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#1481694 - 20/12/2018 02:10 Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not?
niinjaniin Offline
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Registered: 02/04/2017
Posts: 33
In South America, even at 500 or so kilometers away from the ocean, the climates are still lush. In Southern Africa at a similar distance from the ocean, the climates are either semi-arid or arid, yet the record highs are not that high. People elsewhere say it's the Great Dividing Range that's the reason why, but the people here don't think so. BTW, as one could see in the other thread, this is mostly research for an alternate Earth where North America is at similar latitudes and longitudes as Australia.


Edited by niinjaniin (20/12/2018 02:11)

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#1481746 - 20/12/2018 14:21 Re: Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not? [Re: niinjaniin]
niinjaniin Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 02/04/2017
Posts: 33
Correction: I just realized that 500 km in the east coast of Australia usually just means subtropical or semi-arid climates. I think I should replace 500 with 800 or 900.


Edited by niinjaniin (20/12/2018 14:25)

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#1482014 - 21/12/2018 14:31 Re: Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not? [Re: niinjaniin]
ozthunder Offline
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Registered: 23/09/2001
Posts: 3340
Loc: Mt Warrigal, NSW, Australia
Southern Africa = lots of elevated plateau - for example Johannesburg is at 1600m, most of Zimbabwe is >1000m. Botswana and Namibia are arid like Australia.

South America - can run that argument for Paraguay and maybe Southern inland Brazil, but gets rather dry in western Argentina. Look at Mendoza.

Topography plays a major role, and even the shape of Australia.
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#1482307 - 22/12/2018 17:18 Re: Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not? [Re: niinjaniin]
niinjaniin Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 02/04/2017
Posts: 33
Originally Posted By: niinjaniin
In South America, even at 500 or so kilometers away from the ocean, the climates are still lush. In Southern Africa at a similar distance from the ocean, the climates are either semi-arid or arid, yet the record highs are not that high. People elsewhere say it's the Great Dividing Range that's the reason why, but the people here don't think so. BTW, as one could see in the other thread, this is mostly research for an alternate Earth where North America is at similar latitudes and longitudes as Australia.
I'll cut straight to the point to the real question: would North America become that dry if I put it from the latitudes 5 degrees north to 40 degrees south?

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#1482549 - 24/12/2018 12:34 Re: Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not? [Re: niinjaniin]
ozthunder Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 23/09/2001
Posts: 3340
Loc: Mt Warrigal, NSW, Australia
North America is a complex setup and I can only guess at some of the answers. There is no Gulf of Mexico or Rocky Mountains in Australia, and Australia lacks landmass to its south. The Rocky Mountains and Gulf are vital in keeping the plains west of the Missisppi just outside semi desert, and in some periods that is not enough, such as the dust bowl years. The weather there is just so much more dynamic than here.
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Michael Thompson
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#1482892 - 28/12/2018 01:18 Re: Why is Australia dry at latitudes and distances from the sea where other continents are not? [Re: niinjaniin]
niinjaniin Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 02/04/2017
Posts: 33
For reference, here's how it would look like:


Edited by niinjaniin (28/12/2018 01:18)

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