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#138139 - 07/10/2003 08:37 Australian Slang
tony m Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 11/05/2003
Posts: 315
Loc: Menai(Sydney) Lat.-34.0233S; L...
A overseas guest was asking about the Australian Slang(Aussie slang). As we most all know Australia has it's own way of the English language. I suppose it has developed over the last 200 years.

I used to have a book with all the Aussie Slang words but lent it out to a "mate" and he never threw back the "boomerang" (never returned it)

There are many varieties or the Australian Language and many of the old words such as "you silly drongo" meaning a silly or slow witted person; which slang words like this you do not hear as much now.
The real meaning of drongo is a songbird that eats insects.

As we all now that " mate" is still used and very often all over Australia. Meaning a friend or even a stranger who you meet for the first time. esp. "blokes" (men). But a real Aussie mate will never let you down and will always help you in time of trouble or will lend you a "quid" meaning money.

There are thousands Aussie Slang synonyms; some are harmless, some irreverence, some are even coarse or vulgar meanings, but that is how are a lot of Australians are, with tounge in cheek expressions going back from our "convict days" and "mother England" 200 years ago.

I am starting the forum now; " send her down huey" ( asking the Good Man upstairs for the rain)

Tell us all your Aussie Slang.

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#138140 - 07/10/2003 09:17 Re: Australian Slang
Cloudmaster_dup1 Offline
Weather Nerd

Registered: 15/10/2001
Posts: 5100
Loc: Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, NSW...
The all time classic for mine is "youse". Instead of saying "Here you all are", some people say "Here youse are". I never knew it was an offical english word ( youse wink ), but it just sounds so wrong, and similar to "slang communication". :nerd:

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#138141 - 07/10/2003 09:30 Re: Australian Slang
Matt Pearce Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 26/01/2001
Posts: 4402
Loc: Kariong, NSW
The way everything ends up with an "-o" on the end...when we first came here, we couldn't believe how every single word seemed to end up as something-o

eg ambo, servo, arvo, bottleo, even words that become longer when you add the o on the end!

But I've picked up most of them now...

Matt

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#138142 - 07/10/2003 09:47 Re: Australian Slang
Andrew Miskelly Offline
Weatherzone Webmaster

Registered: 15/11/2001
Posts: 3149
Loc: Mittagong, NSW
I like a bit of obscurity in my humour so I've always been a fan of Rhyming Slang but I think it's origins might be English.

e.g. Butcher's Hook = Look; Joe Blake = Snake, but there are Aussie variants like Barry Crocker = Shocker etc.

Of course it was always going to be the case that people would get lazy and actually drop the part of the phrase that rhymed making it even more obscure. e.g. Get a butcher's at this, he's had a barry!

Andrew.

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#138143 - 07/10/2003 10:54 Re: Australian Slang
gustfront Offline
Thundergod

Registered: 19/05/2001
Posts: 3393
Loc: North Balgowlah, Sydney, 33.79...
Andrew
I'm pretty sure that rhyming slang has pommy origins. I saw it mentioned on a TV show a few years back that it was theorised that crims used rhyming slang to disguise their conversations in pubs and continually adapted it to keep ahead of the coppers. Since many of the crims ended up here it's no surprise it formed a basis for a lot of aussie slang.

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#138144 - 07/10/2003 11:48 Re: Australian Slang
tony m Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 11/05/2003
Posts: 315
Loc: Menai(Sydney) Lat.-34.0233S; L...
Keep it coming fella's(the Aussie Slang laugh

The word you use or the phrase; try to give the "interpretation" next to it with the plain English language so that our new overseas(Bavaria Germany) member on the weather zone forums will know what we are talking about. (Sandro: General weather; two topics: Rain at last, and Bavarian weather)

Stone the Crows(I am not sure of the real meaning)

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#138145 - 07/10/2003 13:06 Re: Australian Slang
Overshoot Offline
Member

Registered: 19/08/2001
Posts: 2158
Loc: Wahroonga, North Shore, Sydney
Quote:
Originally posted by Cloudmaster:
The all time classic for mine is "youse". Instead of saying "Here you all are", some people say "Here youse are". I never knew it was an offical english word ( youse wink ), but it just sounds so wrong, and similar to "slang communication". :nerd:
Oh dear that is SOO WESTIE. As soon as I hear someone say 'youse' I think 'westie'.

"What are youuuse doing?"
"goin' down to the R-ie"

and so on.

We are all Australian, we know our own slang. :rolleyes:

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#138146 - 07/10/2003 13:13 Re: Australian Slang
Clownfish Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 21/01/2003
Posts: 63
Loc: Portarlington
The widespread use of slang in Australian English had its origins in the "flash" language of the primarily Cockney convicts. Indeed, the slang of the lower classes of London, where the majority of convicts originated, was so inscrutable as to require interpreters in court.

The use of semi-coded language to subvert authority possibly resonated with the ideal of Australian egalitarianism, and so may have become more generally admired and emulated in the colony than it was in the more rigid social structure of England, where the use of such language would immediately class the speaker as being of unworthy status.

Love of wordplay and riddling talk is also a hallmark of the Anglo-Saxons, so maybe the Australian love of slang also has class resonances: The primarily lower-class of Anglo-Saxon origin versus the Norman upper class?

Interestingly, Australian English is in many ways a repository of otherwise archaic and regional English words: ie, gully, paddock, billy etc

The use of the word "Youse", incidentally, is a feature of Irish English.

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#138147 - 07/10/2003 15:48 Re: Australian Slang
W W Offline
Member

Registered: 09/01/2002
Posts: 1227
Loc: Cobar 31.50S, 145.83E, 243m ...
"Oh dear that is SOO WESTIE. As soon as I hear someone say 'youse' I think 'westie'."

"What are youuuse doing?"
"goin' down to the R-ie"

Excuse my ignorance but what does "SOO WESTIE" mean confused

Heather :cheers:

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#138148 - 07/10/2003 15:56 Re: Australian Slang
Cloudmaster_dup1 Offline
Weather Nerd

Registered: 15/10/2001
Posts: 5100
Loc: Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, NSW...
People from the 'west' who are usually classed as "hoons" or "rebellious". It's just a general phase that has gotten missed up with teens these days. wink

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#138149 - 07/10/2003 15:57 Re: Australian Slang
Jacob Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 17/09/2001
Posts: 6288
Loc: Sydney, NSW
I remember when living in the Kimberly everyone was 'bloke'.. even a shop assistant would say 'you right bloke'? laugh That was in the Kimberly cool days smile

Up here in Darwin, its more of an american thing happening, the fashion is all hip hop, etc etc, but some aboriginal slang is pretty well used.. such as 'gammon' which is like telling porkie pies (lies).. and everyone says 'tru brus'... or 'tru budda'... along with the ones I cant actually type.. like the clicking noises.. confused

Where someone will say "yeah I got a million dollars" (click noise here) "aaaaah gammon bro" (laugh here)..

Its hard to type, but I guess some people will know what I mean..

"Malaga" - homosexual (Arnhem Aboriginal)
"Buju" - Good looking Guy (Tiwi Islander Aboriginal)
"Darlukk" Good looking gal (Arnhem Aboriginal)
"Boonyang" idiot/fool (oo is the sound in foot)

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#138150 - 07/10/2003 16:27 Re: Australian Slang
Andrew Miskelly Offline
Weatherzone Webmaster

Registered: 15/11/2001
Posts: 3149
Loc: Mittagong, NSW
Quote:
Originally posted by Dry & Dusty:
Excuse my ignorance but what does [westie] mean?
'Westie' is a stereotype given to residents of the western suburbs of Sydney who tend to get around in VK commodores wearing ugh boots, trackie daks and flannos (flannelette shirts), drinking VB long-necks. It's preferable for a Westie to be blonde or red-head and sport a mullet that would have made the Jon Bon Jovi of the '80s look like he had a skin-head.

Andrew.

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#138151 - 07/10/2003 16:54 Re: Australian Slang
Gabby Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 23/03/2002
Posts: 2845
Loc: Yarrawonga/Mulwala on the Murr...
The days of the week
Mundy, Chewsdy, Wensdy, Thersdy, Fridy, Saddy, and Sundy.

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#138152 - 07/10/2003 17:14 Re: Australian Slang
Smitty Offline
Hydrologist

Registered: 23/05/2001
Posts: 2073
Loc: Melbourne City
Westie is not just sydney based its all over australia... the saying came about as the "workers" lived in the western suburbs whislt the more upper class people prefered to live in the eastern suburbs. This is becasue the upper class or "snobs" didnt want to drive to and from work with the sun in their eyes!

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#138153 - 07/10/2003 17:14 Re: Australian Slang
Overshoot Offline
Member

Registered: 19/08/2001
Posts: 2158
Loc: Wahroonga, North Shore, Sydney
Westie isn't a derogatory term either. The Victorian equivalent is a Bogan. "Youse" is a very country thing to say too. I went to Parkes for my cousin's 21st on the weekend, so many 'youse's' were said haha. I don't know why I notice that particular word and have such a strong reaction to it. I can't explain it! :p

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#138154 - 07/10/2003 17:19 Re: Australian Slang
W W Offline
Member

Registered: 09/01/2002
Posts: 1227
Loc: Cobar 31.50S, 145.83E, 243m ...
Thanks for the WESTIE interpretation
I guess I must be a westie as I live in the far west of NSW :p :p :p does that count wink

Heather :cheers:

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#138155 - 07/10/2003 19:29 Re: Australian Slang
seaweed Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 13/10/2001
Posts: 1556
Loc: Robina SEQ
I reckon that Steve Irwin is the only person these days that uses the word "drongo". Listening to him last night on "Enough Rope" was like a flashback to the days of Dad and Dave or Strop.
laugh

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#138156 - 07/10/2003 20:16 Re: Australian Slang
Cloudmaster_dup1 Offline
Weather Nerd

Registered: 15/10/2001
Posts: 5100
Loc: Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, NSW...
Quote:
Originally posted by Overshoot:
I don't know why I notice that particular word and have such a strong reaction to it. I can't explain it! :p
Neither. It's very irritating and shouldn't be part of the english language! :p

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#138157 - 07/10/2003 20:48 Re: Australian Slang
Habster Offline
Member

Registered: 30/04/2003
Posts: 250
Loc: Sydney
Oh come on, youse love it! :p

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#138158 - 07/10/2003 21:03 Re: Australian Slang
Cloudmaster_dup1 Offline
Weather Nerd

Registered: 15/10/2001
Posts: 5100
Loc: Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, NSW...
*Threatens to bring a knive to the next ASWA meeting* laugh

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