ing, and the residents and school children have been amusing themselves with snow balling. The ranges on both sides present a beautiful sight, especially when the sun breaks through the clouds and reveals a picture dazzlingly white. It is many years since such a heavy and continuous fall has been experienced.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824749
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421553
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved February 4, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824749

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Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 12.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/166964260

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

Country News.
PETERSBURG, August 28.
After a spell of frost and dry weather, which was playing havoc with the crops, the early risers were greeted this morning with a snow storm, which continued at intervals through the day. After each storm the landscape presented a wonderful appearance, everything being covered with a mantle of white; the effect at the railway yard was splendid, engines and trucks laden with coal being black, and the snow presenting such a contrast. The Mannanarie Hills in the distance also presented a fine sight; it seemed to be heavier over there. Every one seemed to relish snowballing, so much so that none stood on their dignity but all joined in the merry fight, and business was more or less suspended during the day. The snow has not all gone yet, and promises to continue through the night. It will do a great amount of good, as the country was beginning to look a sorry sight after the very drying winds of last week.

YONGALA, August 29.
A most unusual spectacle met the eye of all except very early risers this morning. About 6 a.m. a smart shower of hail fell. This was soon followed by a steady fall of snow, and for about three hours everything exposed was clothed in a mantle of snow. The sight was rare and beautiful. Stock felt very uncomfortable with a coat of snow on their backs, and vegetation all covered under foot; but the youth of the town had a good time snowballing, young ladies and girls being especially to the fore. Even age and honour did not save one from the well-directed shower of snowballs. It was quite amusing to see the old Town Clerk, the bank manager, postmaster, and policeman, trying to dodge their missiles.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166964260
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19591552
APA citation
Country Mews. (1905, September 1). Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved February 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166964260

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Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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#1364462 - 06/02/2016 01:38 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! - links to the Charles Todd weather folios
Here are links to the Charles Todd weather folios for the five days centred around this August 29th 1905 event, where you can find further weather maps, meteorological information and reports. Two clicks are needed to fully enlarge the images that appear when you click on any of the links below.
27th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050827.html
28th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050828.html
29th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050829.html
30th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050830.html
31st August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050831.html

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Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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#1364785 - 08/02/2016 07:27 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1905 snow events other than the August 29th blockbuster fall.

I made a search of South Australian newspapers in the Trove database for 1905 snow events in South Australia other than the blockbuster August 29th event, using the keywords snow hail (so an article needed to have both words somewhere in the text to be found by the search). I may do a more detailed search at some time in the future but this one will suffice for the present purposes. It seems there were no other widespread substantial falls in 1905. But with today's much bigger population and with modern transport and communications and snowchaseers and digicams and mobile phone cams, I would expect that light falls of snow in the Mt Lofty Ranges, Mid-North and Flinders Ranges would be more thoroughly reported now than they were "in the old days".

There were reports of a fall of snow at O.B. Flat, and other unnamed places, on Sunday 11th June, in the lower South-East eg "For the last five days the weather has not only been very wet, but intensely cold, the winds being from the south-west and south. On Sunday and Monday ... there were showers of hail in Mount Gambier, and on Sunday a fall of snow occurred at O. B. Flat. Several thunderstorms also varied the proceedings." I didn't find any reports of snow elsewhere in South Australia on that date.

On Saturday 29th July snow was reported around Mt Lofty and in the lower South-East: "SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY. Friday night in the Mount Lofty Ranges was exceedingly cold, biting showers of rain falling through the hours of darkness. At 7 o'clock on Saturday morning a fall of snow occurred, being described as "a good sprinkle, but not heavy." It lay on the ground for nearly half an hour, and at different times subsequently a few flakes filtered down from the heavens. Hail was mixed with the driving squalls of rain during the forenoon, which were separated by intervals of bright sunshine. The snow area extended for a considerable distance round Mount Lofty."

And what I'm confident but not certain was at Naracoorte: "Saturday was, we think, the coldest day we have experienced for some time. The wind blew from the south and south-west as if off an iceberg. Heavy boisterous showers of rain, hail, and sleet fell at frequent intervals during the day, and between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning, and 12 and 1 o'clock noon, several of the residents state that they saw light falls of snow. Some say that it was sleet, but many vouch that light flakes of snow fell. The falls, however, were of short duration."

At Mt Gambier there were frequent hail showers and "Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m." and "At some places in the town, in the open, during the frequent hail showers the temperature fell as low as 35° 36° and 37°, or 3 to 5 degrees above freezing point. There were showers every hour or so, and every shower was a hail fall. The highest temperature in the shade was 48.7°. Heaps of hailstones converted into masses of ice lay in every hollow or shade where they fe'l, and where the sun's rays could not reach them. Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m. The hailstones froze in masses on the roads where they fell. The cause of the extreme coldness of the day was a strong south wind direct from the Antarctic icebergs."

On Sunday 20th August light snow was reported from Clare and "the district". "CLARE. August 22.—A light fall of snow occurred here on Sunday at about noon. It was so light that it was almost invisible, and residents who anticipated having a good time snowballing were disappointed. Reports from all around the district state that the snow was fairly general, although little in quantity. Previous to the fall a heavy shower of hail passed over, and the cold was very biting."

Snow was also reported at Mt Bryan on the same day (likely refers to the town and not the mountain): " On Sunday about 1'40 p.m. snow fell and made it just a slight bit chilly."

In another article it refers to snow falling at Summertown: "SUMMERTOWN." "August 22.—There was a slight fall of snow here on Monday morning."

The above are the only references to snowfalls in SA in 1905 I've found other than the August 29th blockbuster fall. Below are the details of the articles I found and the snow-relevant texts.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 14 June 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/84835350#pstart7720080

The article refers to a fall of snow at O.B. Flat near Mt Gambier on Sunday 11th June 1905.

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"Heavy Rains.— It has rained at Mount Gambier every day since May 24, three weeks, and the last of the three has been the most wintry week of all. The duration of the spell reminds old residents of the winters between 1860 and 1870. For the last five days the weather has not only been very wet, but intensely cold, the winds being from the south-west and south. On Sunday and Monday {this was presumably 11th and 12th June - Miles} there were showers of hail in Mount Gambier, and on Sunday a fall of snow occurred at O. B. Flat. Several thunderstorms also varied the proceedings. "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84835350
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7720080
APA citation
The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1905, June 14). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84835350

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 15 June 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56674724#pstart4423501

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"MOUNT GAMBIER, June 13.— ... The last five days have been extremely wet and cold. There have been rain, hail, and thunderstorms at the Mount, and the extra of snow at O.B. Flat and other places."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56674724
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4423501
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1905, June 15). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved December 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56674724

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Saturday 24 June 1905 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/162434747

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

No date is given in the article for this snow report.

"There have been rain, hail, and thunderstorms at the Mount, and the extra of snow at O.B. Flat and other places."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162434747
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19012621
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1905, June 24). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 11. Retrieved December 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162434747

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 31 July 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4946689

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.
Friday night in the Mount Lofty Ranges was exceedingly cold, biting showers of rain falling through the hours of darkness. At 7 o'clock on Saturday morning a fall of snow occurred, being described as "a good sprinkle, but not heavy." It lay on the ground for nearly half an hour, and at different times subsequently a few flakes filtered down from the heavens. Hail was mixed with the driving squalls of rain during the forenoon, which were separated by intervals of bright sunshine. The snow area extended for a considerable distance round Mount Lofty."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4946689
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page924791
APA citation
MISCELLANEOUS NEWS. (1905, July 31). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved December 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4946689

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The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954) Tuesday 1 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147134412

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"The Weather.— Since Friday last we have experienced the coldest snap of weather during the winter. Not only has it been exceedingly cold, but it has been exceedingly
wet and boisterous. Saturday was, we think, the coldest day we have experienced
for some time. The wind blew from the south and south-west as if off an iceberg. Heavy boisterous showers of rain, hail, and sleet fell at frequent intervals during the day, and between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning, and 12 and 1 o'clock noon, several of the residents state that they saw light falls of snow. Some say that it was sleet, but many vouch that light flakes of snow fell. The falls, however, were of short duration."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134412
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17474836
APA citation
DISTRICT COUNCIL NEW ASSESSMENTS. (1905, August 1). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134412

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Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 2 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/84836437

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"The Coldest Day. — Saturday was the coldest day we have experienced this season. The observations recorded at the telegraph office show that the temperature in the shade at 9 o'clock in the morning was 37.4°. What it was during the hail showers is not recorded. At some places in the town, in the open, during the frequent hail showers the temperature fell as low as 35° 36° and 37°, or 3 to 5 degrees above freezing point. There were showers every hour or so, and every shower was a hail fall. The highest temperature in the shade was 48.7°. Heaps of hailstones converted into masses of ice lay in every hollow or shade where they fe'l, and where the sun's rays could not reach them. Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m. The hailstones froze in masses on the roads where they fell. The cause of the extreme coldness of the day was a strong south wind direct from the Antarctic icebergs."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84836437
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7720148
APA citation
The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1905, August 2). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84836437

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 23 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4953671

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"CLARE.
August 22.—A light fall of snow occurred here on Sunday at about noon. It was so light that it was almost invisible, and residents who anticipated having a good time snowballing were disappointed. Reports from all around the district state that the snow was fairly general, although little in quantity. Previous to the fall a heavy shower of hail passed over, and the cold was very biting. Heavy frosts have been experienced again this week."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4953671
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page924997
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 23). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4953671

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 23 August 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37325676

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"Mt. Bryan.
August 21.
Oh, the glorious uncertainties of the weather, as during last week we experienced terrible frosts a pie-bald Friday, wind and snow, and to end up with parching sun." ...
" On Sunday about 1'40 p.m. snow fell and made it just a slight bit chilly."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37325676
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756203
APA citation
Mt. Bryan. (1905, August 23). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37325676

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 24 August 1905 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4954101

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"SUMMERTOWN."
"August 22.—There was a slight fall of snow here on Monday morning."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4954101
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page925008
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 24). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4954101

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_________________________
Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

Top
#1367444 - 26/02/2016 00:22 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
1906 widespread snow showers Monday 27th August and on Mt Lofty August 28th.

On Monday 27th August snow showers were reported from some locations in the Mount Lofty Ranges and the Mid-North and snow was also reported on Mount Remarkable. The snow showers fell to a relatively low level in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges, where towns reporting snow including Meadows South (now Meadows), Norton's Summit, Ashton, Marble Hill, and Cherryville, Mt Barker and Nairne, and Mount Pleasant. In the Mid-North towns reporting snow included Eudunda and Kapunda and Burra. In the Flinders Ranges a snow cover was seen on Mount Remarkable. There were isolated reports from the South-East, and "snow is reported to have been seen by a well-known lady near Maitland."

My impression is that the snow fell from individual shower-clouds rather than extended areas of mid-level cloud. I speculate these may have been cumulonimbus "coldies". Wind direction was reported to be from the south. Hail and sleet were also mentioned in some articles. Several reports mention the beauty of the snow showers witnessed. The ground was generally very wet due to considerable rainfall in preceding days and in some of the towns where snowflakes were observed reaching the ground it melted as it landed or soon afterwards, either due to the wet ground or falling rain, hail or sleet.

There were also snow showers on Mt Lofty on Tuesday 28th. The weather In the city [Adelaide] on that day was described as: "The weather remained bitterly cold on Tuesday, and city residents were not surprised to learn that snow had fallen lightly in the hills. Piercing blasts of wind from the south swept through the streets in a most uncomfortable manner, while squalls of driving rain unmercifully lashed those unfortunate enough to be out."

A report from Mt Pleasant suggests snow might have been seen on the two preceding days as well, but it's ambigous. The report says: "Mount Pleasant, August 28. During the last three mornings we have experienced heavy frosts, followed by piercing winds and snow during the day. Stock of all kinds are feelling the cold intensely."

There is a report of snow on the preceding Saturday 25th August in the Kapunda district. "We have since been inform d that there was snow in places in this district on Saturday."

Below are the snow-relevant texts from most of the newspaper reports I found by doing a search of the Trove South Australian database for 1906 April to November inclusive, using the keywords snow hail. This returns only articles with both snow and hail somewhere in the text. It misses articles containing only one of those words, and articles where there is no correct spelling of one or both of those words. The information in missed articles will sometimes be in other articles on the same snowfall. If the word snow only is used as the search keyword there are a lot of false returns where snow is used in another context eg "white as snow".

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Saturday 1 September 1906 Page 43.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/88126754

{quoting entire article}

SNOW IN THE HILLS.

Sunday night was exceedingly cold, even on the plains, and people living in the hills districts retired to bed in full expectation of seeing the mountain slopes and crests snow-clad in the morning. There is a peculiar keenness in the air prior to a snowfall, so that residents on the high levels usually are able fairly accurately to forecast a fall. Those who expected to see snow on the Mount Lofty Ranges on Monday morning [27th August - Miles] were not disappointed. Shortly after half-past 6 o'clock the feather-like flakes began to descend, and by 7 o'clock a large area of country bore a mantle of white. Then in places the fall ceased, but it began again about 7.30, and for half an hour there was a steady shower of snowflakes. Trees, housetops, bushes, and everything else carried snow, and the blending of the white with the varied tints of the foliage made a picture most beautiful to gaze upon. The fall extended along the top of the range from a point some distance south of Mount Lofty station to north of Norton's Summit and eastward, but the snow could not be seen from the city. Owing to the weather conditions being unfavorable the snow did not lie long on the ground, the thawing process beginning almost as soon as it settled.
Our Aldgate correspondent wrote on Monday morning:— "A beautiful fall of snow occurred here early this morning. A slight fall took place about 6.30. and shortly after 7 o'clock there was a heavy one, which lasted about half an hour. It was sufficient to settle thickly on the grass, bushes, fences, and roofs of houses." The heavy fall last year in the same neighborhood occurred on August 29, and it has become quite the customary thing for snow to descend about the end of this month. There was another fall of snow at Mount Lofty on Tuesday morning. Although the flakes continued to descend for about half an hour, the fall was not so heavy as on the previous morning. Shortly after noon a thick fall was experienced on the top of the mount, and a beautiful scene was presented. The snow soon melted, however, under the combined attentions of sun and rain.

Mount Bryan, August 27. The weather to-day has been peculiar and extraordinary. Hail and snow have fallen in quick succession, and a thin coat of snow now covers the ground. At this time last year only one day later, a heavy snowstorm was experienced, the snow in some of the gullies being 14 ft. thick, and several fences were entirely invisible. At that time, however, the fall could be seen for weeks afterwards, but to-day it has been somewhat light and feathery. All the residents are eagerly looking forward to a heavier fall, and snowballing parties are being formed in anticipation.

Mount Gambier, August 27. Snow fell at Mount Gambier West today, which was the coldest day recorded here for 20 years.

Norton's Summit, August 27. For the past four years in succession the Mount Lofty Ranges have been treated to a real snowstorm during either July or August. At an early hour this morning heavy showers of rain fell. Afterwards the atmosphere gradually became dense with snow instead of rain. The early morning storm, however, was of short duration, but of great beauty, calling forth words of admiration from those who were fortunate enough to witness it. though the snow thawed almost immediately.
At Ashton, Marble Hill, and Cherryville the fall was much heavier than it was here, and children on their way to school raced along the roads carrying snowballs, which they had secured further eastward, under their arms, and they treated passing vehicles to a few missiles, but doled the snow out in small quantities as their supply was somewhat limited. A few years ago snow was almost unheard of in this part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, but now we seem to be favored with an annual treat. Last week the rain was so heavy that many landslips occurred, some of them being the largest which have taken place for years. In one instance three large fruit trees, firmly embedded in the soil, slipped into a creek. To the owner it looked like the work of an embryo earthquake.

Meadows South, August 27. Heavy rain has fallen during this last few days, and this morning we had a fall of snow. The crops are looking remarkably well, and there is every promise of a good season.

Uraidla, August 27. To-day we have had a heavy fall of snow, which remained on the ground for some considerable time. The hills around the Mount Lofty Ranges and also the gullies wore the picture of purity, and it was a sight rarely seen. Old and young alike were out in it, and quite enjoyed themselves.

Scott's Creek, August 27. On Monday, at 7.15 a.m., we were favored with a sharp fall of snow. It was lovely while it lasted. Then at 11 a.m. another more beautiful fall came. The local school children revelled in it. It was quite a treat to watch the expressions of some small children from Carrieton, who are not accustomed to rain, to say nothing of snow. The creeks and dams here are running bankers everywhere, and everything points to a most prosperous season.

Echunga, August 27. The weather during the last week has been the wettest and coldest this year. On Friday last a heavy downpour continued all day till creeks and gutters were running a banker. Bridges and footpaths were taken right away, while men were constantly on the watch with shovels and rakes to turn the water from doing any damage. The roads are in a critical condition, and the gullies and paddocks are nothing but a sheet of water. To-day rain, hail, sleet, and snow have been falling at intervals, the first fall being at 7.20 a.m. The snow was not so heavy as last year, and it melted as soon as it came in contact with the earth.

Grunthal, August 27. During the past week the weather has been exceptionally cold and boisterous. Rain has fallen heavily every day, and this morning a slight fall of snow was experienced, continuing for about a quarter of an hour, but it was insufficient to be noticeable after its contact with the earth, as it dissolved instantly.

Mount Barker, August 27. Snow has fallen here to-day, but not in any great quantity.

Burra, August 27. A little snow fell to-day, but not enough to whiten the ground for long.

Forest Range, August 27. Since the heavy rain on Friday, which caused the creeks to run bank-high, the weather has been bitterly cold. Consequently no surprise was caused when snow began to fall this morning.

Nairne, August 27. To-day we had two very considerable and pretty falls of snow and sleet at about 10 a.m., and again at noon, but the rain swept the snow all too quickly out of sight. While it lasted the children of the local school were permitted to watch it. The temperature went down to 33 deg, at noon.

Gumeracha, August 27. A fall of snow occurred here this afternoon, and it is still extremely cold.

Truro, August 27. Snow and hail fell here this morning at 11 o'clock. It was a light fall, but the weather was extremely cold. There were heavy showers of rain yesterday and to-day.

Lobethal, August 27. The weather was bitterly cold to-day, and heavy falls of snow have been occurring all day. The effect of the falling snow was pretty, but owing to the wet state of the ground the snow soon thawed. It is probable that more snow will fall during the night, as the wind is steady in the south.

Riverton, August 28. Yesterday slight falls of snow occurred on the Peters' Hill range, but hail and rain soon obliterated it. The crops are beginning to show an improvement, after having been at a standstill for some weeks.

Eudunda, August 27. To-day between 12 and 1 o'clock we had a beautiful fall of snow. The children coming home from school had a delightful time.

Chain of Ponds, August 27. During the past few days the Ponds Creek has been overflowing its banks. The cricket oval was completely covered. To-day there were a few light falls of snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88126754
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8532161
APA citation
SNOW IN THE HILLS. (1906, September 1). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 43. Retrieved February 14, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88126754

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The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954) Friday 31 August 1906 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147140688

{only snow-relevant text quoted}
I only lightly corrected this item on Trove to improve its readability - Miles.

"Falls of Snow.—Falls of snow are of uch rare occurrence throughout Australia that when they do occur they are viewed with more than ordinary interest. During the week there have been fails more or less heavy in various parts of Australia. Now and then very light falls of snow have been reported in the Sonth-East, but they have only been uthentisated by the few. It is reported that snow fell at Mount Gambier West on Monday. There were further falls of snow in the Mount Lofty Ranges on Tuesday, and Riverton and Eudunda reports falls of snow on Monday. A remarkable fall of snow - occurred along the whole of the sonthern slope of the Dividing Range in Victoria on Monday. At Ballarat it was the heaviest experienced for 40 years. Business there was partly interrupted, and all telephone and telegraph wires were down. The surround ing comjtry bore a heavy mantle of white, and presented a picturesque spectacle. Owing to the. snow lying thickly on the railway line the Adelaide express was unable to run to time, and for the con venience of local passengers a special was LUn from Ballarat to Melbourne. The Adelaide express reached Melbourne shortly after midday, or over two hours late. In the Bairnsdale district the snow was also lying on the ground to a depth never known before."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147140688
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17475476
APA citation
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 1906. (1906, August 31). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147140688

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954) Friday 31 August 1906 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146310007

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS.
OUR WEEKLY NEWS-BUDGET.
Public holiday on Monday.

Snow fell in the Hills districts on the 27th inst.

Mount Pleasant, August 28.
During the last three mornings we have experienced heavy frosts, followed by piercing winds and snow during the day. Stock of all kinds are feelling the cold intensely.

Callington, August 29.
Awfully cold weather has been experienced during the past few days, although we had not the snowfall which happened in the Hills on Monday. The severest frost of the season occurred this morning.

Harrogate, August 29.
The weather for the past week has been very variable, rain, hail, snow, frost, and sunshine being alternated. On Monday night 20 points of rain fell, but to the surprise of residents there was a severe frost on Tuesday morning. However, it began to rain again about 7.0 a.m. The weather to-day is delightfully fine, with a frost to start with.

Lobethal, August 29.
The weather during the past few days has been extremely cold, and no surprise was felt when on Monday morning a heavy fall of snow was experienced. Although the fall lasted a good time the snow thawed immediately on reaching the ground, and the fun which was looked forward to by old and young was missed. Last night one of the heaviest frosts for this winter occurred.

Nairne, August 27.
On Monday we had several slight falls of snow and three good falls at 10 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m., but the heavy rains which followed soon destroyed all traces of the snow. The pupils of the local school were allowed to watch the chief falls, and afterwards the formation of snow was explained to them.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146310007
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17354182
APA citation
THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS. (1906, August 31). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146310007

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 29 August 1906 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/5096109

{quoting whole article}

WINTRY WEATHER,
FURTHER SNOWFALLS.

The weather remained bitterly cold on Tuesday, and city residents were not surprised to learn that snow had fallen lightly in the hills. Piercing blasts of wind from the south swept through the streets in a most uncomfortable manner, while squalls of driving rain unmercifully lashed those unfortunate enough to be out. Prospects, however, are more cheerful. The weather moderated during the afternoon, squalls being less frequent, and the meteorological report promises that the approaching "high" will bring more comfortable conditions. Many low-lying districts in the suburbs remain in a partially submerged state, and the main-creeks are still running high. The heavy rainfall of the past few days makes the prospects of the wheat harvest very good.

There was another fall of snow at Mount Lofty on Tuesday morning. Although the flakes continued to descend for about half an hour, the fall was not so heavy as on the previous morning. Shortly after noon a thick fall was experienced on the top of the mount, and a beautiful scene was presented. The snow soon melted, however, under the combined attentions of sun and rain.

Lobethal, August 27.
The weather was bitterly cold to-day, and heavy falls of snow have been occurring all day. The effect of the falling snow was pretty, but owing to the wet state of the ground, the snow soon thawed. It is probable that more snow will fall during the night, as the wind is steady in the south.

Riverton, August 28.
Yesterday slight falls of snow occurred on the Peters' Hill range, but hail and rain soon obliterated it. The crops are beginning to show an improvement, after having been at a standstill for some weeks.

Eudunda, August 27.
To-day between 12 and 1 o'clock we had a beautiful fall of snow. The children coming home from school had a delightful time.

Chain of Ponds, August 27.
During the past few days the Ponds Creek has been overflowing its banks. The cricket oval was completely covered. To-day there were a few light falls of snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5096109
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page928697
APA citation
WINTRY WEATHER. (1906, August 29). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved February 12, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5096109

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Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954) Thursday 30 August 1906 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96966402/9488870

{only quoting snow-relevant text from article}

"Steady falls of snow occurred in various parts of the State on Sunday night and Mon- day [Monday 27th August - Miles], the Mt. Lofty ranges receiving the bulk of the fall, though at both Mt. Bryan in the north and Mt. Gambier in the south-east slight falls were recorded. Mt. Barker, Meadows, Echunga and most the places on the Mt. Lofty and Willunga ranges report extreme cold, hail, and sleet also."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96966402
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9488870
APA citation
LOCAL NEWS. (1906, August 30). Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96966402

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954) Friday 31 August 1906 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146309986

This article had been quoted from Trove without any corrections.

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"Wintry Weather.—The climatic conditions at Mount Barker and the Hills | districts generally during the past week iiarc been exceptionally cold and wintry. On Friday heavy rain fell, and as a result the flood experienced here was the largest for the season, the creeks overflowing and all low-lying land being inundated with I, water. Satiirdayand Sunday were showery, and on Monday rain, hail, sleet, snow, and sunshine were alternated, though the fall of flakes was not heavy. At Mount Lofty and other places in that neighborhood there were plentiful falls of snow on Monday and Tuesday, and in Victoria on the latter day the ground in some places was covered with a mantle of whiteness, and railway and vehicular traffic and postal and telegraphic business was considerably interfered with. The weather here on Wednesday and yester day was beautifully fine, ..."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146309986
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17354181
APA citation
GENERAL NEWS. (1906, August 31). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 12, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146309986

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 29 August 1906 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37323341

{quoting entire article}

Snow.

On Monday [27th - Miles] the wind was very keen, and though the sun penetrated the clouds rain fell at intervals. At about 10.15 a.m. snow commenced to fall, and continued for about 20 minutes, but it melted as soon as it touched the ground. Later the sun shone out hot, and subsequently another additional instalment of snow was witnessed. Snowballing was not indulged in, though some of the young and old fry did their best to get a ball or two, but the nearest they could get to it was a mixture of mud and snow. About dinner time a shower of hail fell and the remainder of the day was very cold, the evening being particularly so, and residents kept a look out for more snow, but none fell. On Tuesday one of the most severe frosts for the season was seen. In the gardens old Jack Frost did much damage, while at the outside watertaps he prevented the water running until old Sol came on the scene. The remaining portion of yesterday was changeable.

{end of article}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37323341
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756592
APA citation
Snow. (1906, August 29). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37323341

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 31 August 1906 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108378502

{quoting entire article}

SNOW IN KAPUNDA.
Monday was an intensely cold day with rain and hail. About ten o'clock in the morning there was a light fall of snow in the town. Further out it was heavier, and three or four miles distant, near Kidman's farm. to the north-west, it accumulated in places to the depth of nearly a foot. On Tuesday morning there was a hard frost, and the first ice for the season was seen. There was a fall of snow in Kapunda on August 27 last year. We have since been inform d that there was snow in places in this district on Saturday. Snow fell in a large number of places in the State on Monday.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108378502
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10567159
APA citation
General New. (1906, August 31). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108378502

*******************************************************************************************************

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 31 August 1906 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108378460

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

This item appears to have been written on August 30 - Miles.

"—A Cold Time.—
Eudunda is still upholding its reputation as a cold part of the State. During the past few days the weather has been intensely cold, and we have had rain, hail, and snow at intervals. On Monday [27th - Miles] between noon and 1 o'clock we had a fine fall of snow. The children coming home from school had a merry time catching the flakes. On Tuesday morning we had a severe frost, but the day was cold and wet. Good seasonable weather."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108378460
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10567157
APA citation
EUDUNDA. (1906, August 31). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108378460

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Saturday 8 September 1906 Page 13.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/163081669

{quoting snow-relevant text only}
Coomoroo is near to Ororoo.

THE SEAS0N.

COOMOOROO. August 29.—The weather is indeed cold. Yesterday afternoon a fall o snow took place.

MELROSE. August 28.— ... Sunday night was bitterly cold, and it was not surprising yesterday to find that all the top of Mount Remarkable was white with snow. The clouds which hung on the mount obscured the view more or less most of the day, but the snow apparently remained till noon or later. This is the second fall of snow on Mount Remarkable this winter, and it is just within a year that it was completely covered: the snow on that occasion lasted over a week.

YONGALA. August 29.—The weather is intensely cold, with heavy frosts. On Monlav we experienced a slight fall of snow, the first of the winter, and since then there have been several severe hailstorms.

YONGALA ESTATE. September 1.—The weather during the past week has been unusually cold, and on two or three occasions snow has fallen for several minutes together. The wind and rain, however, did not allow of its remaining long on the ground, except in sheltered places.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163081669
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19065941
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1906, September 8). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 13. Retrieved February 14, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163081669

**********************************************************************************************************

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 1 September 1906 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/77583844

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"SNOW.—There was a slight fall of snow at Peweena (Mr. J. Kennedy's residence), seven miles north of Mount G mbier, on Tues lay [28th August - Miles]. The snow, however, melted as it fell, and there was no opportunity afforded for a game at snowballs."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583844
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7718842
APA citation
The Border Watch,. (1906, September 1). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583844

*********************************************************************************************

Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser (SA : 1878 - 1922) Friday 7 September 1906 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/216734966

{only snow-related text quoted}

"Balgowan
September 3.
THE WEATHER: — Mild weather with soaking rain interspersed with showers of hail prevailed during the past week The air was intensely cold and snow is reported to have been seen by a well-known lady near Maitland."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216734966
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page24251236
APA citation
Balgowan. (1906, September 7). Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser (SA : 1878 - 1922), p. 3. Retrieved February 14, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216734966

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Monday 27 August 1906 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/201882711

{I've quoted the whole article}

"THE WEATHER. The weather office reported on Monday:
—Further rains have fallen in South Australia, chiefll over the southern areas, and the weather still continues cold, squally, and showery, whilst snow is reported this morning on the Mount Lofty Ranges. The map shows that the "high" which was to the west on Saturday still lies on the western side of the Great Bight, and has increased in energy, whilst the disturbance which was shown off Tasmania appears to have moved in a north-easterly direction between New Zealand and the continent. Heavy rains have fallen throughout Victoria and Tasmania, and the showers have also extended into the Riverina of New South Wales. The weather around Tasmania and through Bass Straits is still reported cold and squally, with hail Further showers may be expected in this State, more especially over the southern districts, with cold, southerly winds. Squally conditions are still indicated from Kangaroo Island eastward."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201882711
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22452065
APA citation
THE WEATHER. The weather office reported on Monday:. (1906, August 27). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 1. Retrieved February 12, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201882711

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Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 7 July 1906 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/77582535

"NARRACOORTE.
(From our own Correspondent.)
July 2. [Monday - Miles]
... We have had exceptionally cold and boisterous weather all the week. At times the wind has been blowing a gale, whilst heavy rain has been falling. The country around is pretty well flooded, the creeks being high and the water holes full and overflowing. It has also been exceptionally cold Several of the resident say they saw snow falling on Friday [29th June - Miles] morning."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77582535
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7718762
APA citation
NARRACOORTE. (1906, July 7). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 14, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77582535

**********************************************************************************************************

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 26 July 1906 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/57021482

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"MELROSE, July 19.—Steady rain set in early this morning, and fell continuously for hours. The weather for the past three or four days has been in marked contrast to the mild conditions of last week, and it was not surprising when the clouds permitted a view of the top of Mount Remarkable this morning, to find that there had been a heavy fall of snow. The top remained white for some time, but the clouds which hunr about prevented a good view being obtained of more than a portion at once."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57021482
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4424914
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1906, July 26). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved February 18, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57021482

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 8 October 1906 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56683839

{quoting only snow-relevant text}
Item published on Monday 8 October so October 4 was a Thursday and October 3 was a Wednesday so probably the snowfall was on Wednesday 3rd October - Miles.

"JAMESTOWN. October 4.— ... On Wednesday the annual picnic was held at part of Canowie Estate. A novelty was experienced for picnickers in the shape of a fall of snow for a short time in the afternoon."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56683839
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4426740
APA citation
A ROUGH PASSAGE. (1906, October 8). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved February 11, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56683839

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Website http://sasnows.com
Email: weather at internode.on.net

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