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#1195971 - 28/05/2013 03:18 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
A Bureau of Meteorology article called "LOW-LEVEL SNOW" is published on their web site at http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/environ/snow.shtml . They say "Low level snowfalls, though rare, have recurred throughout the 20th century, and affected a surprisingly large area of the country. Some of the more memorable events follow."

I can find three references to locations in South Australia in the article:

"In winter 1951 snow blanketed most of Tasmania twice within three weeks (19-20 July and 9 August), blocking roads and interrupting mail services. On 9 August snow had to be shovelled from the streets of Queenstown (191 metres elevation). Light snow also fell in the streets and suburbs of Melbourne, and in Adelaide as well during the July event."

"On 23 June 1981, large areas of western and northwestern Victoria were mantled in white. So much snow fell at lower levels of the Dividing Range that electricity transmission lines broke under the weight. In South Australia snow fell as far north as Wilpena and Blinman."

"... the not-widely-known event of 21 October 1995 was particularly impressive for the extent of its northward penetration across central Australia, and its occurrence in late spring. Snow fell to 200 metres above sea level over South Australia's Flinders Ranges, and Broken Hill registered a maximum of just 5°C, its lowest recorded maximum in any month. This cold snap resulted in record low temperatures as far north as Wave Hill (in the Northern Territory)."

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#1197032 - 02/06/2013 09:45 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
bd bucketingdown Offline
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Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
Yep (your Nairne pic on previous page back a bit of thread that is...shown below again), well that is the main st Unstable The big building on the right background is the Miller Arms hotel and the building to the right of that is and old barn now Millies bakery. The building a little in the forground of that partly obscured is the Albert Mill and old flour mill now a residence
There is another picture I have seen with 2 ft of snow in the Main st, Nairne, same street as above, not sure what year that was though!
Thanks for that US.
Cheers Ian


Edited by bd bucketingdown (02/06/2013 09:48)

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#1197035 - 02/06/2013 09:55 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6033
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
Found this also UNS, good one snow Nairne


Snow at Nairne
DESCRIPTION

NAIRNE: A boy standing beside a large snowball and a snowman built in a fenced area after a heavy snowfall at Nairne
ca 1910


Edited by bd bucketingdown (02/06/2013 09:56)

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#1197219 - 03/06/2013 04:36 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
Thanks Ian for identifying some of the buildings in the Nairne landscape photo smile I visited Nairne a while back to see if I could find a location where I could photo the same scene as it is today but without success. There's a lot of trees in the Nairne suburbs that weren't there in 1910. It'll be a lot easier next time, with your building descriptions to help position me.
That's the biggest SA snowman I've seen in a photo by a long way eek That boy may hold the record for the largest SA snowman on a surviving photograph. Another record to add to your collection Max if you're reading this. If the boy's still around today he should apply for inclusion in the Guinness Book of Records.

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#1198248 - 10/06/2013 01:55 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Markus Offline
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Registered: 02/12/2010
Posts: 2108
Loc: Clare, SA
Originally Posted By: Unstable
1908 June 21st-22nd - one of the biggest Adelaide Hills snowfalls in recorded history


I just happened to stumble upon this from I assume that event (and I can't find any information thus far on this event for Mount Bryan in this thread) and what it reads is truly quite astonishing. I think this may be the biggest snowfall I can ever remember reading about in SA's history?

I'll only write out parts of the article but this particular event was for Mount Bryan June 1908.

It starting snowing on a Sunday at 10pm and continued in some places through most of the Monday. Snow was reported as 4-8 inches deep and this measurement was taken on the Monday morning so likely depths were quite a bit higher.

The snow fell on a Monday and on the Saturday snow was still many feet thick in drifts, aka still into the metres deep.
Snow drifts were found at 5 feet deep!!! Snow was armpit deep in places.

Perhaps more amazingly on the Tuesday the temperature was below 0 degrees for most of the day. That means it could be suggested the temperature was below 0 for almost 2 days straight!! Now quote "In many places the snow is like so much glass, it having been frozen hard". Im not sure which day this was occuring. Another amazing thing, iced over areas.

The link to this newpaper article.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45020662

I believe 5ft drifts would have to be the deepest recorded snow that has been observed since settlement. Even 8 inches deep would be pushing some of the deepest general covers reported (and 8 inches likely being under the actual depth). I just find this amazing. I wonder how long it did eventually take to completely melt.
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#1198249 - 10/06/2013 02:18 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Markus Offline
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Registered: 02/12/2010
Posts: 2108
Loc: Clare, SA
Just found this on the Burry history site.

"1908

Monday 22nd June, heavy snow in the early morning with thaw about 9 a.m. Persisted all day in sheltered places. Another heavy fall at 2 p.m. melted quickly.

Tuesday 30 June snow on the hills and record fall to that date at Mt. Bryan, Burra Creek froze over in the town sufficiently to support children."

Could "to that date" possibly mean a bigger event occured at some point after the 1908 event?

Things brings up another point that the big fall at Mount Bryan was on the 29th being the Monday, so a separate event to the Adelaide Hills event. That's also 2 snow events in 8 days. That must have been an incredibly cold week.


Edited by Markus (10/06/2013 02:27)
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#1198250 - 10/06/2013 04:24 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Great find there Markus! Personal accounts are just so valuable because they go beyond the usually fairly brief reports sent in by the newspaper correspondents of the day. I've corrected the electronic text on Trove to a fair degree of accuracy and I've pasted (plastered) the full article below. I agree that if the report is pretty accurate in its observations and the author has not taken some flights of fancy, it would surely be one of the most intense and long-lasting snow events in any district in our recorded history. Somewhere between the time pen was first put to paper in South Australia and the present, the greatest snowfall in the Mt Bryan district and in any SA district occurred and this could be it.

Re "That's also 2 snow events in 8 days." the Barrier Miner article is in the edition with the date Tuesday 30 June 1908 on it, but the article says at the beginning "On Sunday night of last week ..." so one fall not two.

Over the past two weeks I've spent several hours correcting the electronic Trove version of a long article in the Chronicle on this snow event. I've almost completed the corrections and I'll post it here later this week. It includes mostly brief reports from correspondents in numerous places in country SA from Meadows and Bull Creek in the south to Orrorroo in the north.

I've just searched said article and I can find two reference to Mt Bryan.

This short entry: "MOUNT BRYAN. June 22.— On Sunday about 9.30 p.m. snow commenced to fall, and it continued during the night. The country presents a beautiful sight."

And this one: "MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 22.— The snow is a dazzling sight to-day, there being a complete mantle of white everywhere. There were heavy falls all night and thia morning, and cattle, horses, and sheep are travelling about trying to find dry places to feed upon. The snow remained on the flats all day long, and will be seen on the ranges of Mount Bryan for several weeks, as it lies 6 and 7 ft. deep. During the storm native birds sought protection under verandahs."

Now for the full article referenced by Markus:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45020662

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Tuesday 30 June 1908 Page 3

"SNOW AT MOUNT BRYAN.

An old Barrierite, now residing at Mount Bryan East (S.A.), writes:--On Sunday night of last week we had a change from rain to snow, which commenced to fall about 10 o'clock p.m., and continued all through the night. By daylight on Monday morning the
country was covered with snow for miles in every direction, being about 4 to 8 inches thick. The fall continued nearly all day on Monday, increasing the depth of the lying snow in many places. It was a magnificent sight. Although I have seen many a fall in this locality, I have never seen one like this, and I enjoyed a good game of snowballing. The Mount Bryan Range is still (Saturday) covered with snow, which in some places is still many feet thick in drifts. (Would not the Broken Hill folks have some fun if they got such a fall up there? There would not be much trade done that day.) The snow can be seen for miles off in all directions. The most interesting experience we had here was to see the stock travelling up and down and around the paddocks unable to get any feed. Several of the farmers were out looking after their sheep and lambs walking through snow 5ft. deep. My brother told me that in places he got into snow up to his armpits, and found that he could get out of it by rolling better than he could walk through it, which he did more for fun than anything else. He lost a large number of lambs through the fall of snow. Although I have been in, and visiting continually the neighborhood for over 40 years, and have seen several snow-storms, I have never seen anything to equal this one--being so heavy and continuous. The glass was on Tuesday down to 32 degrees nearly all day, so you may guess it was cold. There is plenty of ice about now. I was out for a drive to-day. In many places the snow is like so much glass, it having been frozen hard.

Many of the Broken Hill people think that all the mischievous boys and girls live in Broken Hill. But such is not the case. For the boys and girls going to school in this locality took the trouble to make large snow men, and to put them in the middle of the road, which has caused the horses in most places to fight shy of the road and run into the fence. Other horses not being used to it would not pass the big white man in the middle of the track. The children deem it great fun, not thinking what damage they might cause. I have not heard of any accidents, and the people take it in p part, although in some cases it has given them a little trouble. All know that snow does not come every day, so we enjoy it as well as the children."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45020662
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3528803
APA citation
SNOW AT MOUNT BRYAN. (1908, June 30). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45020662

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#1198317 - 10/06/2013 20:39 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Markus Offline
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Registered: 02/12/2010
Posts: 2108
Loc: Clare, SA
Ah yes you are indeed right unstable smile Burra history site has an error it seems. The other report you put up of the event suggests drifts in the 6-7ft range. Also states the snow will be seen for several weeks.
That's actually pretty hard to imagine in South Australia, a snow capped mountain for a few weeks. Boy I would love to see something like that again one day.
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#1198336 - 11/06/2013 02:28 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
"Also states the snow will be seen for several weeks" - yes if only ! I think the writer was being a bit optimistic there.
Re "Boy I would love to see something like that again one day" - unless climate change significantly reduces the likelihood of big snow events, I think it's very likely SA will continue to have snowfalls of that magnitude from time to time, so you may get your wish smile

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#1198533 - 12/06/2013 05:35 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
More on the 1908 June 21st-22nd snow event.

Judging by this article in the Chronicle, and the previous newspaper articles posted, this is one of the biggest South Australian snowfalls in recorded history! I've corrected the original electronic version on Trove to a pretty high level of accuracy - see my comment at the bottom of this post for more information about the level of corrections.

I don't think there's been a snowfall of this magnitude since 1951.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/88382861

"Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Saturday 27 June 1908 Page 42"

IN THE COUNTRY

Crystal Brook, June 21. A hailstorm, which passed over to-day, was the heaviest ever known in the district. It was followed by heavy rain, three-quarters of an inch being registered at 7 o'clock. The weather tonight is threatening.

Tanunda, June 22. The weather has been cold and boisterous since Saturday and there was a heavy fall of snow on the Barossa Ranges during Sunday night. Kaiser Stuhl and the surrounding hills are still covered with snow. Some enthusiastic residents have gone out to indulge in snowballing this afternoon.

Springton, June 22. Snow began to fall early this morning and continued for four hours. The ground

Norton's Summit, June 22. The residents of the hills districts were favored with a beautiful sight on Monday morning. The snow had begun the previous evening, and had fallen steadily all the night, and morning dawn revealed a glistening spectacle. But a greater treat was yet in store when a snowstorm, lasting over two hours, occurred. The children on their way to school regarded the fall as high sport. Snowballing was the order of the day, and the children's shrieks of delight as they shook their coats and umbrellas added to the interest of the scene. The view from the top of the Ashton hill was magnificent, and away towards the Marble Hill Ranges the snow was much thicker. The viceregal residence had undergone a transformation. The creepers and ivy, which look so beautiful in the summer, carried festoons of snow, while the roof shone like a veritable English manor house. The snow this season evoked especial interest, as there had been no fall last year. Previous to last winter there had been snow for several successive years, and it began to bear that aspect of familiarity which prevents particular notice.

Truro, June 22. Very rough, squally weather prevailed here last night and 46 points of rain was registered. Snow fell here at intervals this morning, and the weather was extremely cold; heavy showers of rain were still falling at 3 p.m., and there has been a lighter fall on the Murray Flats.

Basket Range, June 22. Very heavy rains have been experienced here since Saturday afternoon. About 3 in. of rain had fallen up till Sunday night, and as a result the creeks are overflowing, and in some places the creek banks and garden soil have been washed away. In addition landslips have occurred on some parts of the roads.

Campbelltown, June 22. The heavy rains of the last day or two have caused all the creeks in this district to overflow and damage is reported in all directions. Several gardens have been inundated and plants and soil washed away. In many places the roads have been completely covered with floodwaters. On the road from Campbelltown to Magill at the Fourth Creek, where the stream is forded, a two-wheeled vehicle on Sunday was swept off the roadway and carried through the fence. The horse was extricated by a number of men. A number of drivers on arrival at the spot preferred not to risk crossing the stream until it had subsided, and were obliged to turn back without completing their journey.

Elliston, June 22. The heaviest rain in the district for over 20 years fell on Saturday and Sunday, Elliston registering 215 points, Talia 277, and Colton 170 points During the fortnight the average rainfall was 5 in., throughout the district. Water is lying everywhere, and some houses and the Elliston Institute and post-office are surrounded, although not flooded. Much damage has been done to the roads. Several houses in the town of Bramfield are reported to have been flooded. The weather is still showery.

Crystal Brook, June 22. Another hailstorm passed over at 4 o'clock this morning, and was heavier than the one on Sunday afternoon. Nearly 2 in. of rain fell. The rain has been heavy throughout the district.

Brinkworth, June 22 9.23 a.m. Heavy rain fell here all day Sunday and during last night, an inch and forty points being registered. There is every appearance of more rain.

Kingston, June 23. Heavy weather has prevailed along the coast since Thursday. Four inches of rain have fallen in four days. Reports from inland show that the lagoons and lowlands are flooded. The schooner Monarch, which sailed to Port Augusta from here, with a cargo of sleepers, returned for shelter, and went ashore at Grassy Flat, nine miles west of Kingston, having dragged two anchors over a mile. The vessel floated off on Friday, and anchored in deep water half a mile from shore, but was again struck by a heavy squall, and was driven aground. The cargo will have to be unloaded before the schooner can be refloated. There are no rocks on this part of the coast, but the vessel bumped heavily while drifting ashore, and it is thought likely that she has suffered damage. The schooner is now awaiting means of lightering the cargo. She is doomed to delay, as there have been storms ever since her arrival, over a fortnight ago. Fishermen are lending all the assistance possible.

PETERSBURG, June 22.—The heaviest fall of snow on record here occurred last night and this morning. The weather on Saturday and Sunday had been bitterly cold, and about 10 o'clock on Sunday night those who were unfortunate or hardy enough to be outside noticed that sleet was falling. The weather grew perceptibly colder, and about midnight snow fell in earnest, continuing without intermission until about 8 o'clock this morning, after which it fell at intervals during the day. As far as the eye can reach everything is covered with a thick mantle of snow, which even in the most exposed and level places is never less than four or five inches in depth, while in some places it is heaped up a depth of a foot or more. Some of the young trees and shrubs, the limbs of which were already rendered brittle by the excessive cold of the past few weeks, have lost branches by reason of the heavy weight of snow. The roofs of the houses, the windowsills, and any crevice or hollow is covered deep, and the railway lines are completely obliterated. The drivers have had a good deal of difficulty in distinguishing the signals against the white background, and also find it hard to keep to time on account of the slipperyness of the rails and the necessity for forcing their way through several inches of snow. The ranges in the distance look exceedingly beautiful when the sun is shining. Snowballing, of course, is general, and trade is almost suspended. Even the most staid business men appear to have dropped 20 years and are frolicking with the youngest. Neither is spared, and if any unlucky individual shows annoyance he is singled out for special attention for the roysterers.

Photographers are busy, as also are the makers of snowmen. In fact, everybody is laying in a supply of chillblains and colds. The milk supply suffered this morning, as many of the cows which were unprotected by stables or rugs gave no milk. There is every indication of more snow, and the weather is bitterly cold.

LYNDOCH, June 22.—The adjacent hills were this morning capped with snow which had fallen during the night. They presented a beautiful spectacle when the clouds lifted and the sun shone on the white surface.

GULNARE June 22.—On Sunday evening heavy dark clouds gathered in the west, and this morning the ground was white with snow. The Bundaleer hills presented a lovely appearance. Old residents said it was the heaviest fall ever experienced here.

NAIRNE. June 22.—Snow has fallen frequently during the day, and the falls have been heavy, but on account of the rain it has not remained on the ground long. Some of the hills looked beautifully white, and the young people enjoyed the pastime of snowballing.

BALHANNAH, June 22.—Snow has been falling at intervals all day.

MOUNT TORRENS, June 22.—At about 7 a.m. to-day snow began to fall, and it continued until eleven o'clock, when the sun shone out. The country all round was coated fully 2 in. thick. Outdoor work was out of the question, and so snowballing was freely indulged in, while large snow balls and snowwheels were made on the hillsides.

OAKBANK. June 22.—To-day there have been continual falls of snow, but it melted as soon as it touched the ground.

ALDGATE, June 22,—Early this morning a beautiful fall of snow took place, and was watched by residents, some of the younger generation indulging in snowballing. Several nice falls have taken place during the day.

BELALIE NORTH, June 22.—One of the heaviest snowstorms experienced for 20 years took place last night. The earth was covered with 6 in. of snow this morning.

BURRA, June 22.—When residents got up this morning they found the whole country covered with snow, and there were further falls up to 11 o'clock. The fall locally was not so heavy as that of some previous years, but there was plenty of ammunition for snowballing.

TEROWIE, June 22.—After several days of extremely cold weather a heavy fall of snow was experienced last night, and this morning the country side had a beautiful carpet of white. It has been snowing off and on all the morning. Snowballing was entered into with vigor, and pedestrians were assailed on every hand.

HOUGHTON, June 22.—This morning snow began to fall about 7 o'clock, and continued almost without a break for two hours. Unfortunately the ground was so wet that the snow thawed as soon as it touched the earth. Heavy hail showers have been falling all day, but doing little damage.

TARCOWIE, June 22.—Snow is falling, and the whole place for miles is a picture of white. It started at 6 o'clock this morning.

CHAIN OF PONDS, June 22.—During last night and this morning there have been some heavy falls of snow, many of the hills being covered, and presenting a most pic- turesque appearance.

MEADOWS SOUTH, June 22.—A heavy fall of snow occurred here during last night, the landscape being covered with a beautiful mantle of white, which was visible on the hills for two or three hours after day broke. Several heavy showers have since fallen, and owing to the amount of water about the snow soon disappeared

MOUNT BARKER, June 22.—Snow fell here to-day.

BULL'S CREEK, June 22.—This morning snow was thick on the ranges.

ORROROO, June 22.—It is bitterly cold. Snow fell this morning for about an hour, and the hills all round were clothed In white.

SEVENHILLS, June 22.—After the recent cold weather it was not surprising to see the ground covered with snow at day break this morning. It lasted until about 9 o'clock, and then fell again at intervals until noon, but it made no further impression on the ground. The snow was accompanied by heavy rain and some hail. It is still cold, with every indication of more snow.

YONGALA, June 22.—The residents of the town and district this morning were astonished to find that the ground was covered with snow, which began to fall about 2 o'clock, and continued till 7.30 a.m. On an average the depth was fully 3 in. The streets were soon alive with snowballers and photographers, who endeavored to make the best of a rare sight, many fine snapshots being obtained. The rain registered was 50 points, of which about 40 were represented by melted snow. About 10 o'clock a good quantity had melted, which formed large streams, and flooded the streets. The appearance of the weather promises further falls, so that a bountiful season seems assured.

GEORGETOWN, June 22—The residents of Georgetown were surprised to find that during the night there had been a heavy fall of snow. The surrounding country was entirely covered, the hills presenting a beautiful appearance. Snowballing, an unusual thing in the north, caused great amusement among the younger members of the population.

MOUNT BRYAN. June 22.—On Sunday about 9.30 p.m. snow commenced to fall, and it continued during the night. The country presents a beautiful sight.

MONARTO SOUTH, June 22.—The much-needed rain has come at last. Since 6 p.m. on Saturday an intermittent rain has fallen which will do the crops much good and set the farmers fallowing. Not withstanding several weeks of comparatively rainless though boisterous weather, the crops are in a flourishing condition. A peculiar feature of the season is the absence of the usual heavy rains which flood the creeks and fill the dams. Mr. R. Hartmann has just completed a very large dam, which when filled will provide a big supply of water for himself and his neighbors.

SHERINGA, June 19.—Good rains have again fallen throughout the week, being ac- companied by heavy hailstorms. Lambing is general, and the squatters anticipate a fair percentage.

GRUNTHAL, June 22.—During the last few days rain has fallen almost continuously. On Sunday last the Onkaparinga Rivcr came down a banker. Trees of no small size were torn out by the roots and hurled down the stream. Occasionally a rabbit was to be seen vainly struggling to get out of the water. No serious damage was done by the floodwaters. In a large paddock immediately in front of the local hotel a lake of considerable dimensions has been created during the past few days. In this paddock stock are running and the owner is entertaining considerable anxiety concerning their safety. This lake generally forms every winter. Today several falls of snow have been experienced. The falls, however, were not heavy; in fact, it was hardly more than sleet. The hills around Murdoch's Hill, six miles distant, are now covered with a heavy fall of snow.

TUNGKILLO June 22.—A fall of snow was witnessed here today, and at 11 o'clock the ground was covered to a depth of from 3 to 5 in. Some large snowballs were made, and young and old engaged in snowball throwing.

EDEN VALLEY, June 22. — A snow-storm was witnessed here today. The fall began at 7.30 a.m. and continued till 10 o'clock without intermission, the depth of snow on the main road being over 2 in. Several lighter falls occurred during the day. The South Rhine River is running strongly, also the creeks in and about here. The cold weather is severe on the stock.

GUMERACHA, June 22. — All the low-lying country is covered with water. Farmers will be unable to get on the land for some days. Snow fell all this morning, but melted as soon as it touched the ground.

ECHUNGA, June 22. — For the past five days heavy rains, accompanied by hail, have fallen. All tilling operationns are at a standstill for the present, as low-lying land has been covered with water. Snow fell at intervals to-day.

JAMESTOWN, June 22. — The residents of this town on Monday morning had a lovely view on rising from their slumber, for during the early hours a record fall of snow had taken place. In the town the fall was about 3 in. deep, while at Canowie, Mount Lock, and Bundaleer the fall was reckoned to be fully a foot deep. Snowballing was indulged, in. At the district council office there were six large balls heaped upon one another, standing folly 6 ft. high. Rain set in during the day, and most of the snow soon disappeared.

YARCOWIE, June 22.— Yesterday was very cold and stormy. Snow began to fall at night, and, continued till early morning. The snow covered the ground to a depth of about 5 in. A few indulged in snowballing.

MARRABEL, June 22.—Since Saturday the weather has been exceptionally cold and wet. Snow fell last night, and the residents had the pleasure of witnessing a heavy fall about midday to-day. Snow fell thickly for about half an hour.

HALLETT, June 22.—A fine fall of snow, about 6 in., was experienced here last night. It was the heaviest known by the oldest residents of the district. There were two or three heavy falls, during the day, and it is still snowing (8.30 p.m.). The hills and gullies are a pretty sight. It will be bad for the stock, and especially for the lambs, as a great number will perish. The sparrows and small birds are lying around the houses dead.

MELROSE, June 22.—After the heavy hail squalls of Sunday evening, and the piercing cold of the atmosphere, residents of Melrose were not surprised to see the top of Mount Remarkable crowned with snow this morning. The fall had been so heavy that the gullies and slopes for hundreds of feet down were covered with the white mass. The weather continues so extremely cold that it is probable there will be another fall this evening.

MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 22.—The snow is a dazzling sight to-day, there being a complete mantle of white everywhere. There were heavy falls all night and this morning, and cattle, horses, and sheep are travelling about trying to find dry places to feed upon. The snow remained on the flats all day long, and will be seen on the ranges of Mount Bryan for several weeks, as it lies 6 and 7 ft. deep. During the storm native birds sought protection under verandahs.

WOODCHESTER, June 23.—A splendid rain set in here on Saturday night. Up till noon on Monday 1¾ in. had been recorded. This fall was most acceptable, as owing to the dryness many farmers had to suspend fallowing operations. The early-sown crops are making rapid headway, and feed is plentiful."

"Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88382861
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8506962
APA citation
IN THE COUNTRY. (1908, June 27). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 42. Retrieved June 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88382861"

I posted this comment with the article on Trove:

"I've corrected the electronic version to a pretty high level of accuracy. There will still be a few spelling errors, and if you copy and paste the text you'll find a lot of redundant spaces but it doesn't take long to remove them from the pasted text. If you wish to publish the corrected text I recommend doing your own check against the original image of the newspaper text first. It's definitely not proofed to the level required for published histories or scientific papers. There's nothing like another person proofing corrected text to find more errors! The reason I spent a guesstimated seven hours correcting this article is that it records what is clearly one of the biggest snowfalls in South Australia's recorded history and is of considerable value to historians, weather enthusiasts and meteorologists and the general public.
Cheers - Miles 12th June 2013"

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#1198751 - 13/06/2013 05:02 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: ----]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
Originally Posted By: -hillsrain-
Unstable I am hoping with your extensive research that you can find some mention of snow falls around meadows. Particularly the hills to the south of the town moreso than spots like green hill or Echunga or even Macclesfield. I have been unable to find anything.
We have had wet sleet here numerous times but I have never seen or even had reports of snowfall on the ground here.


In the above article there are two relevant reports:

"MEADOWS SOUTH, June 22.—A heavy fall of snow occurred here during last night, the landscape being covered with a beautiful mantle of white, which was visible on the hills for two or three hours after day broke. Several heavy showers have since fallen, and owing to the amount of water about the snow soon disappeared"

"BULL'S CREEK, June 22.—This morning snow was thick on the ranges."

I'm inclined to think these two reports can be taken more or less at face value, unless they simply dreamed it up to get onto the bandwagon, or they'd been eating magic mushrooms smile


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#1200054 - 21/06/2013 05:38 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
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Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
More on the 1908 June 21st-22nd snow event.

Source: Trove at http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56868421

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 23 June 1908 Page 5

This is an article from The Register on the snowfall of June 21st-22nd 1908. I've corrected the Trove electronic copy and posted the entire article here because this is one of the biggest snow events in SA's recorded history. At the beginning of this article there is an eyewitness account of a train journey in the Mid-North during the snowfall.

I went through the electronic text twice on Trove making corrections (by comparing it to their image of the article from an actual newspaper of the day). Twice is not sufficient to remove all errors but it removes all but a few scattered errors. Anyone wanting to use this text below for a history or some other similar published document will need to do further careful checking on Trove. But my corrected version would be suitable I think for publishing on the internet in situations where a few mostly very minor errors don't matter.

"SNOW IN THE NORTH.

TRAIN DELAYED.

Passengers who travelled by the Broken Hill express which arrived in Adelaide on Monday morning had an exhilarating experience. Mr. Coombe. M.P., who travel-
led from the Silver City, states:—"When we emerged from the narrow gauge train at Terowie after an extremely cold night we found snow an inch deep on the railway platform, and the feathery flakes were still falling. Two youths who had walked a mile or two to the station had their hats and shoulders well capped with the snowy down, and railway employes were similarly adorned. The fields on either side of the line were carpeted with white, which glimmered faintly in the dim moonlight. At Yarcowie, the next station, the train was pulled up outside the home signal, and had to wait two or three minutes. The explanation was that a snowdrift extended from a pile of sleepers across the line and covered the points. The porter would not let the train in until he had shovelled the deposit from the rails and seen that the points were right. At Uloolo, Hallett, and Mount Bryan, high-level stations, the snow was two inches deep on the flat platforms, while there were deposits feet deep in favorable situations. As the dawn appeared the sight was magnificent. The foliage of trees was beautifulv tipped with snow on the leeward side. Creepers and pot plants in front of houses were converted into curtains of white. Stables, haystacks, wood heaps, &c were similarly adorned. Sheep herded together, and presented fleeces whiter than their own native coats. The engine's cow-catcher and wheels gathered a considerable accumulation of the crystal substance, and the roofs of carriages were similarly whitened. The fields were thickly coated, and the hills in the distance fairly glistened. Snow continued to fall until Hallett was reached. The name boards at Hallett and Mount Bryan were literally plastered with snow and unreadable. Snow-balling was indulged in at several of the stations. Burra was within the snow zone, but the deposit was not so pronounced, while Farrell's Flat was on the extreme edge of the storm area." Mr. M. Eyres, the driver of the express, says that this is the fifth snowstorm he has experienced on the railway lines in South Australia during the last 26 years, and the present visitation he regards as the most severe since one which came along 24 years ago. In the old country he had an adventure of a sensational character. He was snowed up for three days and three nights on a pilot engine, and had to be dug out by a snow plough.

AUBURN, June 22.—Snow and hail fell at about half-past 1. A little snow-balling was indulged in.

BRlNKWORTH, June 22.— Snow fell to the eastward in the hills yesterday.

BURRA. June 22.— This morning at daylight the landscape presented a pretty ap-pearance in a mantle of snow. The Burra hills presented the appearance of huge icebergs. A portion of the morning was taken up in snowballing.

CALTOWIE, June 22.— There was a fine fall of snow last night, and a beautiful spectacle was presented this morning. The Mount Lock, Neva Neva, and Bundaleer Ranges are now heavily capped, while the adjoining gullies are several feet deep in drift snow.

COWELL, June 22.—Very heavy rain fell last night and this morning. The prospects for a good year are exceedingly bright.

EUDUNDA, June 22.—Shortly after 9 o'clock this morning snowflakes commenced to fall, and they fell for about half an hour. The sight while it lasted was a pretty one.

GEORGETOWN, June 22—Last night a heavy fall of hail occurred. This morning the scene was a pretty one. The whole plain was covered; in many places was some inches in depth.

HALLETT, June 22.— There was a heavy fall of snow last night. The ground was covered 6 in. everywhere, and in places the snow drifted to a depth of several feet. It is the heaviest fall experienced here. Branches of trees were broken off.

JAMESTOWN. June 22.— This morning as far as the eye can see the whole place is covered with snow. The fall has been a heavy one. The Bundaleer Ranges and other adjacent hills are enveloped in a beautiful white mantle. The trees in the Bundaleer Forest and the parks adjacent to the town had a pretty appearance. House tops and all building roofs were covered, and the streets had a thick coating over them. All classes of the community engaged in snowballing, and business for the time being was suspended.

LOBETHAL. June 22.—Snow began to fall early this morning, and continued all day at intervals. The hills presented a pretty picture. Snowballing was taken up by the young folk.

MEADOWS SOUTH. June 22—We have had a fall of snow last night, and this morning the hills were covered. Throughout the morning, snow has fallen, but owing to the heavy rain it melted quickly, except in sheltered places. MOUNT BARKER. June 22.—A little snow has fallen to-day.

MOUNT PLEASANT, June. 22.— There was a three hours' fall of snow this morning. All the surrounding country is white. It is the heaviest fall since 1901.

MANNANARIE, June 22.—Snow began to fall this morning about 6 o'clock, and continued for about two hours, when the country presented a beautiful appearance.

MOUNT TORRENS, June 22.—This morning there was a change in events, and snow began to fall. It was first noticed at about a quarter past 7, and continued until 11 o'clock, when the sun began to shine, and the snow melted. The country all around for miles was one sheet of white. and the snow lay fully 2 in. thick upon the ground. Outdoor work was abandoned, and snowballing took its place.

MANOORA. June 22.—The residents have been somewhat compensated for the severe cold by witnessing several light falls of snow.

OODLA WIRRA. June 21—An inch of snow fell during the night, and transformed the whole place into a wonderfully white world, tranrformed as though Hans Andersen's fairy folk had been at work.

ORROROO. June 22.—This morning when the mist cleared away the hills around the town were seen to be covered with snow. As the sun shone out these snow-clad hills in the distance afforded a beautiful sight.

PETERSBURG. June 22.— The heaviest fall of snow recorded here occurred last night, and continued this morning. The ground is, at 11 a.m., covered as far as the eye can reach with a thick carpet of white, in places over a foot deep, while even in the most exposed and level places it is never less than 3 to 4 in. in depth. Some of the young thick-foliaged trees, the limbs of which were already brittle by reason of the intense cold experienced lately. have had their branches broken by the weight of snow. Snowballing is general, and the making of snowmen is responsible for the absence of many children from school. Trade is almost at a standstill and even the most staid business men are out laying in a stock of colds and chilblains. The snowballers have no respect for age or sex, and those who show that they do not appreciate the attentions of the merry-makers get rather a bad time.

ROSEWORTHY, June 22.— Snow was plainly visible on the Barossa Ranges until 12 o'clock to-day. It is a distance of 12 miles from here.

SEVENHILLS. June 22.— At daybreak the country presented a lovely appearance, covered with a mantle of snow, which had not completely melted until 9 o'clock. Al-though snow fell at intervals until midday it was not sufficiently heavy to be seen on the ground.

SOUTH ROAD. June 21.—The heavy rains which fell on Saturday and Sunday caused a big flood in the Sturt and neighbouring creeks. At Morphettville the flood was awash with the railway line, and spread over the Morphettvile road and parts of the Bay road. This necessitated the embankments of the line being watched throughout the day. Low-lying lands are submerged.

TEROWIE. June 22.— Residents here wcre not surpriseded this morning to find the ground covered with a thick carpet of snow. The hills, trees, and fences presented a pretty sight. The fall does not appear to be as deep as the previous one. but the snow is remaining longer on the ground.

TANUNDA, June 22.—Heavy rain fell yesterday all day, consequently the rivers and the lowlying grounds are flooded. It was bitterly cold this morning, and the Barossa Ranges were covered with a beautiful white sheet of snow.

URAIDLA. June 22.— This morning we had an exceptionally heavy snowstorm for about three hours. It is a record snowstorm for this district for many years.

WHYTE-YARCOWIE. June 22.— A heavy full of snow occurred last night, and has continued during today till noon. The hills and surroundings are snowclad.

YACKA, June 22.— This morning the hills a few miles east of the township were capped with snow. One range known as Mount Watts was practically covered, and afforded a splendid sight.

YONGALA. June 22.—Snow fell during the night, and the ground is covered to a depth of about 3 in. {end of article}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868421
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4436748
APA citation
SNOW IN THE NORTH. (1908, June 23). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved June 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868421

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#1200061 - 21/06/2013 08:19 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
Here are two photos, in the State Library of South Australia, of snow in Peterborough (Mid-North of SA) dated 23rd June 1908 which I presume were taken on 22nd June. One hundred and three years ago, almost to the day smile




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#1200066 - 21/06/2013 08:59 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
paisley Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 27/11/2001
Posts: 1121
Loc: Magill campus Uni SA (w) & Fir...
What a shame we dont have decent synoptic charts for these early events.

I think we should be hunting down all the relevant charts since the introduction of frontal type analysis (late 40s?) to match to the reported events.

I assume the BoM has archives for sea level charts going way back?

P

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#1200235 - 22/06/2013 07:09 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
I think The Advertiser published a daily weather map and other weather information Monday to Saturday for a long time. I found this one for June 20th 1908 on Trove http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/5152941 Probably not enough info there and not detailed or accurate enough to give a good indication of why it snowed.

Combining my memory and a brief search on Google and Trove, the Bureau of Meteorology published a printed journal called the monthly weather review or some similar name, for South Australia for a long time, possibly from 1900 to quite recently. I remember consulting bound volumes of this journal occasionally in the Barr Smith Library at the University of Adelaide. If I remember correctly it included daily surface weather maps. I don't know if any of it is online - maybe not.

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#1200361 - 22/06/2013 18:12 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
kgb007 Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/12/2010
Posts: 1511
Loc: Hope Valley, SA
Basically in the ol' days they would have had to take all the barometric readings from observers in the field! Join the dots of similar readings to produce the barometric chart, and I'm sure there weren't many telephones back in those day! Would have been sent by telegraph!

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#1200408 - 22/06/2013 21:14 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
teckert Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 27/05/2001
Posts: 17498
Loc: NE suburbs, Adelaide, South Au...
Unstable, the BOM still put out a monthly review with daily MSLP maps... can't for the life of me find it atm though, but I know I've seen it this year still...

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#1200425 - 22/06/2013 22:08 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Newbury1 Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 20/11/2008
Posts: 14
Loc: Blackwood
Wrong state I know but does anyone here remember the June 23 snowfall in 1983? It may have affected SA too. I was living in St Arnaud at the time and recall that the snow was not forecast, but the town ended up with about 20cm of snow, which was the heaviest fall of the century. The snow blanketed much of the Wimmera and North Central regions and from memory it cam with a light north westerly breeze. The northern slopes therefore had much more snow than the southern, which was quite unusual. I seem to recall BOM saying that it was something to do with a cold upper pool and perhaps a decaying cold front that produced the snow. It goes to show that not all snowfalls are produced by a strong cold front with strong southwesterly winds and a long fetch.
I am wondering if the current unusual synoptic pattern may produce something similar

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#1200429 - 22/06/2013 22:21 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: teckert]
teckert Offline
Weatherzone Moderator

Registered: 27/05/2001
Posts: 17498
Loc: NE suburbs, Adelaide, South Au...
Originally Posted By: teckert
Unstable, the BOM still put out a monthly review with daily MSLP maps... can't for the life of me find it atm though, but I know I've seen it this year still...


Found it... http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/mwr/

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#1200469 - 23/06/2013 04:48 Re: Snow in South Australia [Re: Unstable]
Unstable Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 09/01/2007
Posts: 3585
Loc: Adelaide
That's interesting Newbury1 smile I don't recall a June 23rd snowfall in 1983 but I may have been preoccupied with other things at the time. I do recall that in 1983 one of the driest periods = biggest droughts on record in much of South Australia came to an end in late summer or autumn. Parts of the Murray Mallee looked like the Sahara Desert before the rains came. So far Trove has only published dignitised newspapers up to 1954 (which fortunately includes the 1951 snowfalls which might be the single biggest snow event in SA since records began) so there's no online 1983 newspapers to search. I'll keep it in mind though - might be a record of the snow event somewhere online. Re "I am wondering if the current unusual synoptic pattern may produce something similar" - I'm keeping an eye on temperatures here in SA tonight - so far the coldest aws temp is 5.1 degrees on Lofty. I think snow can theoretically fall to the ground at that temp if the air is very dry but the relative humidity up there at last aws reading was 100%.
Re "Found it... http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/mwr/ " yes it seems that is an online continuation of their printed monthly weather reviews going back perhaps to 1900. We can hope that BOM or perhaps Trove will eventually digitise their printed reviews.

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