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#1373693 - 22/04/2016 22:19 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
scott12 Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 10/11/2015
Posts: 1231
Loc: maadi Tully area
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#1427524 - 06/07/2017 11:31 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
LDRcycles Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 14/03/2017
Posts: 108
Loc: Kin Kin, Qld
Anyone happen to know if there are any smallcrop agents in Gympie still?

I grew up on a dairy farm but by 2007 deregulation had sent that industry to hell and we had to sell the herd. Half that block is now agisted to a neighbour's beef cows, and i've got ~70 head of beef goats on the remainder. The goats have been one hell of a learning curve, the biggest lesson being to know your market access. All the big processors are out west (Charleville, Bourke etc) and it took me 2 years to find someone local.

I'm now living on a 55 acre block on the other side of town from the old dairy, which is textbook perfect for small cropping. But obviously before i start digging i need to know the end product can be successfully turned into coin. My parents did some squash and zucchini way back, but the local pickup of produce ended in the 80s.

From what i can see the only options are local farmers markets or sending it down to Rocklea?

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#1474298 - 21/10/2018 00:52 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
Fowell Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 24/02/2018
Posts: 7
Loc: Australia
Climate change can upset sustenance accessibility, lessen access to food, and influence food quality. For instance, anticipated increments in temperatures, changes in precipitation designs, changes in outrageous climate occasions, and the decrease in water accessibility may all outcome in diminished rural profitability.

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#1478152 - 02/12/2018 16:47 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
amphetamarine Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 18/03/2004
Posts: 363
Loc: Cairns
Adaption is the best way to deal with conditions. The hardiest species survive the weaker die or adapt.

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#1486565 - 24/01/2019 12:24 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: ROM]
Wasser Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 24/01/2019
Posts: 3
You are quite right,"Agricultural" does seem to be a bit of a backwater compared to the other forums. Everybody seems to be really excited about the potential to break some heat records in South Australia today while all I can see is plants shriveling up in an environment that is very much like a blast furnace. My neighbour's bees are struggling to reduce the temperature in their hives and the long-term consequences for pollination of major agricultural crops and food security will be dire if there is a further decline in bee populations.
Planning ahead for the future is hard and BOM does not give a lot of guidance. Climatologist Darren Ray predicted a "mild December", "no extreme heat" and January was supposed to be "relatively mild", "a few days in the mid-thirties". At the moment, Adelaide is OVER 5 degrees ABOVE NORMAL. How can the BOM be so wrong??? Can we really trust the seasonal outlooks or are they just pure guesswork backed up by the latest technology?

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#1494168 - 13/03/2019 21:47 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: @_Yasified_shak]
mianfei Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 13/03/2019
Posts: 4
China is buying Australian farmland because we have the largest comparative advantage in agriculture for a very simple reason: Australia has a ratio of arable land to population four times that of any other country in the world.

The paradox is that, whilst we have the largest comparative advantage in agriculture, Australian soils are so ancient and Australian river runoff so limited and variable that the country stands as by far the most unsustainable for agriculture, full stop.

The effects of land clearing on the global climate as well as on Australia’s ancient and irreplaceable biodiversity are simply not factored into the cost of farming. Land is so, so cheap vis-à-vis land anywhere else in the world that there is no incentive to maintain it in reasonable health. It stands more efficient economically to clear new land if older land deteriorates or the incomparably better land of Europe, East Asia, North America and Andean South America becomes too expensive for viable agriculture.

The only real solution is for the government to buy back unviable properties and return them wholly to native flora as national parks. Such a move was proposed by ecologist Tyrone Thomas in his My Environmental Exposé two decades ago, but the government has been so sceptical the realities of man-made species extinction and climate change that it has done nothing except encourage more land clearing.

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#1494171 - 13/03/2019 22:41 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
bundybear Offline
Weatherzone Addict

Registered: 28/12/2010
Posts: 2366
Loc: Between Bundy and Gladstone
Another twat. Probably university educated. Furthest bush they have been is the Sydney Botanical gardens. No idea where their food comes from apart from the local supermarket or vegan café.

I wonder how long they think the country will survive when they shut down all industry and agriculture? Where are they protesting the constant conversion of good farming land into their bigger cities policies.

National parks are nothing but breeding grounds for vermin and weeds.

I will give them the credit they think they deserve when they pull their heads out of their backsides and are living green themselves. This means no minerals, no new fridge, no latest mobile phone, no electric car, living in a tent made from hemp (surely they wouldn't use steel in the construction of their house and certainly wouldn't have a tree cut down).

When they are growing all their own food. Walking everywhere in hemp shoes (can't have cattle for leather can we). All other transport uses earths rescources.

Farmers are the biggest greenies we have. Without their land care we don't have land. Or food.

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#1494750 - 16/03/2019 10:50 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
mianfei Offline
Cloud Gazer

Registered: 13/03/2019
Posts: 4
The problem with what you are saying, ‘bundybear’ is twofold.

The first problem is that – to an extent only recently understood but nonetheless profound – Australian soils and landscapes are so profoundly different from other Quaternary landmasses that methods of husbandry that constitute conservation in other continents do not (at least necessarily) constitute conservation here.

Most critically, Australian soils are a wholly non-renewable resource, because the last significant soil renewal occurred during the Carboniferous, 300,000,000 years ago. For an illustration that is 75,000,000 years before the first dinosaurs. In most Quaternary continents, soils are a renewable resource replenished via uplift and erosion of high mountains. Even Africa and “Guianan” South America are much less unfortunate than Australia because:
  • they lie close to the eutrophic Benguela and Canary Currents, which provide deep sea nutrients to land
  • they lie in the westward flow of the Saharan dust plume via the Trade Winds, whereas dust flows from Australia are small and highly oligotrophic
  • they gain nutrients from aerial ash fallout from oceanic islands of the Caribbean and Cameroon Volcanic Line, whereas all oceanic islands near to Australia lie northwards and do not direct aerial ash onto Australia

The second problem is that Australia has, by a rough estimate based upon FAO maps of terrain slopes, about 30 percent of the world’s ice- and permafrost-free land under 11 degree slope, 11 degrees being the maximum for efficient crop farming. Even today Australia has only 0.4 percent of the world’s population, and a 1980 book of mine titled Collins Gem Basic Facts: Geography showed Australia to have four times the second-highest ratio of arable land to population (although because no explanation is given the figures could mean rural population). The result is that, unlike farmers on young, less flat continents, it is cheapest for Australian farmers to degrade their land and clear more, and still more efficient for farmers to simply “get big” by continuous merging, as recent reports on the Murray-Darling Basin have demonstrated.

A third issue is that the dense rooting systems of Australian native flora mean there is essentially zero baseflow in almost all Australian rivers, and that because of this rainfall elasticities of runoff are two to three times values for similar climates in the Northern and Western Hemispheres. Consequently, even relatively minor climate changes can severely threaten river health.

A fourth issue is that whilst Australia is a net exporter of food its production is not essential to global food supply. Removing our antiquated soils from farming would mean higher profits for farmers abroad who have much more incentive to care for their land.

A fifth point is that if Australia’s ultra-fragile farmland were restored to native flora – an opinion I was suspicious of at university but which I was converted to by bitter experience with runaway rainfall changes – ecotourism based on Australia’s true status as the only Quaternary continent approximating the ecology of the glacier- and upwelling-free majority of Earth’s history would give considerably improved understanding for all the world’s people.

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#1495509 - 20/03/2019 20:15 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: mianfei]
Seina Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 27/08/2003
Posts: 7770
Loc: Adelaide Hills
Originally Posted By: mianfei
Australian soils are a wholly non-renewable resource, because the last significant soil renewal occurred during the Carboniferous, 300,000,000 years ago. For an illustration that is 75,000,000 years before the first dinosaurs. In most Quaternary continents, soils are a renewable resource replenished via uplift and erosion of high mountains.

Would like to know about the 300 million figure for soil renewal in more detail smile .

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#1495528 - 20/03/2019 20:48 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Seina]
Seina Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 27/08/2003
Posts: 7770
Loc: Adelaide Hills
Originally Posted By: Seira
Originally Posted By: mianfei
Australian soils are a wholly non-renewable resource, because the last significant soil renewal occurred during the Carboniferous, 300,000,000 years ago. For an illustration that is 75,000,000 years before the first dinosaurs. In most Quaternary continents, soils are a renewable resource replenished via uplift and erosion of high mountains.

Would like to know about the 300 million figure for soil renewal in more detail smile .

Cancel that -- find it myself smile .

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#1501022 - 23/06/2019 01:23 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: Greg Sorenson]
amphetamarine Offline
Weather Freak

Registered: 18/03/2004
Posts: 363
Loc: Cairns
high five

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#1503070 - 27/07/2019 12:17 Re: Farming, food production and consumers [Re: bundybear]
adon Offline
Meteorological Motor Mouth

Registered: 19/08/2004
Posts: 5339
Loc: Not tellin!
Are you suggesting topsoils are created only by sedimentation and therefore can only increase by millimeters per century?

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