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#1212972 - 10/10/2013 00:36 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Farm Weather]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
Farm Weather any 'commercially' grown food is going to contain a range of different pesticides,(among a range of other chemicals) after all you can't grow food without pesticides right? smirk How many times would they have to spray lettuce? how many times would they have to spray spinach? to avoid all those nasty little bugs that eat holes on those sort of vegetables.

Now let's just use lettuce for example from that website http://www.whatsonmyfood.org/food.jsp?food=LT

It lists 51 different pesticides that have been used/found on Lettuces sampled some of them are (starting from the top of the list of the most commonly found on Lettuce)

Imidacloprid
DCPA
Dimethomorph
Permethrin cis
Permethrin trans
Acetamiprid
DDE p,p'
Methomyl
Diazinon
o-Phenylphenol
Cyhalothrin
Cyhalothrin
Dimethoate
Omethoate
Acephate
Endosulfan sulfate
Cypermethrin
Carbendazim

I have not even been right thru the list but out of the first 19 listed 18 of them are available in Australia...
It is funny though with all my 'farmer bashing' you fail to acknowledge my many posts that DO support farmers, and i am sure if i was doing the wrong thing in the treads the mods would be the first to let me know....
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Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

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#1212976 - 10/10/2013 07:02 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Farm Weather Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 10/11/2009
Posts: 845
Loc: West Mallee SA
so your still saying Australian farmers use all thoise pesticides?
do your due diligence yas
in the real world you would get you face litigation but its the internet a fantasy world
and above lettuce example a lot of that stuff isn't in Australia so are you suggesting we aussie farmers use illegal chemicals wonder were we get them from?
a question are you employed just wondering?
anyway sorry for intruding on your webpage


Edited by Farm Weather (10/10/2013 07:05)
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#1213072 - 10/10/2013 18:40 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
Petros Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 30/12/2002
Posts: 8071
Loc: Maffra, Central Gippsland, Vi...
Originally Posted By: @_Yasified_shak
Originally Posted By: Andy Double U
Originally Posted By: @_Yasified_shak
ROM was one of the posters who contributed mostly to these threads, however we all know he was banned


Bzzzzt, wrong and not for the first time. He along with several others that used to frequent these forums were temporarily banned, it's just thanks to some rather interesting decisions (read irregular) in regards to forum operation and moderation they've taken their bats and balls and have moved on.


As i said he was Banned

Hi Yasi - still flaming eh?

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#1213114 - 10/10/2013 23:10 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Farm Weather]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
Originally Posted By: Farm Weather
and above lettuce example a lot of that stuff isn't in Australia so are you suggesting

All of those chemicals that i have listed previously above are available in Australia

Originally Posted By: Farm Weather
we aussie farmers use illegal chemicals wonder were we get them from?


Farm Weather did i say that farmers were using illegal chemicals? You are manipulating my words, i did not say that, no,what i said was

Originally Posted By: @_Yasified_shak
19 listed 18 of them are available in Australia


If they are available it means that they are permitted for use(legally able to be used) for use in Australia,whether or not the are used is a different thing, as each food production sector has their own range of different chemicals that they would use for specific purposes.



And no i am not on the dole if that is what you are implying. smile
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

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#1213237 - 12/10/2013 09:21 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Farm Weather Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 10/11/2009
Posts: 845
Loc: West Mallee SA
Well have disagree about availability but feel free to put suppliers names up and I will make some enquiries
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#1213585 - 14/10/2013 16:27 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Andy Double U Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 28/10/2006
Posts: 1829
Loc: Mundoolun, SE QLD, 129m ASL

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#1214182 - 19/10/2013 00:29 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Farm Weather]
ColdFront Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 29/06/2008
Posts: 19046
Loc: The Beach.
Originally Posted By: Farm Weather
do your due diligence yas
in the real world you would get you face litigation


http://www.theland.com.au/news/agricultu...ls/2668611.aspx


...and I personally know a handful of farmers around Proserpine who still use a banned form of creosote. They are all aware of the risk of litigation too. Oh and that's in the real world.
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#1214189 - 19/10/2013 08:48 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Andy Double U Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 28/10/2006
Posts: 1829
Loc: Mundoolun, SE QLD, 129m ASL
Curious story. I think these guys are engaging in a bit of protectionism under the guise of concern for regulation and safety. In the context of that story, any pesticide that is used off-label, any pesticide that doesn't follow every single regulatory channel would be considered illegal. Now given the members of the board, this is not a surprising stance! The biggest issue with more regulation (as the story suggests) is that it prevents smaller players from entering the market and providing competition as well as further entrenching the positions of the bigger players that inevitably become fat, lazy and conceited which tends to leave end users in a position of making do with whatever is forced upon them.

Interesting list of board members don't you think CF? Yasi will have a fit!

President

Lachlan McKinnon, Nufarm Australia Limited

Vice President – Crop Protection

Damien Ryan, Sipcam Pacific Australia Pty Ltd

Vice President – Crop Biotechnology

Daniel Kruithoff, Monsanto Australia Limited

Treasurer

Dean Corbett, Accensi Pty Ltd

Members

Dr Jacqueline Applegate, Bayer CropScience Pty Ltd

Peter Dryden, Dow AgroSciences Australia Ltd

Scott Huf, DuPont (Australia) Ltd

Paul Luxton, Syngenta Crop Protection Pty Limited

David Peters, Farmoz Pty Ltd

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#1214194 - 19/10/2013 09:38 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Andy Double U]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
Originally Posted By: Double u
Interesting list of board members don't you think CF? Yasi will have a fit!


There are no surprises there uu chemi companies will always look after their best interest and will insert members onto different boars to 'influence' outcomes in their favor.

Just like all the different Monsanto employees (the Monsanto revolving door...)over the years that have ended up in varying positions in the White house, and then use their 'power' to influence decisions in favor of Monsanto...

Meanwhile some better news.....

Community Concerns Lead to Landmark Pesticide Protections in Kauai County
The Planting of Genetically Engineered Corn


(Beyond Pesticides, October 18, 2013) On October 10, a judge in Mexico issued an injunction against the planting and selling of genetically engineered (GE) corn seed, effective immediately, within the country’s borders. The decision comes nearly two years after the Mexican government temporarily rejected the expansion of GE corn testing, citing the need for more research. The decision prohibits agrichemical biotech companies, including Monsanto, DuPont Pioneer, Syngenta, PHI Mexico, and Dow AgroSciences, from planting or selling GE corn seed in Mexico, though imports of GE food will still be allowed.

This move follows the filing of a class action lawsuit on July 5 by farmers, beekeepers, environmentalists, and scientists, in total representing 53 citizens and 20 civil associations. “The action encompasses what we have been calling for over the past fifteen years: the protection of maize as the staple food of Mexicans and the preservation of our country, free of transgenic crops…” said Adelita San Vicente, representing seed interest group Fundación Semillas de Vida A.C.

The injunction was granted by Judge Jaime Eduardo Verdugo J. of the Twelfth District Court for Civil Matters of Mexico City, who cited “the risk of imminent harm to the environment” due to GE crops. The order requires Mexico’s Secretary of Agriculture (Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca, y Alimentación) and Secretary of the Environment (Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales) to immediately “suspend all activities involving the planting of transgenic corn in the country and end the granting of permission for experimental and pilot commercial plantings.”

According to Greenpeace Mexico, which has been heavily involved in the sustainable agriculture campaign and GE dialogue, the injunction is just the first step toward the definitive protection of the country’s biological diversity, and full recognition of Mexicans’ right to a healthy environment, safe food, and untainted corn as a cultural heritage.

The lawsuit is supported by scientific research, dating from 2001 and documenting the ongoing contamination of Mexico’s native corn varieties by transgenes from GE crops, including Monsanto’s Roundup ready varieties and the herbicide-resistant varieties marketed by DuPont Pioneer and Bayer CropScience.

With 53 percent of caloric intake and 22 percent of protein in the Mexican national diet coming from corn, the grain represents an important daily staple that is also inherently interwoven into the country’s cultural heritage. National campaigns, including “Sin Maiz, No Hay Paiz” (“Without Corn There is No Country”), have rallied against the introduction of GE corn into Mexico, raising debates about the need to safeguard national heritage, save native seeds, and protect environmental and human health.

The injunction against GE crops in Mexico is still a far cry from an outright ban. Further legal proceedings are now expected to follow, where all parties will enter into a legal arguments supported by experts who present supporting evidence for and against genetically modified corn. For the moment, the injunction prohibits the planting of GE seeds, allowing the plaintiffs time to gather support for their case.

In the U.S., there have been several injunctions against GE crops that have temporarily stopped their planting. For example, in 2007, a U.S. District judge filed an injunction against the planting or sale of GE alfalfa until the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) conducted a legally required Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Four years later, upon completing the EIS —which determined unregulated GE alfalfa would contaminate natural alfalfa, cause the loss of U.S. export markets, dramatically increase pesticide use, and drive the rise of Roundup-resistant superweeds— USDA announced plans to again deregulate GE alfalfa. In response, Beyond Pesticides along with other environmental and farming organizations filed a suit challenging the agency’s deregulation. In 2012, a U.S. District Judge in San Francisco ruled that USDA’s decision to deregulate GE alfalfa was not unlawful.

The explosion of GE crops on the market has led to growing pest and weed resistance, which has resulted in increased pesticide use. This treadmill threatens wildlife, particularly sensitive species. A 2012 study found the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate), which is sprayed on thousands of acres of Roundup Ready corn and soybeans, to induce morphological changes in three species of frogs. GE crop-induced herbicide applications are also indirectly affecting the health of beneficial species. Widespread applications of Roundup destroy sanctuary land and the plant species that support beneficial insects and other wildlife.

The best way to stop the planting of genetically engineered crops in the U.S. is to purchase foods that have the USDA certified organic seal. Under organic certification standards, genetically modified organisms and their byproducts are prohibited from food production. For more information on this issue, see Beyond Pesticides’ webpage on genetic engineering and see our related Daily News entries.

http://www.beyondpesticides.org/dailynewsblog/?p=12074
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


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#1214204 - 19/10/2013 10:49 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
The Monsanto revolving door....for larger more detailed image click on the link




http://www.whale.to/a/monsanto_revolving_door.html
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


Top
#1214531 - 22/10/2013 10:08 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
Argentines link health problems to farming chemicals

BASAVILBASO, Argentina (AP) — Argentine farmworker Fabian Tomasi wasn't trained to use protective gear as he pumped pesticides into crop dusters. Now at 47, he's a living skeleton.

Schoolteacher Andrea Druetta lives in a town where it's illegal to spray agrochemicals within 500 meters (550 yards) of homes, and yet soy is planted just 30 meters (33 yards) from her back door. Recently, her boys were showered in chemicals while swimming in their backyard pool.

Sofia Gatica's search for answers after losing her newborn to kidney failure led to Argentina's first criminal convictions for illegal spraying last year. But 80 percent of her neighbors' children surveyed carry pesticides in their blood.

American biotechnology has turned Argentina into the world's third-largest soy producer, but the chemicals powering the boom aren't confined to soy and cotton and corn fields. The Associated Press documented dozens of cases where these poisons are used in ways specifically banned by existing law.

Now doctors are warning that uncontrolled pesticide use could be the cause of growing health problems among the 12 million people who live in the South American nation's vast farm belt.

In Santa Fe province, the heart of Argentina's soy industry, cancer rates are two times to four times higher than the national average. In Chaco, the nation's poorest province, children became four times more likely to be born with devastating birth defects in the decade since biotechnology dramatically expanded industrial agriculture.

"The change in how agriculture is produced has brought, frankly, a change in the profile of diseases," says Dr. Medardo Avila Vazquez, a pediatrician who co-founded Doctors of Fumigated Towns. "We've gone from a pretty healthy population to one with a high rate of cancer, birth defects, and illnesses seldom seen before."

Once known for its grass-fed beef, Argentina has undergone a remarkable transformation since 1996, when the St. Louis-based Monsanto Company marketed a promising new model of higher crop yields and fewer pesticides through its patented seeds and chemicals.

Today, all of Argentina's soy and nearly all its corn, wheat and cotton are genetically modified. Soy farming tripled to 47 million acres (19 million hectares), and just like in the U.S., cattle are now fattened in feedlots on corn and soy.

But as weeds and insects became resistant, farmers increased the chemical burden ninefold, from 9 million gallons (34 million liters) in 1990 to more than 84 million gallons (317 million liters) today. Overall, Argentine farmers apply an estimated 4.3 pounds of agrochemical concentrate per acre, more than twice what U.S. farmers use, according to an AP analysis of government and pesticide industry data.

Monsanto's "Roundup" pesticides use glyphosate, one of the world's most widely applied and least toxic weed killers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and many others have declared it to be safe if applied properly. In May, the EPA even increased allowable glyphosate residues on foods.

Despite the wholesale adoption of Monsanto's model, safety rules vary.

Some of Argentina's 23 provinces ban spraying within 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) of populated areas; others say farmers can spray as close as 50 meters (55 yards). About one-third set no limits, and rule-breakers are very rarely punished.

A federal law requires toxic chemical applicators to suspend activities that threaten public health, "even when the link has not been scientifically proven," and "no matter the costs or consequences," but it has never been applied to farming, the Auditor General found last year.

In response to soaring complaints, President Cristina Fernandez ordered a commission in 2009 to study the impact of agrochemical spraying on human health. Its initial report called for "systematic controls over concentrations of herbicides and their compounds ... such as exhaustive laboratory and field studies involving formulations containing glyphosate as well as its interactions with other agrochemicals as they are actually used in our country."

But the commission hasn't met since 2010, the auditor general found.



Agriculture Secretary Lorenzo Basso said people are being misinformed.

"I've seen countless documents, surveys, videos, articles in the news and in universities, and really our citizens who read all this end up dizzy and confused," he said. "Our model as an exporting nation has been called into question. We need to defend our model."

In a written statement, Monsanto spokesman Thomas Helscher said the company "does not condone the misuse of pesticides or the violation of any pesticide law, regulation, or court ruling."

"Monsanto takes the stewardship of products seriously and we communicate regularly with our customers regarding proper use of our products," Helscher said.

Argentina was among the earliest adopters of the "no-till" method U.S. agribusinesses promoted. Instead of turning the topsoil, spraying pesticides, and then waiting until the poison dissipates before planting, farmers sow seeds and spray afterward without harming "Roundup Ready" crops genetically modified to tolerate specific poisons. Farmers can now harvest multiple crops each year on land that wasn't profitable before.

But pests quickly develop resistance to the same chemicals applied to identical crops on a vast scale, forcing farmers to mix in more toxic poisons, such as 2,4,D, used in "Agent Orange" to defoliate Vietnam's jungles. Some Argentine regulators called for labels warning that these mixtures should be limited to "farm areas far from homes and population centers," but they were ignored, the auditor found.

"Glyphosate is even less toxic than the repellent you put on your children's skin," said Pablo Vaquero, Monsanto's spokesman in Buenos Aires. "That said, there has to be a responsible and good use of these products, because in no way would you put repellent in the mouths of children and no environmental applicator should spray fields with a tractor or a crop-duster without taking into account the environmental conditions and threats that stem from the use of the product."

Out in the fields, Tomasi was routinely exposed.

"I prepared millions of liters of poison without any kind of protection, no gloves, masks or special clothing. I didn't know anything" he said.

Teachers in Entre Rios began to file police complaints this year. They said sprayers failed to respect 50-meter (55-yard) limits at 18 schools, dousing 11 during class.

In Santa Fe, Druetta also filed complaints, saying her students fainted when pesticides drifted into their classrooms and that her school lacks safe drinking water.

A house-to-house epidemiological study of 65,000 people in Santa Fe, led by Dr. Damian Verzenassi at the National University of Rosario, found cancer rates two times to four times higher than the national average, as well as thyroid disorders, respiratory illnesses and other afflictions seldom seen before.

"It could be linked to agrochemicals," Verzenassi said. "They do all sorts of analysis for toxicity of the first ingredient, but they have never studied the interactions between all the chemicals they're applying."

Hospital records show birth defects quadrupled in Chaco, from 19.1 per 10,000 to 85.3 per 10,000, in the decade after genetically modified crops were approved. A medical team then surveyed 2,051 people in six towns, finding more disease wherever people are surrounded by farms.

In the farming village of Avia Terai, 31 percent said a family member had cancer, compared with 3 percent in the ranching village of Charadai. They also documented children with malformed skulls, exposed spinal cords, blindness and deafness, neurological damage and strange skin problems.

It may be impossible to prove a specific chemical caused an individual's illness. But doctors increasingly are calling for broader, longer-term and more independent research, saying governments should make the industry prove that the accumulated agricultural burden isn't making people sick.

"That's why we do epidemiological studies for heart disease and smoking and all kinds of things," said Doug Gurian-Sherman, a former EPA regulator now with the Union of Concerned Scientists. "If you have the weight of evidence pointing to serious health problems, you don't wait until there's absolute proof in order to do something."
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world...micals/3094113/
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


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#1214759 - 23/10/2013 09:25 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
Huge GMO News

It hasn’t been a good week for Monsanto and the rest of the biotech industry.

Just three days ago, Mexico banned genetically engineered corn. Citing the risk of imminent harm to the environment, a Mexican judge ruled that, effective immediately, no genetically engineered corn can be planted in the country. This means that companies like Monsanto will no longer be allowed to plant or sell their corn within the country’s borders.

At the same time, the County Council for the island of Kauai passed a law that mandates farms to disclose pesticide use and the presence of genetically modified crops. The bill also requires a 500-foot buffer zone near medical facilities, schools and homes — among other locations.

And the big island of Hawaii County Council gave preliminary approval to a bill that prohibits open air cultivation, propagation, development or testing of genetically engineered crops or plants. The bill, which still needs further confirmation to become law, would also prohibit biotech companies from operating on the Big Island.

But perhaps the biggest bombshell of all is now unfolding in Washington state. The mail-in ballot state’s voters are already weighing in on Initiative 522, which would mandate the labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Knowing full well that 93 percent of the American public supports GMO labeling, and that if one state passes it, many others are likely to follow, entrenched agribusiness interests are pulling out all the stops to try to squelch yet another state labeling effort.


This time, however, things aren’t going quite as planned. On Wednesday, Washington state Attorney General Bob Feguson filed a lawsuit against the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA). The GMA, a lobby for the junk food industry, has been by far the largest donor to efforts to defeat the labeling initiative. The lawsuit alleged that the GMA illegally collected and spent more than $7 million while shielding the identity of its contributors.

The source of the money has now been exposed, and it turns out to be Pepsico, Coca-Cola, NestleUSA, General Mills and a few other junk food companies. The lawsuit revealed that GMA leadership held a series of secret meetings to plot how to perpetrate a money laundering scheme and illegally hide member donations from Washington state voters, in direct violation of campaign disclosure laws.

Unlike the junk food companies that feared consumer backlash, Monsanto hasn’t even bothered to hide the more than $4 million the company has given to the “no” campaign. In fact, GMA, Monsanto and a handful of other corporate donors have now broken a state record by pouring more than $17 million into their effort to stop Washington’s GMO labeling ballot initiative.

Voting is already underway in Washington, and the final ballots will be cast on November 5. The “yes” side is ahead in the most recent polls, but supporters of the right to know fear that a barrage of heavily funded and misleading ads could sour voters to the initiative.

They remember that just last year, California’s Proposition 37 was well ahead in the polls until Monsanto and its allies spent more than $46 million on their campaign in the Golden State.

All this label fighting and money laundering leads to some very significant questions. Why are Monsanto and the junk food industry willing to spend many tens of millions of dollars every year trying to keep you in the dark about your food? What doesn’t big food want you to know? And what are they afraid might happen if you did?

Monsanto tells us that their products are about the best thing to come along since sliced bread. For years they’ve been promising that GMOs would reduce pesticide use, increase yields, reduce water consumption, and offer foods that are more tasty and more nutritious.

I wish they were right.

But in the 20 years since GMO crops first came on the market, studies have found that they have led to higher pesticide use, and no meaningful improvement in flavor, nutrition, yield or water requirements. Instead, what they’ve created are plants that are engineered to withstand massive dosing of toxic herbicides, and plants that function as living pesticide factories. Monsanto’s Bt. corn, for example, is actually registered with the EPA as a pesticide.

With concern about GMOs growing fast, and with the public being pummeled with vast amounts of misinformation, there is a tremendous need for clear, accurate and reliable information about GMOs. In response, the 100,000+ member Food Revolution Network and the Institute for Responsible Technology are co-sponsoring a free online GMO Mini-Summit. From October 25-27, some of the top GMO experts on the planet will be providing insights and clear calls to action in this teleseminar that is also being broadcast without charge on the Internet. Monsanto probably isn’t too happy about the prospect of tens of thousands of people getting informed and mobilized. But if you love life, safe food, and the truth, then you might want to check it out.

And if you want to lend a hand to getting out the vote in the state of Washington, you can sign up to volunteer here.

Nobody knows what’s going to happen in Washington between now and November 5. But from Mexico, to Hawaii and to the 64 nations that already have GMO labeling, this tide just might be turning.

Maybe we, the people, do get a say in what we know, and what we eat, after all.

~~~~~

http://permaculturenews.org/2013/10/23/huge-gmo-news/
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


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#1215172 - 27/10/2013 07:23 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Farm Weather Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 10/11/2009
Posts: 845
Loc: West Mallee SA
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983455
I can cut and paste as well
anyway thought glypho caused cancer not cured it......
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#1215191 - 27/10/2013 12:41 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Farm Weather]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
That is good to hear, the internet is a wonderful tool and full of useful info like, did you know some of the big Biotech companies like Monsanto actually own Pharmaceutical companies? not a bad lurk hey? You pay good money for their chems to make you sick, then you pay more good money to buy their drugs to make you better!.... smirk

Besides cancer is not the only thing glyphosate has been linked to.
like...

http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/15/4/1416

http://www.cfp.ca/content/53/10/1704.short

http://www.naturalnews.com/glyphosate.html

http://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/b...cancer-and-more
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


Top
#1215193 - 27/10/2013 12:49 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
This is what they would lead you to believe....

Roundup: so safe you can drink it?

There is a widespread belief that Roundup® (active ingredient: glyphosate) is safe enough to drink. Indeed, my neighbor informs me of this every time he sees me pulling weeds in my garden.

The majority of GMOs are genetically modified to withstand direct application of herbicides. One of the most common is marketed as Roundup Ready®, engineered to withstand glyphosate. The result is that glyphosate residues are in our food. Just last summer the EPA raised the allowable levels of glyphosate in our food, in spite of receiving over 10,800 public comments against the proposed change. Whether or not it's safe enough to drink, we are certainly eating it.

Based on this 1947 video, drinking and eating pesticides seems to be one of Monsanto's favorite marketing tools. In the video, an entomologist is sent to an African village to try to convince them to spray DDT all over the village to kill the mosquitoes. But the Africans aren't buying it. The entomologist calls for a bowl of porridge, proceeds to spray DDT all over it and then eats a few bites. The Africans are still not buying it.

Why? Because they haven't been brainwashed into believing that scientists are the high priests with access to the truth. The truth is obvious: if it kills the mosquitoes, it can kill them too. And they were right.

Why are people so willing to give up common sense? The way to control people is through their belief system. If people have faith in science, then all that needs to be done is to own a bunch of scientists, put them in white coats, stand them up before the people and have them say what you want the people to believe.

The chemical companies have figured out that science is the religion of the day. They hire scientists and give money to educational institutions to fund research. They install their people in government positions and their scientists on the editorial boards of scientific publications and publish only the results they like while suppressing those they don't. Any scientist who dares to publish something different is hounded, belittled, and will likely lose her job, or at least her research funding. This is why the vast majority of scientists who are willing to speak out are either retired, or of retirement age. They have nothing to lose.

If you think Roundup® is safe, take a look at some other fine products brought to us by Monsanto: saccharine, PCBs, Agent Orange, DDT, Lasso, rGBH & rBST (synthetic bovine growth hormones), aspartame, 2,4,5-T (herbicide). At one time or another, we were assured that all of these were safe.

http://www.examiner.com/article/roundup-so-safe-you-can-drink-it



Wonder how long the guy in the video lived after doing that! or was he rushed straight to hospital to have his stomach pumped!
_________________________
Why is it in the era of "Time saving" devices, that people are more "Time poor" than ever?

Humans think they are the fabric of society,when they are merely part of the thread.


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#1215227 - 27/10/2013 18:50 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6050
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
While I am against the spraying of poisons unless there is no other options, I am not sure about DDT being one of the real baddies!

DDT is safe: just ask the professor who ate it for 40 years
Daily Telegraph ^ | originally: 07/19/2001 | Terence Kealey

Posted on Wednesday, 3 July 2002 8:39:24 PM by backhoe


Culture/Society Editorial Editorial
Source: The Telegraph (U.K.)
Published: 07/19/2001 Author: Terence Kealey
Posted on 07/18/2001 16:55:32 PDT by Pokey78


THE World Health Organisation, Greenpeace, the World Wildlife Fund, the UN environmental programme and its development programme, USAID, and almost all the other international representatives of the great and the good now campaign against DDT.

But, perversely, the Third World still uses it. To those who believe that America under George W Bush and his gas-guzzling, permafrost-drilling accomplices is the source of all global pollution, this Third World defection is disappointing. Where are the virtuous blacks when we need them?

DDT was introduced as an insecticide during the 1940s. In Churchill's words: "The excellent DDT powder has been found to yield astonishing results against insects of all kinds, from lice to mosquitoes."

And astonishing they were. DDT was particularly effective against the anopheles mosquito, which is the carrier of malaria, and people once hoped that DDT would eradicate malaria worldwide. Consider Sri Lanka. In 1946, it had three million cases, but the introduction of DDT reduced the numbers, by 1964, to only 29. In India, the numbers of malaria cases fell from 75 million to around 50,000.

But, in 1962, Rachel Carson published Silent Spring, the book that launched the environmental movement. In that book, Carson showed how DDT was imperilling wildlife, particularly predators at the top of the food chain that accumulated the chemical in their fat and in their thinning egg shells.

Within a decade, the developed countries had banned DDT, as did some developing countries, to the detriment of their health. In Sri Lanka, cases of malaria soon rose to 500,000. Worldwide, malaria has returned with a vengeance, accounting annually for 300 million cases and, sadly, one million deaths, mainly of children.

As the Third World now knows, there is no ready substitute for DDT. The spraying of houses with DDT prevents malaria because most people are infected after dusk as they sleep indoors. DDT permeates the walls of buildings, and a single spray will provide indoor protection for months.

Other chemicals are available, but they are generally less effective, shorter-acting and - most importantly for the Third World - more expensive. And DDT is extraordinarily safe for humans. Prof Kenneth Mellanby lectured on it for more than 40 years, and during each lecture he would eat a pinch.

Nor need DDT imperil wildlife. The destruction that Carson described was caused by the agricultural use of DDT as a mass insecticide in vast quantities on crops. But the discriminating application of DDT indoors involves only a tiny, contained, environmentally tolerable, reversible fraction of the dose. That is why some international health (as opposed to environmental) agencies, including Unicef, still support the judicious use of DTT. Even the WHO is now softening its stance.

Malaria was once endemic in Britain. Cromwell died of it and both Pepys and Shakespeare described it. Until the 1930s, it was still active in Essex. But we are lucky in our frosty climate, which kills anopheles, and we have eradicated the disease. Yet Greenpeace and other environmental agencies resist the appropriate use of DDT in the tropics.

Politics has long bedevilled malaria. Its first effective cure was quinine, which was discovered by Jesuit missionaries in South America during the 1630s, but for decades Protestants preferred to die rather than swallow "Jesuit's Powder". Today, Third World health is endangered by comfortable Western environmentalists, some of whom, discreetly, view black natives as threats to the local wildlife.

Supporting those black natives, however, are two researchers, Richard Tren and Roger Bate, whose Malaria and the DDT Story, recently published by the Institute for Economic Affairs in London, shows how to foster both a healthier and an environmentally friendlier Third World. Greenpeace, in its self-assurance, embodies a contemporary cultural imperialism as offensive as any Jesuit's.


•The author is the vice-chancellor of Buckingham University

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#1215228 - 27/10/2013 18:51 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
bd bucketingdown Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2008
Posts: 6050
Loc: Eastern A/Hills SA
See comments from many under the article
...interesting also!
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/710158/posts


Edited by bd bucketingdown (27/10/2013 18:51)

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#1215229 - 27/10/2013 18:55 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Petros Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 30/12/2002
Posts: 8071
Loc: Maffra, Central Gippsland, Vi...
.... Yasi your statement:

Why? Because they haven't been brainwashed into believing that scientists are the high priests with access to the truth. The truth is obvious: if it kills the mosquitoes, it can kill them too. And they were right.

... just dosent wash with your own strong belief in them when it comes to government sponsored climate scientists! smile

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#1215242 - 27/10/2013 20:15 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Petros]
@_Yasified_shak Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 07/03/2009
Posts: 4219
Loc: El Arish
DDT was banned in the '70's yet they still find traces of DDT in the breast milk of new mothers..
I can tell you i wouldn't be putting it on my porridge.
_________________________
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#1215268 - 28/10/2013 01:11 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
SBT Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 07/02/2007
Posts: 14286
Loc: Townsville Dry Tropics
DDT is still used in some countries such as Africa/PNG etc as it is a very effective insecticide that kills mosquitos and hence helps control malaria outbreaks.

As I pointed out to you last year it isn't the use of DDT that was the problem it was over use. We used to get the houses fogged with it in PNG on a weekly basis, Of course the fogging machine used water contaminated diesel as the vector to produce the smoke which was then mixed with DDT and a couple of other chemicals that knocked down ever gecko, spider, moth mosquito and grasshopper for miles around - I still got malaria but that was after I walked Kokoda and reckon it was from a mossie up in the highlands that bit me.
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