Chewing Straw - Over the back fence.

Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/12/2002 17:30

Looking back at "Farming - Tell me all" i think we hijacked Temp traces thread a little at times, & i have thought for a while that we should have a thread for just odd chats that does'nt warrent a new thread each time? I thought "Chewing Straw" was what all country folk did when talking about nothing in particular, but my wife said its a male thing, should be "chatting over the back fence" so compromise title... To get started, i'll just report an unfortunate fire east of here last week started by a Brand New Header on 1st or 2nd days work!!! Investigation underway but have'nt heard outcome. We have no crop, but thought it was timely reminder, so got firefighter out and blasted all rubbish off tractor, mower, ute etc. My neighbour asked why I was worried, he recond the bearings on my gear were that worn that they would be "air cooled" - bit cruel i thought. My daughter had her car stolen in Perth last week, on our policy, & when talking to insurance rep he told me that there were 2 or 3 header fires in our region each year! I would have thought in this day & age this would'nt be that common!! Whats the score elsewhere?? On other fronts, only green feed now is the re-growth in the hay paddock, will be starting some sup feeding next week, i dont like to run the animals down too far, so recon its better to start earlier than later, & we will only just trickle a bit of grain out to get rumen ready for diet change. Have u finished harvest completely Goody, hows that gernination Mcg. Any moisture at all Heather?
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/12/2002 18:35

Hi FE and all
Yes germination is happening...looking great especially where it has been burnt. Getting the Super on to it now is the big issue. We love Christmas so we will get that out of the way first. We have cloud cover at the moment and the forcast is for some rain. That would be perfect but will wait and see. Still feeding all the stock but a green tinge just seems to lift the spirit and give hope doesn't it. One of the other threads were talking about the back to back El'nino of 1942. They are convinced that we will experience that this time around, even suggested that when it starts to rain we should sell stock as we will be going straight bach into it. Not a good thought...talk about put fear into us...i hope they are wrong. Bad luck with the fires...it does make you orgainse things to prevent it happening but sometimes you just can't do everything. Only so many hours in a day unfortunately. Better go, on the way out for dinner at friends...waht a treat. Talk to you all soon i hope. :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/12/2002 22:59

Sorry to hear about the car FE mad
And the fires confused are they for real???

Still no rain had a fantastic thunder & lightning show this afternoon,few spots of rain which we sat in & had a beer at least we know it can happen laugh laugh laugh
Today will be 91days since we had rain in the guage.

Hope you had a nice evening out with your friends mcg laugh laugh

Heather
Posted by: thirstydirt

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2002 06:24

Hi FE yes header fires still happen all the time 2 weeks ago around here a contractor lost his new John deere to fire 5 hours on the clock , think it was an electrical fault in engine managment system or loose battery terminal, but she was stuffed.
In normal years you get a few going up especially in things like lentils, they are real firestarters with fine powdery dust and heaps of static.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2002 10:52

Sounds like pretty dangerous work to me TD

Heather
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2002 21:06

Heather i feel for you 91 days no rain. We had been 110 days until the week before last (1") and last week (3"). What do you do? How are you copeing? Do you have cattle?
Thank you we had a lovely 'outing' last night, it is nice to get off the place for a while. Christmas will be at home as we have to stay with the calves. We usually go to friends on Boxing Day. They are not hand feeding calves so i am hoping they will come here. It is such a great time of year and i refuse to let the conditiond ruin it. What are you all doing for Christmas?
Talk to you soon i hope
:cheers:
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2002 22:57

G'day all,

Being part of the farming fraterinity here on the WZ forums I thought I'd better introduce myself-I'm Tony Peterson from the Killarney region in QLD and we operate a beef cattle operation on two aggregations in the district. We live on 80 acres of mostly cultivation at Killarney (forage oats for finishing cattle in the winter), and about 1600 acres in The Head valley in the Great Dividing Range. The Murray Darling river system begins just above us in the hills and flows through our place, down to Killarney and then throughout the Darling Downs.

Our place is mostly made up of creek flats and drained swamp, with the country becoming more undulating as you go further away from the creek. All pasture growing is native-with varieties such as kikuya, paspalum, cocksfoot and ryegrass being the most common. Our carrying capacity is around the 400-450 head mark in a good season, but at the moment we are only running around 250 head due to the drought-the worst since the Petersons first came to the area in 1902!

Breed wise we mainly stick to the good old reliable Herefords, although we do have quite a few Santa Hereford X, Shorthorn and Shorthorn Limosin X. These are bought in as 6-8mth old weaners from the Casino store sales held in the autumn, and sold at about 3 years of age to the Jap Ox market.

I'm only 15 and take a great interest in farming and anything associated with it and would like to someday take over-but I would also like to make a career out of accounting or maybe business management. My plan is to just basically "play it by ear" and see what happens. Nothing is set in concrete yet.

BTW, have any of you had much to do with or own/owned any Chamberlain tractors? We have a 1967 Countryman 354 we use as a front end loader tractor and has been a great machine. I am a bit of a self confessed Chamberlain fan and wondered what some of you think about them. Any stories or info would be much appreciated.

(Sorry about the long post!)
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Flame

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/12/2002 00:58

Hi all,
Finished harvest last monday, Barley averaged .76 of a tonne/ Ha and wheat 1 tonne/Ha frown On headers burning had one burnt near hear last week total melt down.Was a week before we could get the fire in the grain tank out. The new machines contain more electrial wiring to short out, more hydrolics to leak oil and fuel a fire once it starts . Run at higher speeds,and are closed in with guards and covers so they collect more chaff around moving parts and so you dont see any thing going wrong until it starts smoking.A few spots of rain this afternoon with red dust in it so must have been windy farther north.

:cheers: Flame
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/12/2002 16:33

Hi to Everyone once more !

Hello & welcome also to Peto & Flame ..... laugh

Great idea FE with this chat forum so to speak

The harvest here was like Thirstydirts just a pretend one, it started early then was all over in no time with people just wanting to forget about it.
It is the way of farming that you look forward to the next yr... it is always going to be the one to pick you up again
I have been winding back the farming FE so not doing too much of it now. I was telling a Vic poultry farmer this recently & he said with a wry smile "It took you a long time to wake up!" I am 51 you see so I laughed laugh

Not much happening this way now with our farming untill the Autumn

If I do not catch all you nice people somewheres before hand may I extend to you now a Merry Xmas & a "very" prosperous All Year Long 2003! :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/12/2002 21:34

mcg & everyone Finally had 10mm of rain last night laugh
It was wonderfull & the smell,there is nothing quite like it is there??? Not drought breaking but it watered the lawn laugh

We have sheep & cattle,we are feeding our Rams atm
Looks like we will start to push some scrub after Xmas frown frown
David &I will be here by ourselves Xmas day as our children go to their inlaws this year,we had a big get together last year.

They will be out Boxing Day with the grand children & that is Davids birthday also smile smile

So I am sure we will have a great day,hope everyone else has an enjoyable time as well
:cheers: Heather
Posted by: Wizzer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2002 09:01

Glad to hear of your 10mm Heather. Nothing here, but nice cool change 16 degrees at 9am.
We might as well last another week with no rain as we are still 20 points below our all time annual rainfall.

Happy Christmas to all.

Wizzer smile
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2002 16:36

Hi all
Heather i am so happy to hear that you have had some rain and yes there is nothing quite like the smell....
Once you have had some rain more is sure to follow, i am confident you will get some more soon.
I hope that you all have a really nice Christmas, enjoy boxing day Heather and Happy Birthday to David, hope it rains for him.
Look forward to hearing from you all soon and to hear what the man in the red suit got for you.
:wave: :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2002 20:22

Thanks mcg & to all our fellow posters on this Forum hope you all have a great Xmas & a WET New Year

David & Heather
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2002 02:34

Merry Christmas Day to u all, still Christmas eve over here - how i hate this time difference generally, & with daylight saving particularly.
Few posting unanswered but we r in the thick of it right now - venison orders for Christmas were mostly finished on Monday and all was going to plan, then smallgoods were to be ready Monday night - but alas no - they were really under the pump ( i truely felt sorry for them) - would be ready first thing Tues, - long story, but ended picking up at 5-30pm tonite so have been packing from 7 pm to now. Not really an ideal Christmas eve but thats life! Christmas day off, then 5 weeks with no break of schools holidays with the Park plus 5 Growers Market days & Dec quarter GST returns frown frown Goody u are right on the money I'm sure i'm too old for all this, but i said that last year!! If u retire properly Goody make sure u teach them how to grow that good C/oil for me to keep cooking my fish in!!!
Great post Peto, i've got a few questions to ask on that one when we have time & i'm sure i've got some great articles on W.A. made Chamberlains around the office somewhere - in Feb i'll take & hour or 3 & hunt them down for u. Did u know about the other good tractor made here for a while called a Phillips "Acremaster" i think? Flame might know more about that one cos he is in the big,big big tractor area at Borden. Again i've got a 20 min video on that - & i'll have to find accidentially cos i've put it in a safe place!
Happy Birthday for Boxing day David - the same day as my Dad's birthday! Great to here u at least got that lovely smell of rain Heather - lets hope Mcg's theory is right & u get some more wink
Good luck Thirstydirt & Wizzer - i see that "cloud/potential rain" band hanging over the east there, but there was'nt much this side from the same pattern - we feel so bad (selfishly)worrying here that our feed doesnt get burnt cos theres been fires all over the place already & the riskiest 2 months yet to come, when so many of u have nothing to burn frown !
Anyway if i dont get to bed Santa wont come i suppose & i think Mrs Santa is asleep already -

Our very best wishes to you all & your families - thanks so much for sharing the every day events that make us realise how lucky we really are over here on the coast this year, our greatest wish is for you all to be the same comfortable position as us this time next year......
:wave: FE
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2002 09:51

Merry christmas everyone...I hope you all have a good WET and safe christmas day. So far we have had 77 points(19mm) at home here and I think a bit more at The Head, so we are pretty happy. Just as well too, because the creek at The Head on Monday was just a tiny trickle-but the same afternoon we had around 25mm in a storm, so that would opened up the springs and got it flowing again.

FE, that would be really great if you could get a hand on that info for me, that would be very much appreciated. I haven't heard of the Phillips Acremaster though, prehaps they weren't too popular in Queensland.

Good to hear you finally got some moisture Heather, although you would probably like about 10 times that amount, but I suppose its something and maybe even a sign of good times to come!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2002 11:54

FE, a great thread - thanks for starting it. I've nothing to add other than to say to all contributers keep it up. The news you are sending is wonderful to read, and I hope all the dry areas of Australia get a good soaking soon (not till March/April is my unfortunate forecast). Happy New Year to all.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/12/2002 08:24

Happy quiet Boxing Day Everyone !!! .... laugh

Very cool cloudy morning here with just the mournfall sound of a solitary crow over by the ck.
Tell you what it is going to hard to keep up with >>> all the Chewings of the straw here ! laugh laugh

Peto glad to hear the rain will get that spring going for you ... Have a look at the Rising Water Tables to Predict Weather Forum & see what you think about what is said there re: What makes springs run etc as your family has lived at The Head for a long time ... you can maybe tell us what the history has been in this regard to droughts ?
Incidently gang I put a thread in there the other day about how the pioneers sank wells

Peto I slipped up the other day on the Chamberlain tractor reply ... I have driven one of those & also the older 9 G ones . Yes they were great tractors for there time laugh
Watch the front wheel bearings though if you do much heavy loader work

FE you & lovely wife are very busy little vegemites over there are'nt you with those run up around the wall critters. Good luck with it all !

:cheers: just because it's boxing day
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/12/2002 02:36

We have just spent the best day with our family
& we have played spotlight,hide & go seek,tips,& danced to all the old rock & roll tunes.Our 9 year old grandson was the DJ & he knows the lot
David has had the best day & said to thank you all for your kind wishes.
The age range was from 52 to 7yrs today & we all have had a great time.This is what life is all about smile smile smile
:cheers: Heather
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/12/2002 16:21

Hi All
Hope you had a really wonderful Christmas. I was spoiled rotten, as usual, and had a great day. I love all the effort and enjoy the company. We are not blessed with a large extended family so we had our own family and some very close friends over, 15 in all, and ate seafood and sat in the spa outside and drank. Everything Christmas and Boxing day should be, lots of good company and fun, a time to enjoy and leave the drought until tomorrow. Hope you all could take the time to unwind for just a day. FE i think you needed some elves to help on Christmas Eve. Did you get it all done? What did Santa bring you all, rain i hope!!!!
We had a little rain on Christmas Eve, 4ml, and it just kept the green pick happening, greening up but need followup rain now. Heather, 'it may not happen overnight but it will happen', have you had anymore rain? Our cattle are finally startoing to look better, the young bulls that have benn on grain look fantastic since the rain, what a difference. Poddy calves are growing, looks like spring.....
Take care all.
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/01/2003 11:25

Happy New Year to all Chewers and Fence Leaners. Well we had some rain (65.8mm BoM, but 34.4mm me)as a farewell to 2002. Let's hope the rest of Oz gets exactly as much as it needs.
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/01/2003 20:54

This is an interesting little poem I found at home today, and is penned by a fellow by
the name of John Carew. Quite a clever and captivating piece of poetry I my
opinion-thought I'd share with everyone here and see what you all think!

In the beginning
there was Earth, beautiful and wild,
And then man came to dwell.
At first he lived like other animals,
feeding himself on creatures and plants around him.
And this was called IN BALANCE WITH NATURE
Soon man multiplied
He grew tired of ceaseless hunting of food;
He built homes and villages.
Wild plants and animals were domesticated.
Some men became farmers so that others might
become industrialists, doctors or artists,
And this was called Society.
Man and Society progressed.
With his God given ingenuity, man learned to feed,
clothe, protect and transport himself more efficently so he might enjoy life.
He bulit cars,houses on top of each other and nylon.
And life was more enjoyable
The men called farmers became efficent
A single farmer grew food for 28 industrialists, doctors and artists.
And writers, teachers; and engineers as well.
To protect his crops and animals, the farmer produced substances to repel insects, diseases and weeds.
These were called pesticides.
Similar substances we made by doctors to protect humans
These were called medicine.
The Age of Science had arrived and with it came
a better diet and longer, happier lives for more members of society
Soon it came to pass
That certain well fed members of society
Disapproved of the farmer using Science.
They spoke harshly of his techinques for feeding, protecting and preserving plants and animals.
They deplored his upsetting of the Balance of Nature;
They longed for the good old days
And this had emotional appeal to thr rest of society.
By this time farmers had become so efficent.
Society gave them a new title:
Unimportant Minority
because societycould never imagine a shortage of food,
Laws were passed abolishing pesticides, fertilizers and food preservatives.
Insects, diseases and weeds flourished.
Crops and animals died.
Food became scarce.
To survive, industrialists, doctors and artists
were forced to grow their own food.
They were not very efficent.
People and governments fought wars to gain more agricultural land.
Millions of people were exteriminated.
The reamining few lived like animals,
feeding themselves on creatures and plants around them.
And this was called IN BALANCE WITH NATURE.


:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/01/2003 09:44

Good poem Tony
pretty true also,& yes lets hope the last bit doesn't eventuate

Heather laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/01/2003 12:53

Interesting poem Tony - was it entitled "The Balance of Nature"?
Hay Question : Not trying to be unkind, knowing how short fed is over there, but when u have round bales left from previous year that have not been kept in the shed, when do u feed them out. 2 schools thought here today - use oldest first & keep new ones till old run out OR use new ones while fresh & keep old ones to use if new bales run out? No this is not a trick question - i would just like to know what other peole do?
Charts look like there is a chance of rain 4 u Heather?
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/01/2003 21:15

Hi all...
Hay answer...we use the old bales first, but the better of the old go to the wet cows and the older bales go to the dry cows and the steers. But we don't antisipate having any surplus ever again the way it is looking.
Things have gone off again and the new growth is withering in the paddock. We are watering what we can but that is only a minute portion. Keep on feeding....
Heather by the look of the map you shoud be having rain...are you?
We had a dry storm tonight....we got a little excited and then nothing...next time hopefully.
Talk to you all soon i hope
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/01/2003 22:45

Yes FE you are correct...copies of it were distributed at a recent Ag Force meeting (which my parents are members of) and I just found it the other day lying around the office desk.

In regard to the hay question, around here it mostly depends on the animals you are feeding, for example animals requiring maximum nutrition such as breeders or dairy cows in lactation would be fed the best quality hay, whereas dry cows or steers would be fed the older, poorer quality hay.

The majority of the hay we use is in the form of small square lucerne bales (used for feeding cattle while in the yards) is kept undercover in the shed, along with half a dozen round bales of barley straw, fed out when we are finishing cattle on oats. This increases the roughage content in their diet so as protein and other nutrients doesn't pass straight through the animal.

Hope this is of some help to you FE.
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Rainlover

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/01/2003 22:59

With dairy cows, I thought that they could only be fed silage(sp?) as they required high protein food, and I thought normal dried out hay didnt have this protein. confused

Also, where do all the farmers here get there seed from?

And what is the difference between Broad Beans, Faba Beans, Tic Beans, and Mung Beans?

Do many farmers here grow clover? Is it used as anything besides a green manure crop?

:cheers:

Rainlover laugh
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 14:32

You're actually spot on there RL in regard to the hay question...dairy cows do need a high protein diet and silage is the most common type of feed used.

However, good quality lucerne or forage sorghum hay is often fed out when silage or other forage is short and while the general protein and nutrition content is lower than silage, it still is nutritious enough for them to produce milk.

In regard to the "bean" question, I'm afraid I really can't help you there as these crops are not very common in this area. Most crops grown around here are of a fairly limited spectrum, with sunflowers, corn and sorghum (summer) and barley and wheat (winter).

Clover (both red and white varieties) is used in pasture and improved pasture around here and in your area as well I would imagine. It is widely used in improved pastures in Southern Australia to prevent Grass Tetany in cattle (a severe magnesium deficency, mostly leading to death if not picked up on). If prolific in pastures cattle will bloat on it (being a legume), but this can be controlled by either bloat oil in their water, capsules inserted orally or drenches.

Hopes this info is of assistance RL.
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 14:59

Good answer Peto, i can't add to that other than to say clover is our very best pasture for animal growth, if u r lucky enough to have a really good clover pasture & have good conditions for hay making it makes outstanding hay that animals prefer over all other hay!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: Rainlover

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 15:06

Thanks guys. :wave: :wave:

Is lucerne grown just for fodder? Or can it be used as a soil improver(green manure), or for human consumption?

Also I have heard about bloat a number of times, is it a condition where the seed in the cows stomach sort of roughens up the sides of the stomach, making them sick?

Also, do many of you grow Tree Lucerne?

Rainlover laugh
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 17:20

Lucerne is actually an incredibly useful form of green manure, probably one of the best green manure crops available. It provides an abundance of green leaf at the peak of its growth and as a legume, it fixes nitrogen from the air to the roots of the plant, which means artificial nitrogen fertilizers are not required to be added to the soil before the next crop.

Bloat in cattle is caused by a build up of gas in the rumen, which encopasses two stomachs that enable plant material to be regurgitated and broken down. When cattle are fed the fresh growth of any legume, a gas from the legume is relased in the process of digestion and this accumulates in the rumen. The gas, which cannot be expelled, eventually builds up until the stomach bursts and the animal promptly dies.

However, if a beast shows signs of bloat, the animal can be stabbed on the top left side and the gas can be safely relased. Another method of control is to administer a large dose of vegetable oil orally via a drench gun. The vegetable oil somehow breaks down the gas and the animal survives.

Lucerne Trees are not grown in my area (South QLD), however I think FE grows a plot for his deer herd...if you have any questions he would be the man to talk to.
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Rainlover

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 17:56

Thanks Tony :cheers:

One question I have is why do some cows get fed lollies, mars bars, chocolate etc? I have seen it on Landline before, but I'm not sure what it was used for. confused

Rainlover laugh
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 18:05

Tony you explain things so well.
We breed Brafords so we don't have problems with bloat. When the feed (clover and Lucern) is really fresh we feed hay out to the cattle before we put the cattle onto the green feed to lessen the amount of green feed passing through their system too quickly. I am sure that Tony could explain that better than i am able to sorry.
Lollies, as far as i know, are given to the cattle to give tham energy when the feed is low and the food they are being given is of poor quality.
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 19:29

Certain breeds of dogs also have a predisposition to bloat - Dobermanns, Weimeraners & Great Danes being 3 of the worst affected breeds. The problem seems to be more predominant within certain body types as well eg: narrow deep chested animals. Is this the same with cattle? Is there a predisposition within some and does body type have anything to do with it?

I ended up with a Dobermann bitch who had a predisposition to bloat (she also seemed to have missed out on the reflex that closes the stomach when it is full and could pack food all the way up her gullet to the back of her mouth (making breathing somewhat difficult). I ended up carrying a tablet of apomorphine with me at all times, but fortunately total control over her habits and environment meant that that was one thing I didn't have to use on her...hoses to open the gullet and injections of apomorphine with crossed fingers that the stomach or intestines hadn't started to twist yes.......

Btw, silage is a great way of fixing gastroenteritis in dogs (haven't tried it myself) - 1 dessertspoon morning and night (I keep a small grass pile under silage conditions for this purpose) and it will clear gastro problems up faster than antibiotics and can be used safely with pregnant & lactating bitches.

Cheers,

Jane
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 21:02

Thanks for your positive comments mcg, very much appreciated!

Jane I think you are right in regard to certain breeds having predispositions to various conditions such as bloat... British breeds are probably more susceptible to bloat due to their smaller frames, whereas larger framed Bos Indicus or Bos Taurus cattle and crosses (such as mcg's Brafords) probably aren't worried by it as much or at all.

:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Beachy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 21:06

Jane, charcoal is fantastic for helping dogs with digestive conditions. Although more for flatulance, it assists with bad breath as well. If you require some for your dog, I can recommend where to get it from.

smile
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 21:39

Thanks for your thoughts Beachy, but unfortunately cardiomyopathy got Tegan at the age of 9 & a half (that runs in families too, and I wish I'd taken the bad molar out that she had & she might have lived a bit longer).

Charcoal is good for flatulence I agree (and bad breath of stomach origins), but unfortunately doesn't have an effect on bloat - depending on how far the dog is into the episode you can do a number of things, but all are pretty radical. Punching into the stomach with a sharp instrument is one that you only do as a last resort, an injection of apomorphine (at the vet)or a tablet under the bottom eyelid (the vet suggested I carry a tablet and sterile water, but a vet nurse taught me the eyelid trick which is faster) work well, making them throw up using washing soda (1st thing to try if you catch it early enough and you have 30 minutes to wait for a result), inserting a hose into the stomach (if it hasn't twisted and you don't have anything else) and a healthy dose of prayer........

Having a dog die of bloat (which a friend had to watch and was powerless to do anything because the bitch had gone into shock after the bowel twisted) is horrendous, and it can happen sooo fast - almost before your eyes..... I watched Tegan literally 'blow up' in front of my eyes the last time she bloated badly.....

Does it happen this fast with cattle?
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2003 22:17

You beat me to it Peto with that poem the balance of nature. I found it on the back of an irrigation for profit book and was going to post it. It was first published in 1970, but seems to be a timeless piece. It is interesting to note that the author was a scientist, teacher and humanitarian.

Onto the topic about the luceana trees I read in the Qld country life about a place near Moonie (southern Qld) that had some planted, it does cope bit of a touch up with the frosts but apparently grows ok that far south.

see all later

:wave: :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/01/2003 10:58

We like the Brafords because they have the Bos- indicus content that gives them resistance to bloat, ticks and eye problems. We don't like the fact that they put so much into their calves they fall away very quickly in hard times. We have had to take all the calves and hand rear them, still in good times they turn off some really lovely vealers, yearlings. Can't have it all can we!!
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/01/2003 16:53

Hi all, 5mm of rain - keep park lawns green & won't hurt dry feed too much, lot of westerly wind. For those in SA if this front could interact with the moisture up in NT u might get some moisture, but theres not much in the front by itself. Thanxs for ideas feeding old hay, in the drought 2 years ago we learnt that when animals are hungary they will eat old hay they would'nt touch the year before! Doubt it had any feed value other than filling space in tummys.

Now a word of warning on GST returns. Some of u might be like me & leave payment to last min at local PO. If u do be careful - friend of mine did that last return & posted off paperwork as she made the payment. ATO conveniently recon it took then over 14 days for return to get to them, so she incurred rather nasty penalty for late logement of the RETURN not the payment being late! U can overcome this by posting off day or so before closing date,and will know when they got it by when cheque goes thru the bank statement.Obviouswly the softly, softly attitude to GST is over, i'd would'nt be surprised if Govt coffers r bit low this year with payment for war on terror & droubt stating to show thru other sectors other than just rural areas - but then i'm a "cynical old ba*****rd"
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/01/2003 20:00

HI all
Great to hear about the rain FE.
Thank you for the GST warning. I knew that the picnic would end soon i just wasn't sure when.
I have heard that the penalties will be harsh so we had all be very diligent from here on in. I won't be able to do my book work late now will i?
Take care all........ :wave:
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/01/2003 23:02

This LINK for fact sheet on Leucaena trees. We did a test plant but our soil is low in phosphorus.
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/01/2003 23:09

Qld DPI also have a Feedlink site for sellers & buyers for stock feed, the link can be found at the bottom right corner of the page Here . We receive emails when fodder is available, has been very helpful.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/01/2003 14:23

I pay my GST by BPay & send the form 2 weeks before it is due not super efficient,just don't want to have to pay any more than needs be

Heather
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2003 03:09

Hi Heather, i think u are very efficient to do it that way! May i just suggest that u make a record of the date u post off the paperwork (ie perhaps the date u sign the form is the date u always post) Being close to town we dont use BPay, but i'm not going to leave it to the deathknock to lodge like i've done in the past - can think of 1,000's better uses for money than paying penalities on penalties, as i still think we r penalised for being non paid tax collectors! mad GOB (= Grumpy Old "Person of doubtful breeding")
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2003 11:24

Hi FE
Yes I make a note of the time ,date, reciept no wink so there is no way I am getting caught laugh

I have asked our accountant for a discount as I do all the book keeping for him :rolleyes:
He just laughed & said it doesn't work that way frown
Silly me laugh

Heather
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2003 12:21

Hi Heather & Others, yes i've learnt u can NEVER have too many records. 18 months ago, we got a notice of Penalty plus threat of Legal Action from ASIC (Oz prize corp regulator)for not having lodged an Annual Company Return for previous year. We had, it had been lodged electronically by our accountant, with cheque attached to hard copy mailed to them the same day. I had their cheque presented on our bank statement at a date well before due date. But NO they would'nt have it. We uplifted the cheque, photocopied it, bank statement, & copy of return - still they proceeded. I was furious so decided to let go the whole hog & take me to court. Accountant got all worried & offered to pay the penalty just to shut them up - NO way i said, & wrote a sting letter - they took absolutely no notice, we wasted hours on this. In the finish after 15 months of arguing they admitted their computer had been down for 2 days at the time our lodgement had been made! In the meantime i got so cross, i transfer all finances out of that company & delisted it. Then had 12 months problems with ATO trying to get off their GST list! All ended up by me just lodging nil return month after month - they eventually contacted me and sent pages of forms for deregistration of ABN! I had lost all patience & sent nothing back other than a photocopy of company deregistration document. Did that 2 times & touch wood havent heard from them since - Luckily we are told we live in the smart country - poor people living in dumb countries must have a terrible time! Hence my warning - keep copies of everything to do with Govt Agencies - IMO they r a law unto themselves & u will get nothing back for the wasted time u spend when something goes wrong!!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2003 12:42

WOW eek FE,sounds like you have been a round or two,after all we are just the common people who pay these morons their wages!!!!
My father inlaw passed away 3yrs ago for 2 1/2 years I tried to have his name taken off the BAS statements laugh silly me,I even had to send a copy of the death certificate to prove he had passed away,this is the last thing you need to deal with .
Then I had to resubmit all of our BAS records once again
We all had to be given new tax file No,s & then change all the No's at the Banks etc :rolleyes:

Pain in the proverbial BUTT

We don't have anything better to do with our time I guess mad mad mad

Heather
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2003 13:38

Hi Heather : Nothing more certain than death & taxes - looks like from yr experience that this lot even want BAS returns after we leave....? I recon the Govt had absolutely no idea what they were implementing with BAS. i've spocken to a lot of o/seas people who have small business, & some of their systems r so simple - IMO our lot were rushed into it, they still cant give u a straight answer - ATO will give advice over the phone to a enquiry after u wait up to 1/2 hrs, but try to get any confirmation....Haha. Ring back next day, get a different officer - get a different answer!!!! IMO they r either totally incompetant, or flying by seat of pants, or just dont care.... It looks to me that we've got "the best of the worst systems from around the world." As u might have guessed i'm in the middle of the rotten thing right now - so not best time for me to speak rationally wink wink
Have u had any rain since the road got washed ??? & what will u do for feed from now on r u cutting scrub?? Feel really deeply for u & others - things r getting bad nth east of us where some didnt harvest crop, the sheep have now used a lot crop & stubble up & now thru April will be hard, & here 75 kms away from them we have had best ever season! Its not really fair!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/01/2003 14:03

Still letting the sheep & cattle fend for themselves as far as food goes,poor things
We are still giving them salt blocks ,& pumping water for them.
David hasn't decided about the scrub cutting as yet.Trying to hang on to see what March will bring,keeping a close eye on the bank account laugh or lack of
We are hand feeding our Rams & that is all atm,they are the most important
Heather
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/01/2003 11:10

So sorry to hear that Heather, just when i thought things were looking better too.
We had to but more grain for the young cattle this week. It has gone up to $395 per ton + GST + delivery. It was $320 + +. It usede to have cotton seed and sorgum added,now it is just Barley and Oats. Wonder what it will be like next year even if it does rain. Such cheery people aren't we? frown
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/01/2003 11:33

MCG
How are you going to afford to feed everthing with prices like that eek eek & probably not much income for this year.

Yes we are all getting a bit sad on it but what is there to look forward to atm frown frown
Be a good 2yrs before we all get back to "normal" & then there will probably be another drought.

But I am sure we will all be able to hang in there with support from each other laugh I think it just helps to know you aren't the only one who has problems,even if it is chatting on a computer it just seems to help a bit laugh
Heather :cheers:

Heather smile
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/01/2003 21:50

Hi All, Time for some laughs...as some of u know part of our farming is deer, so at Christmas time we get lots of Deer jokes, this was this seasons best by far:-
Santa arrives in Oz with sled & r/deer. CASA says "u can't fly that sled around Oz without proper Airworthy certificate Flight docs" Ok says Santa & fills in Flightplan, fires up sled & r/deer for inspection. Lights flashing on sled, Rudolphs nose is all lit up - all ready to go. "Can't go yet " says CASA man "How do i know u can fly, we have to have a quick test flight to see how u handle it". OK says Santa starts to get in sled, but is very surprised to see CASA man carrying a shotgun! "Whats that for?" asks Santa.
The CASA man replies "Well its like this, i'm not supposed to tell you, but part of this flying test involves how you handle an ENGINE failure!!'
frown :cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/01/2003 18:23

Thanks FE
That was refreshing. More jokes.....that's what we need. Fires, Drought lack of income....no we need more jokes to make us laugh and release all those 'endorphens' to make us more positive.
Maybe we should start a joke strand.
sad thing is i am one of those people that say "i really enjoyed that, it was a really good joke" and then can't recall it when i need to repeat it....must ba a girl thing.
I think we should just sell (or give away) all the cows and horses and follow the surf, become beach bums. cool Trouble is the land gets into your blood. Probably pass a stock crate one day and end up following it longingly. Chin up all laugh
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/01/2003 15:43

How are you all? Era you experiencing any extreme temps?
We have it at 45 C today. Just what we need isn't it?
Have been inside watching the Tennis today. Agassi...love him. Don't watch a lot of tennis but love to watch him play. Grosjean is no slouch though. Can't imagine playing in this heat though...not as fit as them either. wink
Posted by: RiverMurray

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/01/2003 16:33

I agree a bit of humour in these times will go a long way. heres one for FE.

The Deer Theory

A herd of deer can only move as fast as the slowest deer. and when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first.

The natural selection is good for the herd as a whole because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. (No ebv's here)

In such the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells, excessive intake of alcohol, as we all know, kills brain cells, but naturally it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first.

In this way, the regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.

Thats why we always feel smarter after a few beers. :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/01/2003 17:27

Hi Carool & welcome to WZ, yep i think your theory is excellent idea, i use it for best venison theory. The meanest & roughest make best smallgoods - herd becomes quiet & well behaved very quickly wink wink Can u believe it we just had 41 degrees here (shocking for sth coast weaklings) - thats just a bit above yesterdays forecast for 35 today! We had a fire Monday about 2 kms west of us, in a Govt Reserve with lot of bush. Lucky for us we have had easterlies since, but r waiting to see how strong the westerly will come thru when the cool change comes thru!
Anyone getting any rain anywhere where its needed ? - we r still happy with dry conditions for a while yet.
:wave: FE
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/01/2003 20:26

Just checked out the Brisbane radar and couldn't believe the amount of rain falling to the west of us, a huge area stretching from about Tenterfield to Toowoomba. The rumbles seem to be getting closer-hopefully we might score some decent rain this evening!

There was quite a significant cloudburst at Murray's Bridge (halfway between Warwick and Killarney) yesterday leaving huge amounts of water lying in the cultivation, although large amounts of rain like that in such a short space of time can often do more damage than good. We were lucky enough to get under a storm at The Head the other day: 21mm registered in the gauge at the house there, but at the eastern end of the valley there was next to nothing!

The heat here has been a killer-literally unfortunately; the local poultry farm where I work a few mornings a week recorded 300 dead out of flock of around 20 000. The temperature in the sheds was around 40 degrees and the humidity being around 80% really knocked them around. Usually you can expect maybe 20 to 50 dead in this kind of weather, but this particular batch of birds were deprived of water for some time while being raised, the ill effects of which showing up at the moment.

Those rumbles are getting closer-better sign off before my modem gets zapped!
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/01/2003 14:28

carool - (only because you sound like you know what you're talking about) :cheers: I'm trying to discover just where all my dead brain cells are now located. Is my "stuffed head" feeling caused by some sort of overload? :p
Posted by: RiverMurray

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/01/2003 13:54

Dear inclement, sorry to hear about your "stuffed head". to determine where your dead brain cells have gone, you will have to first determine whether they were the red or white ones. this is a fairly simple procedure.

for the next seven nights record whether you wake up on your left side or on your right side. a little tip, start your sleep on your back.

Remember right is white , red is well u know.

let me know the results and we will see if we can find them.

in the mean time i hope your "stuffed head" improves.

cheers :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/01/2003 14:59

Hi All, whats happening ?? - bucket loads of rain in the Nth West & Top End, but a whole lot of Oz still very dry! S/Hols just about over, with a big drop in rural families about this year which is very sad for so many, as i remember how much i used to look forward to our annual hols when i was a kid & we lived inland! Few business in town now starting to hurt also - takes a while for "townies" to understand that what effects farmer will sooner or later effect them. I was told last week that a farmer in the eastern wheat belt had harvested 6,000 acres for 40tons of wheat...had no sheep left & could'nt buy any - so sad! We have a huge influx of rats ATM - driving me mad, eating rat baits with little effect, clothing in sheds, ute seat & nesting everywhere in machinery ...wonder if this is a new break of season sign or more a sign of things drying up in the bush & rats moving into civilization (our buildings!). BTW i hear that the dry is now official & has finally reached Sydney itself... so dry that Bottom of Harbour Schemes have resurfaced & HIH is out of liquidation...luckily i don't believe all i hear!
Hope u can hang in there & what happened up north could drift sth next time!!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/01/2003 11:35

Don't know FE. I think we are almost at the end of our tether. Can't continue like this and don't have any alternatives.
We applied to subdivide our unproductive portion of land, close to town, three years ago and the dep Planning is still procrastinating. Meanwhile we have our back to the walland our cattle on a lease with no feed. We have asked local members and even the minister to inervene, still we wait. So very frustrating, bet if it was their application it would have been looked at immediately. mad mad mad
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/01/2003 12:40

Still waiting for the rain like the rest of Australia
Certainly not enjoying this heat one little bit.
Someone told me the other day it wasn't going to rain until Next Year eek eek eek
We will be in the deepest of deep by that stage,probably have to visit all family & friends in town so we can get a feed laugh laugh that will sort out the frienships then laugh

Hang in there everyone

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/01/2003 13:43

Hi Mcg, i get real mad when i hear about govt agencies & people who sit on bottoms in comfy chairs & take 3 years to decide something...i take it that if u could subdivide off some land, u would then have either another title to allow finance or sale thereof, thus providing avenue to finance some feed & carry on finance? U can't do this cos nobody will make a decision? If thats the case, (& i'm not a rebelious person) i would strongly suggest u think about getting a TV crew out there for a news story on how beauracts are starving u & the animals.... sadly, if theres one thing that motivates our political & govt sector its bad publicity. But be fair, ring whomever u have been dealing with (govt agency & polly) & give them a time frame ie 7 days - to get something done or the media will be invited to look at your desparate situation - might sound drastic, but it sounds to me like things are drastic for u!!!!
If i'm out of order sticking my head in here -i appologise (i've been thru the same loop with a property subdivision) & it wasn't until i got media involved in claims of "poor govt practice" that things actually moved! In meantime we truely feel for you & hope & pray something good will happen soon - very best wishes FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/01/2003 20:26

Thank you FE
Strange you should mention that.....i took it upon myself to contact the ministers office and the Dep Planning NSW. I told them axactly that....we were suffering terribly with the drought and if a positive disecion wasn't forthcoming then a media crew would be visiting them with me on Friday.
I had contact within two hours to say that the minister was looking at it immediately and would sign off on it this week...funny that.
Yes the subdivision is to allow us to repurchase a more productive holding somewhere...are there any left in the country?, and assist us in surviving this drought.
Thank you so much for your advise and taking the time to give it...it is appreciated. wink
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/01/2003 22:26

Hi Mcg, so pleased something looks favourable for you, i tried to send you a PM on the matter, but something did'nt work there - dont let up on them now, if they dont deliver on times they have stated, keep on that phone " squeaky wheel gets the oil" so you keep squeaking! What would happen if farmers took 3 years to decide what crop to plant & when!! just makes me mad... Have a few little dramas here ATM that i'm on the edge of so must finish up quickly - take care Mcg & Others & think positive thoughts even if you get a bit mad (ie angry) at the same time!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/01/2003 07:02

Good for you mcg
Pleased things are looking a bit brighter for you

All the best to everyone

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/01/2003 11:12

How are you going Heather?
I think of you all so often, it helps us to get through the day i think. Some of you don't see many other people as you are just trying to survive i know. It is so desperate here near Singleton, i can only imagine what you are going through. Such a helpless feeling. frown
Just had a call from a friend near Merriwa. He has fought to survive, like all of us, but he has been struggling harder than us and now he is out of water for the stock. We went out and helped him equip a well the other day, now he has found out that even the well has failed. No onther options as yet...what do you do!!! Have to go out and give it one more try.....drill for some water nearby...doesn't look good though mad mad
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/01/2003 14:02

mcg

Please tell you friend we are thinking of him & we hope he finds the water

It's kind of comforting to know we are all thinking of each other as we try to get through this "bloody" drought frown frown

Best wishes

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/02/2003 04:15

Hi All - 5th Feb already, thank goodness as its our first day off since Christmas Day and first 2 day break since 1st fortnight of Dec! We are getting too old for this yearly madness. Its been & interesting 6 weeks with 2 fires & my good wife had a rushed air trip to Perth for health treatment & few days in the local hospital. I had to become Mum & do office work for last 2 weeks (bonus computer time & WZ as reward wink ) then i got septic finger by being bitten by a rabbit showing kids how to handle the critters. laugh ..my good neighbour said i should have known better as it was a Russian Blue & should have known not to trust foreigners especially rabbits! (but he's never got over buying a Belarus tractor). We had a big sand pad put down last week for a new shed -this is meant to be the start of the big "retirement" move onto another block closer to town, & my wife doesn't want one of my "b****y big" great ever growing sheds there (a good shed with a leanto onto a leanto..) This is the first shed i've ever had built, having previously built all my own so they could keep growing wink We got a bobcat with laser level in to compact & level a pad - beautiful job, so put star pickets in with electric fence to keep cows away. Yes it had to happen, last night one of "my roos" (seeing i'm the one who lets them stay here) got hooked up & pulled fence over and 70 cows had a dance party on the inviting sand pad - result was like a rodeo ring after a 2 week competition !!! (if i'd built the shed i'd put the floor in after wink ) So tomorrows planned first fish day off will instead be spent trying to re-level the dance floor for cows again! Still my neighbour will have fun reminding me of this for next couple of years no doubt - such is life & i really appreciate having such a good neighbour that we can pull each other leg about these sort of things & see the funny side makes life worthwhile!
Now the maps are showing some lows extending down from the north & expected to cover a lot of inland area in Qld & down into NSW towards the end of this week & the black cockies have a few excited over there.... what do you all think, possibility of a drop or not? I really hope we see some posts soon in Heather's rain thread!
Will finish off with a funny story we heard this week - an overseas tourist travelled from Perth to Albany with video camera ready hoping to see a kangaroo along the way. Frustratingly the only ones he found were dead roos the roadtrains had hit. In desparation to find a good photo he selected a freshly "dead" roo with no marks and lifted it up against a road sign warning of roos on road. Then he decided it would look better with his coat over its arms & shoulders. Imagine his surprise when looking thru the view finder he saw the the "dazed" roo regained consciousness & hopped off with jacket containing wallet & passport!!! laugh laugh I've got a sneaking feeling i've heard this before - but maybe theres two easily fooled tourist in the world confused
Sincerely hope you get some rain this week - our very best wishes to you all from the West..
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/02/2003 10:45

I am so pleased FE to hear that we are not the only ones that things like that happen to. (the shed not the Roo)
I have a list a mile long of tales, but it would sound like an 'I told you so' segment. If we had a thread of "I told you so's" i could fill it i think. But would i own up to my mistakes or only my Hubbys?????
Maybe if you have some sheep you could let them onto the Dance Floor (as it will now affectionately be known) and really compact it for you.
Much cloud here in the Singleton area but NO RAIN.
I didn't think it could get worse than it was at Christmas, but it has.
:wave:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/02/2003 21:46

How are you all? Have you had a good week?
We love having the kids home but it was inevitable that they would have to go back and this was the week. Our son started at a new school this year so this has been a very stressful week getting him settled and comfortable enough that he actually want to get out of the car in the morning. Peer pressure, i would hate to have to go through that again.
Has anyone had any moisture? We've had lote of cloud but no rain. Poor people in Qld from drought to floods in a few hours. What do they say 'if it doesn't rain it pours' or something to that effect. I feel for them.
We have spent a few days trying to source some feed for the cattle...never ending...it is getting so hard to find anything and when you do you have to wonder if you can afford it!!!
They say the weather patterns are changing so let's hope that by this time next week we are all comparing rainfall. :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/02/2003 02:18

Hi Mcg, just sat down with a cuppa (meat packing tonite for tomorrow mornings markets)& as i sit over here looking at that big expanse of green (on WZ Oz map) across the east coast from top Cape York to almost Melbourne, i wondered if any of you had got anything out of it? We haven't heard from Goody for weeks or from Boy F Bush for a while with his irrigation, or from Inclement, Tahnee, & Peto, while obviously D & D (Heather) & yourself are wondering what nature can deal out next! Worrying times all round. Had a smile about your son & school - i know someone once said "school days are the best days of your life!" but i often wondered whether that person went to a country school! When i was a kid & first started school, we had really long school bus lead times 7-15am for 8-30 arrival at school & home at 4-30pm - a long for a small kid. Then going away for Senior High School - trying to look like it was great fun when Dad & Mum left you for another lonely term. I really found the time between my first job at 18 & getting married at 25 were the really great "carefree" years lot better than school for me!
Must go Mcg, at least clouds can sometimes have rain in them - better than clear sky! BTW poured that cement slab today & yes - i both moved the cows & repaired e/fence (as she's told me to originally!!) didn't want to get home from markets tomorrow & find 70 "cerimonial hoof" prints in the cement! wink
Hope to hear some rain reports soon!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/02/2003 11:14

Hi FE
Still nothing out this way,but storms predicted today who knows confused confused Just the luck of the draw,but at least it is raining in some parts of the country so that is a start. laugh

Pleased you have your slab poured, progress at last laugh laugh

Any way hope we all get some decent falls pretty soon
All the best

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/02/2003 07:53

Hi all
No rain as yet, each day we are closer (as they say). 'probably caused by terrorism' others would say. Very frustrationg, i would say.
Still drilling for water at our friends, although we could only help for a short time as we had to feed. he still is hoping to find water and hasn't given up at the 100' mark. I suppose if you,ve come this far then it is hard to even imagine givig up. You become so determined to 'beat this thing' or at least last the distance, i can only imagine how devestating it must be to reach the stage where you have to say, enough i can't do any more. frown
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/02/2003 11:19

Being housebound for the best of reasons (rain), I found this forum site. We recieved 40mm rain last night and it appear that most places in this district have had anything from 25 to 75 mm over the last few days. Although it wont do much as it is our first rain since a very lean 'wet' which ended last Feb, it gives us a bit of heart, with rainfall prospects for the next week looking promising. Hopefully the rain will spread to all areas very soon.
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/02/2003 22:22

Hello All;

Sorry for my lack of posts, but I have been pretty busy lately with school, homework, stuff around the farm etc. I certainly can relate to the your son's predicament MCG, I have just started at a new school in Warwick and the last fortnight getting settled in has been pretty stressful, but it is not too bad now. Living in the country equals long bus trips as FE mentioned; I catch the bus at 7:30am and get home at around 4:30pm, although some kids have to catch it as early as 7:00 and don't get home till 5:00, a long day indeed.

On the rain side of things we have done pretty well really although more is needed. 30mm at Killarney and 83mm at The Head; greened everything up and put a flow (albeit a small one) back in the creek at The Head. Apparently we are going to get a few showers/storms around for the next few days, hopefully we might get something out of that.

I think the effects of TC Beni have been a bit sensationalised in the media of late; the so called "drought breaking rain" never got much further than the ranges in most cases. Some people at Clermont (Central QLD) we know only got a disappointing 4mm out of the whole system! Although I noticed Tambo (down the road from Longreach) got about 104mm last night, I'm sure that would be very welcome.

Good luck with your friends water drilling MCG, hope he manages to find a decent water supply down there soon.
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/02/2003 22:48

Hi FE and all, been pretty flat out the last few weeks. We ran out of water for the cotton 3 weeks ago. The crops really starting to stress now. Busy now trying to get machinery ready for picking. Finished working up 1 paddock for wheat and the inside of a dam as well. Worker managed to get a tractor bogged down to just over the axles in the dam. At the moment I'm trying to get my office organised a little bit better as I was accepted into a cotton production course by correspondence starting end of Feb.

How much rain has everyone had out of this system, we managed to get 3mm. Hey Peto have you heard any reports from over near Glenlyon Dam, justI'm hoping for some good flows into the dam.


Cheers, BFTB

:wave: :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/02/2003 12:37

HI all
Good to hear from you Tony and BFTB. We are on our way to Warwick for the Polocrosse Worl Cup in April. We are playing in Killarney first and then on to Warwick. I don't think we will be getting much Polocrosse in this year though due to the weather. We have more calves needing to come in and go on the bottle so that will tie us down again.
Great to hear someone is getting some rain we are almost desert here.
How is the Cotton crop BFTB. Has the quality suffered because it has been stressed? I don't know a great deal about Cotton only that it needs lots of water to grow.
Hope you are all surviving. I suppose we should all try and look on the bright side, whatever that is. Does anyone have a 'joke' or a 'yarn' to share?Take care all. No still no water where they are drilling... frown
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/02/2003 17:36

Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/02/2003 17:42

Joe grew up in a small town, then moved away to attend college and law school. He decided to come back to the small town because he could be a big man in this small town. He really wanted to impress everyone. He opened his new law office, but business was very slow at first. One day, he saw a man coming up the sidewalk. He decided to make a big impression on this new client when he arrived.

As the man came to the door, Joe picked up the phone. He motioned the man in, all the while talking...

"No. Absolutely not. You tell those clowns in New York that I won't settle this case for less than one million..." "Yes. The Appeals Court has agreed to hear that case next week. I'll be handling the primary argument and the other members of my team will provide support..."

"Okay. Tell the DA that I'll meet with him next week to discuss the details..."

This sort of thing went on for almost 5 minutes. All the while the man sat patiently as Joe rattled instructions. Finally, Joe put down the phone and turned to the man. "I'm sorry for the delay, but as you can see, I'm very busy. What can I do for you?"

The man replied, "I'm from the phone company...I came to hook up your phone."
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/02/2003 18:28

Great joke Heather! laugh

As far as I know Glenlyon Dam didn't get any inflow from this last rain event BFTB, if it did I don't think it would of been much anyway.

Quote:
Originally posted by mcg:
. We are on our way to Warwick for the Polocrosse Worl Cup in April. We are playing in Killarney first and then on to Warwick.
Killarney? Thats where I live (sort of anyway)! I'll have to drop in and say g'day while your in the area. Polocrosse has a big following in the Killarney district, fair few juniors and heap of adults play. Some of the big names in it are the Graysons, Domjahns, Lambs, Ross and the Hancocks; do you know any of these people MCG?

BTW MCG, whereabouts are you staying in Warwick? Apparently all accomodation was booked out months ago and people are staying as far away as Goodiwindi and Toowoomba for the event! eek
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/02/2003 21:08

We managed to get a cabin in Warwick itself. Most of the Polocrosse fraternity are very self sufficient and live out of their vehicles (trucks or goosenecks). We had to sell our Gooseneck after our son plyed at the Nationals in Darwin last July. The drought got too taxing...you know how it goes...
Anyway we will be sending the horses with someone else and travelling by car. It will be a very rare event being the World Cup and all. We have friends coming over from America to visit and watch, then our Son has been invited to play over there for the US in their Nationals in July. That, however, would only be a consideration if the weather breaks.
It would be great if you could come and say Hi to us if/when we get up there. We won't be playing much in our Zone this year as the 'Grounds' will be too hard for the horses and as most of us are from the land, not many will be able to spare the time.
We had a very promising storm front this afternoon, looked really great on the radar then.......nothing!!! As usual. At least we know that storms are about, possibly it could mean a change for the better...oh how we cling to hope don't we. wink Keep smiling and thank you both for the humour, we all need as much of that as we can get. I will do my best to contribute too but i am the type of person that says that was a great joke i must remember that, then i forget it shocked I will try harder.. but if there are more 'yarns' or 'jokes' lets hear them....please! If it won't rain at least we can share a laugh laugh laugh :wave:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/02/2003 19:02

A new monk arrives at the monastery. He is assigned to help the other monks to copy the old laws and canons of the church by hand.
He notices that the other monks are copying from copies and not from the original manuscript.
So the new monk goes to the Abbot to question this,pointing out that if someone made even a small error in the first copy it would never be picked up.
In fact, that error would be continued in all subsequent copies.
The head monk says "We have been copying from copies for centuries, but you make a good point my son."
So he goes down into the dark caves under the monastery where the original manuscript is held in a locked vault that hasn't been opened for hundreds of years.
Hours go by and no-one sees the old Abbot, so the young monk gets worried and goes down to look for him.
He sees him banging his head against the wall. His forhead is all bloody and bruised and he is crying uncontrollably.
The young monk asks the old Abbot "what's wrong father?"
With a choking voice the old Abbot replies"The word is CELEBRATE" laugh
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/02/2003 19:46

I found this and thought i would share it....
SECOND PLACE

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson go on a camping trip. After a good dinner and a bottle of wine, they retire for the night, and go to sleep.
Some hours later, Holmes wakes up and nudges his faithful friend. "Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see."
"I see millions and millions of stars, Holmes" replies Watson.
"And what do you deduce from that?"
Watson ponders for a minute.
"Well, astronomically, it tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, I observe that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three. Meteorologically, I suspect that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful, and that we are a small and insignificant part of the universe. What does it tell you, Holmes?"
Holmes is silent for a moment. "Watson, you idiot!" he says. "Someone has stolen our tent!"
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/02/2003 09:58

A very depressed man
There's a man sitting at a bar just looking at his drink. He stays like that for half an hour. Then, a big trouble-making truck driver steps next to him, takes the drink from the guy, and just drinks it all down.

The poor man starts crying. The truck driver says, "Come on man, I was just joking. Here, I'll buy you another drink. I just can't stand seeing a man crying."

"No, it's not that. This day is the worst of my life. First, I fall asleep, and I'm late to my office. My boss, in an outrage, fires me. When I leave the building to my car, I found out it was stolen. The police say they can do nothing. I get a cab to return home and when I leave it, I remember I left my wallet and credit cards there. The cab driver just drives away. I go home and when I get there, I find my wife sleeping with the gardener. I leave home and come to this bar. And when I was thinking about putting an end to my life, you show up and drink my poison."
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/02/2003 22:36

A rich couple are approaching their 40th wedding anniversary. The husband cannot for the life of him think of a suitable present, do he asks his wife what she might like.
"A mink coat?" he says.
"No," says his wife.
"Okay, how about a new Mercedes?"
"No," says his wife.
Becoming quite frustrated, the man retorts angrily, "Well what the hell do you want then!!?"
"A divorce," his wife replies.
"Oh," says the man, "I wasn't planning on spending that much."
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/02/2003 01:37

Hi Mcg, The charts still have some moisture heading down the centre in next few days, my fingers are still crossed. BTW i saw your post in Lounge re Iraq, as i've suggested to a few others, could i suggest that you go back into "My Profile" in your registration and change your settings to allow you to recieve "Private Messages" thru WZ. Sometimes you might get additional info/data from people who for many reasons may not wish to post it in their reply to your thread. wink
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/02/2003 10:01

Thank you FE i will do that now.. smile
Yes we are seeing some cloud around at the moment...if i ignore it it might do something to get my attention.
I am sure that if someone could they would blame the drought on terrorism. Maybe mother nature has become a terrorist....that whould be quite a force to be reckoned with alongside the Middle East.. laugh
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/02/2003 18:39

mcg - I can remember when some adults did genuinely blame the weather conditions "on the bomb" (the bombs on Hiroshima, and Nagasaki, and amazingly others were too polite to argue. :rolleyes:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/02/2003 22:21

Hi Inclement, i also remember that - & how do we know that perhaps they might'nt have been right?!? wink wink
:cheers: FE
Posted by: Flame

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/02/2003 11:53

HI FE
Just a quick roundup, My waters OK but a lot of dry dams north and west of me, and long time soaks drying up thats never happened before.Dry feed was hanging in but its stuffed now every thing has germinated now and I expect it to all die in the next couple of weeks.Been trying to buy pellets to feed the sheep but can't get any.
rain fall, couple of storms and drizzel most of the week from the 11th, 5.4mm I think that was on the 8th, I was away for the week end, 5.0mm, 2.2mm,0.0, 0.6mm, 1.0mm, and last night 19.0mm. 40mm plus to the east of me.
:cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/02/2003 12:33

Hi Flame, u certainly had more out of this than us (13mm for 3 days)& likewise a heavy germination showing thru here today & far too early i feel even for us on the coast. I'm a bit annoyed with myself for leaving a couple of paddocks shut up too late, as it won't have much value after this, hard to get it right sometimes, but i had'nt started feeding yet (will now) latest start to feeding out in 30 years we have been here, & i'm only just slowly learning not to overstock frown
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/02/2003 10:58

Hi all
We had a little rain here in Singleton last night. Nothing to get excited about but anything is welcome ( had 5mm). Maybe more will come later but we don't hold out much hope. Long range weather forecast is not good they are syaing June now. I wonder if they really know. :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/02/2003 11:42

JUNE we aren't going to last that long & either will the poor animals
Pleased you got some rain this is what we had here yesterday & would you believe we got a quick shower nothing in the guage though frown
Went around us & on into Cobar,they copped the lot my son measured 50mm in his guage,they needed it in the town,but I wish we had of got it as well

Heather
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/02/2003 22:50

Hi All, having had 29 mm over the last week & clover shot everywhere which is far too early, i phoned round feed suppliers today to decide what i'll buy for winter, & got a few pleasant surprises, one of which i'll pass on if its of interest to anyone. Our regular pellet supplier has cubes at $315 pt + GST & a plentiful supply (with small grain crop here i thought it would be much higher than last year - but not so). Some have gone over east on "backloads" again the freight cost thing is unkown. However he has the name of a freight agent who MAY be able to get backloading. If anyones interested, PM me & i'll give you contact name for you to check out for yourselves.

:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/02/2003 12:38

20mm of rain in the past two days

It's all a big help,makes you feel a bit more optimistic :wave: :wave: :wave:

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/02/2003 16:40

Hi all
Heather PLEASE tell me you have had good rain!!!!
We have had 30 ml so far, it is still raining. I have been out in it today, we moved some cattle, and didn't even wear a coat, it felt so beautiful.
Hope we all still communicate after the rain.... wink
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/02/2003 00:06

Well we can't satisfy everyone all the time, eh? Since the rain started to fall at about 0330 hours yesterday I registered exactly 46mil and BoM about 10kms away show 28.4. This is good for the wheat, sheep, veggie, and cattle farmers but not good news for those with grapes not yet picked - here comes the rot.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/02/2003 00:44

Hi Inc, the same story over here, grapes growers not happy with 30 mm over last week! They are also having trouble with crows - my neighbour got local gun club in with shot guns - got 1 crow laugh & i've been getting up early to shootcrows with .22 as they have been pecking our guinea pigs that roam about free in the park - i donated 2 crows to vineyard this week - missed about 4 wink Adds a bit of fun to the day!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/02/2003 05:57

G'day FE. Duh! Wheat, wool, and meat growers around here are generally called "cockies" and other producers (orchards, vinyards) are called "blockies".
Does a similar classification exist in WA?
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/02/2003 02:28

Hi Inc, similiar terms here, had'nt heard "blockies" but understand it - over here they would be called "Hobby" farmers, except a few that were "Hobby" farms once are million dollar operations now particularly in wine growing! We also have "Hay Street" farmers - i've heard "Pitt Street" mentioned over your way! This group gets the stick the most over here, cos they tend know all the lurks about dogging tax, seem to get the most rediculous subsidies & grants & never put much into the community...
Anyway goodluck to them all, they don't get to really enjoy the smell of the rain etc wink wink

10 road trains (B Doubles + prime mover, 2 semi's)left from over here Friday with baled hay for east - cost estimated @ $7,000 per unit ( i think about 50/60 bales per unit but not sure?) Hope this rain gets where its needed the most & you get some follow up rain soon wink
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/02/2003 14:30

Hi to all
Had a weekend away, what a treat, kids had riding/horsemanship lessons with a fellow called Glen Gough. Absolutely brilliant, even i learned.
The rain was absolutely beautiful, 33points. I have to admit i shed a tear, it means so much to have some moisture in the ground. All we need is some runoff for the dams. We do ask for a lot don't we.
How did all of you fare? I suppose most of you will be on your tractors trying to get a crop in now!!!
:wave:
Posted by: inclement

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/02/2003 17:15

G'day FE, we have "Hobby", "Bourke" and "Collins" street farmers just like in the West, but our "Blockies" can not be confused with them - many are Soldier Settlement blocks and full-time, but not too big, farming pursuits. They did, for many years produce most of Australia's dried fruit, much fresh fruit, and now a complete wine district is based here - and now a lot of veggies are replacing grape and citrus. :cheers:
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/02/2003 22:33

I was away on the weekend and came back to 46mm in the guage over 3 days. I'll have to go away more often if thats the case.


BFTB

smile smile smile :cheers: :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2003 10:30

That is great news BFTB. I am hoping we havent heard from you Heather because you are too busy after the rain you,ve had........
It is wonderful to see everything shooting again, you would think after it was all so dead there would be nothing left to shot, but ther it is... cool
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2003 11:00

Hi Mcg, & good to hear from BftB again & with 46 mm! Still looks to be some more possibilities yet for a fair bit of the east! BTW Mcg when we had our big dry spell in 2000, the germinations that followed that were spectacular - natures a tricky act to follow some times!! At present we have a wonderful green look over here, but unless it rains sometime this week, it wont last long & theres not much forecast for down here for a while.
I got a bit worried last week when i heard the word "Fuel Rationing" & IMO if something is going to happen in M/East, it will have to be in the next 3 weeks or weather conditions will beat everyone for a while, so i spent Friday morning checking out fuel prices & then topped up everything around here, cos i can only see prices going up from here on - but i guess thats my conservative old age showing! Anyway i can't get 15%+ with any financial institution so thought i may as well try investing in buying fuel that i know i'll use !
Hope u all have wet feet....
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2003 11:09

Well FE your 'forcasting' was right last time so let's hope you are right again.
I would hate to see things get dry for you now!!!
Wise investment, Fuel, i suppose if they can put water on the futures market then you can invest, wisely, in fuel.
We are paying up to $1.07 per litre here, what about you?
I heard on the news that fuel could go to $1.50 litre. That would break many people. Imagine having to run a truck for a living!! We bought a Deisel vehicle some years ago, because Deisel was cheaper then, it hasent been cheap since. Not bad considering it is a by-product.
Posted by: Peto

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2003 21:56

We are currently paying 90c/L (bulk) here ATM, not too bad considering what you are paying MCG, although no where near as cheap as what it used to be.

Well, we have been more than happy with what received out of this rain event- totals for Feburary now stand at 150mm(6") at Killarney, and 225-250mm(9-10") at The Head. Wonderful rain, the creek is finally running normally again and with very little pressure on the pasture it has shot away really well. Hopefully we will have forage some oats in the ground by the 1st week of March, ordered the seed and just waiting for it to dry out so we can get onto it with the anhydrous amonia (nitrogen gas) rig and then plant.

Oat seed is fairly hard to come by here, bloke in local produce department rekons there won't be much around by late March/early April. It has also been said that there will be a shortage of weaner calves this month; although I don't know whether there is a lot of truth to this rumour-anyway you look at it cattle prices are going to be dear. Works are currently paying good rates for finished grassfed Jap Ox bullocks-we have a deck booked in at AMH at $3.00 to $3.25/kg dressed weight which isn't bad money.

Hope everyone has had a good dose of the wet stuff...how much have you had Heather and MCG?
:cheers:
-Tony
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/02/2003 13:29

Does anyone have a chaff cutter they would like to sell (single phase)?
We have been buying hay at $7 per small bale (cheaper that it was) but yesterday i had to buy some chaff, $32 per bag, i nearly died.
We are all trying madly to get a crop in the ground and it is showing signes of rain again, fingers crossed.
Fuel......today the deisel is still the same price but unleaded fuel is 3c a litre cheaper...i wonder how that price these things!! mad
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/02/2003 17:19

Hello all
Haven't been on for a while been earning a few $$$$$$ in town,looking after a motel
We ended up with 27mm of rain,our next door neighbours, 12 ks away as the crow flies had 125mm,go figure confused but it all helps & is a lot better than nothing
Hope all of you have had some rain,back to work tomorrow & then home for a week or two,catch up with you then
All the best
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/03/2003 21:40

I ordered 8000l of diesel just before the rain but they couldn't get out here then, finally got delivered on fri. We ended up paying 104.9 c/l. Fuel went up between order and delivery costing us an extra $320, just trying to sort that out at the moment..
:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

BFTB
:wave: :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/03/2003 12:57

Hi All, yes glad i did the fuel filled up when i did! All our green pick died last week with 2 40 degree days in a three day period - too hot for south coast!! Back to heavy feeding now, but not complaining, was just sad to see such a good germination disappear before our eyes, but it was too early. Looking for good Easter opening now!!!
Special request, could some of the grain farmers hope into "tell me all " thread & help Rainlover, i'm not a grain
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/03/2003 13:26

Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2003 08:01

unfortunately this has been our worst season since getting married and livung on the land for 8 1/2 years to dry to cut hay but have some left from last year its to late for us this year to grow any more grass asit is only days away from continual frosts and wet cold weather .i have 80 acres locked up but the first heavy rains will wash all the goodness out of it we are lucky though to be working and supplement our farm income .i have about 4 tonne of chestnuts still to harvest and sell through the markets not a pleasent job picking these up
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2003 14:03

Hi M/Man, yes i know the problems of deciding when to open up a good paddock of dry feed - leave it too late & it goes to mush, very tricky. On your chestnuts, do you sell through wholesale markets or growers markets? We went to Growers Markets 1 year ago, & was best thing i ever did, get paid on the spot, can tell customers about other products & dont have constant winging about what the price has dropped!!! Big plus for us i can tell you..
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2003 14:11

for the last five years we have sold 80%of our nuts to a big wine & chestnut day that falls on mothers day each year in sydney but as always they cry poor to us so in five years of dealing with them the price has dropped and we are sick of them so this year they will be looking for a new supplier .and being good for us this year and bad for most there is not a lot of chestnuts around.and yes you have read my mind we to are going to the growers market this year
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2003 21:19

hi fe i was wondering if albany has any history in gold at all and since this is one of my passions i hopefully within the next year will be able to have 2 months off work and doing some prospecting in the west will be my foremost objective. if you could shed some light on this subject for me being a westy yourself .it would be much appreciated thanks muchly brad
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/03/2003 03:59

Hi M/Man, back in the roaring 70's there were many red blooded West Oz's who either owned shares in mining company's or who went prospecting - i did both & loved it! - never made much money but it was a great time in our modern history, and a time i'll always remember with great joy. The closest place for you IMO would be Kalgoorlie/ Coolgardie = The Goldfields as we say. Go north young man (from Kalgoorlie) would be my advice. You would need to check with Kalgoorlie Tourist Centre, as i'm sure they would have a map of where you can legally prospect as an amateur. You have to be careful these days not to go on Company leases - in the good old days nobody was too sure who had what leases, there were pegs everywhere & nobody cared as they do today. I won't get really wound up here tonight or i'll never get to bed, but theres gold & good gemstone up that way (& millions of tonnes of dirt in between) i'll go for a hunt in the back shed for some old hand drawn maps i have somewhere if the silverfish have'nt eaten them & i'll send them to you if they are in one piece, but i will not be able to afford to "grub steak" you - that will have to be at your expense! wink wink wink
I think you will have a great time, but don't go there in the middle of summer - would also be my advice!
:wave: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/03/2003 08:29

you will have to enlighten me on what grub steak means have no idea. this is my dream to go prospecting in w/a and i need to do it before my kids go to school .however i am having my self on at presant as we have noone to look after our farm &animals and whenever i do have some time off work in which i am presently off now for two weeks my lovely wife has a list of jobs for me to do at presant i need to get my orchard mowed before picking .yesterday afternoon i managed to get out for three hours panning on adelong creek which was the largest gold producing creek in n.s.w picked up 4 little specks in one hour and drunk a six pack of melbourne bitter so i very happy
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2003 03:49

Hi M/Man, a "grub stake" (which i last nite spelt as the wrong "steak" shocked shocked ) is when someone provides the prospector with food & equipment in return for a share of anything the prospector finds! i have'nt got enough money to do that, so i'll have to let you keep all you find!! wink wink
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2003 08:01

thanks fe 6 degrees here at the moment and very light but soaking drizzle winter has come for the 2nd time in two weeks definately getting some snow in the higher country . do you live on the coast at albany or inland and what do you grow . theres not a great variety of things that will grow here as we are in a frost hollow and already 2 weeks ago lost all our pumpkins and tomatoes with -2.8 frost cheers for now im going for a drive to have a play with the 4wd in the mud or snow i can get up to 1500mts in the near vicinity from my farm
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2003 11:04

MM it sounds as if you live in a beautiful area. Is it very productive wher you are?
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2003 12:34

they say you could stick your shovel in the ground and it will grow. we have very rich granite soil here. unfortunately not much in the way of cropping can be done here as we can have a big frost any time of year. we even loose our chestnut crop every 2nd year or so.we are lucky enough to hav a couple of springs on our place that will never dry up so we plenty of water and the cows sold from the high country always bring money at the sales
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/03/2003 12:13

Hi All, another Sunday morning, weeks are going by so fast this year - lucky my kids don't look at WZ, (they get quite excited when i say that - i get the big lecture about time & management).
I don't know if the lack of comment on the drought is becos of the huge media interest in Iraq thing or what, but those shocking dust storms over east tell me things must still be horribly dry over a lot of Oz!!!! How are you all managing??? Seems to me that parts of Vic have been given a bit of a break plus some of Qld, but otherwise still very dry?? We have had 2 days of thundery stuff, lot of exciting looking clouds, but not much moisture, but the dry feeds gone now so feeding hay, grain & pellets to the deer, but the kyk is wonderfully green for the cattle - rotten deer pull all the kyk out in the deer pens so it never gets a chance!. Interesting comment here that is open to some debate i guess, but last 2 lots of rain - only around 5 mm, have been in storms with lightning about, i was just mentioning to my neighbour how "green" a lot of plant material grows after rain from storms where nitrogen is put into soil from lightning - wonder if there is scientific basis to this long held "bush" logic???? i'd be interested to hear any comments for or against & how you are all managing now...
:wave: :cheers: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2003 23:06

Hello there FE !
Hope you are getting some rain at the moment with events there as your cloud with thunder etc is over here at the moment ... was a very "biblical" afternoon with beams of sunlight streaming earthward, what moisture was there gave us about 5 spots on the hat.

Some towering clouds evident out towards the Snowies & tonight some lightning in the east ... Or is that Quest & Answer time in the Senate wink

FE it is my understanding rain picks up the N out of the atmosphere on the way down... just bet WZ Craig Arthur can ans this more approtiately laugh

Anyway, however it sure fires the growth up bigtime . One rain event seems to equal a weeks watering as far as growth is concerned that is for sure .

Around here we are back in the drought conditions again as that green strike is all but gone, however it is a plus to have water in some dams (tanks) again.

God , that word tank reminds me to say "thank you" for your update to the Evaporation Thread.

It seems all the symptoms of this drought are near done but it just won't go home yet .... did hear some bureau boys say on ABC radio yest it could go either way at present. So just to throw a spanner in the works I have been telling a few here it is going to rain next Weds ..... laugh
Byes for now FE ... mmm those B deer ! :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2003 23:39

Big, big HI Goody, your posting has really made my day! Yep thunderstorms all avo, little cells going in all directions & a front expected as well. Sitting here listening to a storm up Cranbrook way north of me - yes that N thing is strange isn't it. I can put wetta soil & urea on park lawns & water for a week and just keep it alive, BUT get 10mm in a T/storm & its as green as! Just having cuppa during meat packing nite, hope i'm in the rain at Growers Market tomorrow, & betting on a wet Easter! Salmon have just started to run this week & i had a great avo mid week, hooked 3 landed 2 - fantastic sport & some good feeds of fish... Well my good wife is mumbling about the i'net so must go - thanx for the post Goody & just hope you get some rain, we have had 5mm since 2pm today & i think we will get more, but don't expect this to be a real break.
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2003 15:52

great to hear you have had some rain FE. Hope it gets things growing again. Yes there is nothing like rain to make the place look fantastic. You can water as much as you like then it rains and the response from the plants is amazing.
:wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2003 19:55

Hi All, yes Mcg we got a further 5 mm overnite to make 10mm, further west (about 30kms got 25 mm) fine today, but may get more rain tomorrow. Have you still got green feed or not Mcg, there will be another shoot from this, but its still a bit early IMO?
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2003 21:36

hi just letting you know that whilst at work today in tumut we had the best thunderstorm that ive seen in this area, the hail was at minimum 3cm dia.its damaged the hospital and several shops dont know how much rain in it but i missed out again at my place its way to late now for us to grow some feed for winter. ill definately now have to buy at least 100 bails which as you know are$8 instead of $2.50 but you get that were we live hey, and who;d give that up for a million $ certainly not us. the one thing you know for sure in this life is there will never be anymore land made by whoever or whatever made this land
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/04/2003 22:05

Hi All ,
Seems my rain for tomorrow might be a fizzer but have not got into the depths of the pc models this evening to get up to speed .
Speaking of speed "Where is Big Willy?" he might be able to tell me why I have seen more willy willy's over this last week than at any other time of the drought so far...
I suppose Wingnut would say the moisture is back in the system & thus the thermals are firing up under the clouds ?
You know this means it is another sign that the drought is near over ...rabbits were breeding but the K virus hit & as it does not perform well with moisture I just wonder mmmmmm see you peoples :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/04/2003 03:28

Hi Goody, Did you get any rain?? We had 11mm from last weekends lot, north of us where they needed it more, got some really good falls 20 to 40 mm in some places! We have our second huge germination coming thru now "thick as hair on cats back"!. This close to Easter it should hold on now, also there is a cyclone up north which always throws a "wild card" in the possibilities package. Yes, you are right about K virus liking dry weather, came thru here in early December & knocked out nearly all our pet rabbits in the Park, & haven't seen one bush rabbit since Christmas & they were everywhere last Spring!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/04/2003 09:56

Hello all

Still no rain but we do have an increase in rabbits smile smile

Been pretty busy the last 2 weeks,David came off his motor bike & broke his collar bone in 3 places eek eek so everything that could go wrong about the place has laugh always the way isn't it

Our children have been coming out on the weekends to help us out, god love them,they are great kids.

I have just checked the 6-7 day out look & if that actually happens we will be in heaven wink

All the best to everyone,hope all is going well with you

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 06:26

Hi all.
I have been away, had to return to work to pay some bills...it was inevitable i suppose.
We have had some small amounts of rain and we have a little green pick but oour dams are at the desperate stage. Nothing we ca do about it but wait. Not looking very promicing..most of the farmers are saying we won't get decent rain until end April or early May.
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 07:22

-1and a big frost here this morning yesterday for the first time in ages we had 1 1/2mm of sleety rain that was not forecast however its all to late now for us to get an autumn pick
taking the kids down to blowering dam today for a picnic this dam usually holds 4 times the amount of water as sydney harbour and this is were ken warby broke the world water speed record right now it is 0.2% full
thought we'd go down there and take some pics as id be surprised if it ever drops to this level again in our lifetime
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 13:41

I'm beginning to think they will never be full again in my lifetime (lol) wink
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 17:03

Hi All, now Mcg you aren't planning on leaving this world in a hurry are you?? come on now, chin up, these are the bad times we all have to have sometimes during our life so that we can more easily measure the good times!! wink wink I'm not sure of much these days, but i'm certain it will rain again at sometime in your lifetime laugh - we are just wondering where Cyclone Inigo will go over here, it is a huge system & could bring a lot of rain in, but most likely to the northwest pastoral areas, never know some might even reach Heather, but don't think it will get to you Mcg, but winter rain will come! :wave: !
:cheers: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 17:21

Hi Heather, sorry i missed your earlier post about David coming off his bike! Now if it had been off a horse i would have said never trust those critters (i'm no horseman as you guessed) stop laughing Mcg, i'll play you motor bike polo any day! But David coming off his bike is tough luck - please give him our regards & i'll try not to write something really stupid that makes his c/bone hurt if he laughs! Of course i don't give any guarantees with my forecasts, but i recon you could well get rain this next week generally, as a wild card, it will be interesting to see where, when & how TC Inigo breaks up...anything could happen & you never know where moist air from that system might feed to....who knows?
You have just about been thru all known hardship Heather & David, but by comparison the next few years should be a breeze & i'm confident you will come through OK ...its just getting there isn't it? Sheep & wool prices are good once they have a bit of condition so that should be rewarding for you!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2003 17:53

Thanks for the thoughts FE
David said to thank you very much,
he is finding it very hard not to be able to do very much & having to rely on me more than he would normaly.

I am thinking of makeing a movie "Driving Mr David" laugh laugh as I am his means of transport atm.

I hope you are right about the rain,will just wait & see without getting tooooooo worked up about what might be wink wink

We went to Dubbo yesterday & it is so green along the roadside puddles of water every where
I am so jealous,but they needed it as well laugh Good for them & we are next wink

All the best
David & Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/04/2003 07:17

All those positive outlooks...makes me realise how much i get from this thread. Thank both. No i was only joking about the dams never filling. I know today is another day closer. I am sure it will rain soon, we have just begun roadworks on our land subdivision (help finance the drought) so that should guarantee rain.
I have been left on my own for two nights as the remainder of the family had to go away, i have woken this morning to all the poddy calves (now weaned) into the hay shed and the grain...they wouldn't dare do that when i had help, only because i am alone. What a mess...ah life on the land would we have it any other way????? Sometimes......i wonder laugh Just kidding.
Motor bike Polo...sounds like an interesting challenge...FE love to take you up on that..only for the social event though i would be truely hopeless..horses i can manage (just) but motor bikes now that would be interesting.
Have a good day all.
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/04/2003 14:42

hi all we should all be hoping for a game of water polo im sure fe might be having a game in the padock after this weekend heres hoping for you fe.
on a sadder note we are trying to pick our chestnuts at the moment and have been overrun by white cockatoos in the hundreds destroying our crop its the first time theve ever bothered us has to be because all there gum trees have been burnt and they are lucky enough at our expense to have discovered chestnuts. a lot of the orchardists around here have no problems shooting them but i [unfortunately for my bank balance]cannot bring myself to shoot them a couple of times ive been that mad that ive felt like it but manage to refrain from it
looks like ill be just letting mother nature take its course.
the money from these nuts gives us a great holiday every year so we wont be going to far this year
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/04/2003 18:49

MM
come up to the Hunter Valley, stay with us (free accommodation) and enjoy Wine country only 45 mins to the beach.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/04/2003 22:13

Hi All, MM heres an old trick we used years ago with parrots & figs - we spread grain all over the place & filled them up on the grain, danger is that you might attract MORE birds! Might be worth a try just in the corner of the orchard even if they have already done some damage just to see the reaction! Lot of rain in Perth today, but we have only had a lot of wind so far. How did you all go for moisture this week, looks to my untrained eye that some real autumn weather coming thru in next few days?
:cheers: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/04/2003 00:38

Hi All, Just a quick post, great rain right thru the Ag areas of the South West & Great Sthn!! I got to Growers Market early this morning only to see 2 tents on adjoining stalls blow over their utes, so packed up straightaway to happily forgo this weeks income & come home to sit in front of fire & enjoy 38mm of rain in 24 hrs... really great break that will see green feed power away for May! Hope it goes thru some more Aricultural areas of Oz on its way east!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/04/2003 13:05

well thats the best news ive heard all day fe i suppose you dont get frosts there so hopefully you will grow some nice winter feed bom here are predicting nice heavy rain for us tonight but my personal feeling here is that its another fizzer should be able to see something on radar by now but shes blank
ive got a mate down from syd but more of a brother so whislt the wife is in sydney at the easter show we are going to really get on the amber fluid tonight around the bonfire
ill make sure to have a few beers for everyone got a box of fire crackers,night should go off with a bang HERES PRAYING FOR RAIN CATCH YOES LATER
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/04/2003 19:23

Hi M.M. We are not allowed to have fireworks over here anymore, sadly against the law frown - but dont waste these precious little darlings on a booze-up, set them off when ever you see the cockatoos - absolutely ideal to frighten them!!!!!!!!
:cheers: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/04/2003 07:56

Hello all
Just thought I would let you know,we had 20mm rain yesterday/last night Nice steady soaking rain,just what the garden wanted,no run off to put water in the ground tanks/dams,but it was great just to sit & listen a watch the rain
Hope everyone is OK
David still having problems with is collar bone,two weeks to go before his next lot of xrays .Then we will know what is going on in there
Hope you all have a happy & safe Easter break,drive safely
:cheers: Heather
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/04/2003 07:57

had 5 mm of rain here over night another dissapointing system for us what looked so promising turned out to be a fizzer
im on a week off at work at the moment back on wednesday so as long as im home keeping cockies at bay with shotgun
i would so much love to just shoot one of the 1000 birds im dealing with here but conscious has the better of me and i keep firing over the head of these very persistant terrorists
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/04/2003 13:55

Hi Heather & David, Great to see you finally got some meaningful rain....could be a bit more to come in the next week.....fingers crossed for you wink !
Sorry to hear that the poor collarbone is not repairing as quick as hoped for, might have to get a second good book for David read - see if theres a title "The great joys of overcoming a Drought" and if there isn't one, theres a book for you to write Heather when things come good and you have some spare time to yourself again!!!
Lets hope the rain is the first sign of good fortunes to come for both of you - school hols should also bring a bit of relief work wise & the kids always get your minds on other things i find !?! Good luck-
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/04/2003 18:00

Hello all
Heather i am glad you have had some rain, we had 8mls. It is the most beautiful sound and i must admit i stayed outside and enjoyed it, got lovely and wet...i will never complain about too much rain again......
Like you, Heather, we need some runoff to fill the tanks and dams, very desperate.
Poor cattle, we have the unjoined heifers near the house, away from the young bulls, and although we feed them ,it has been so long since they could graze they are eating at the fence posts, where they can reach them, and ring barking the trees, very sad.
Tell David we are thinking of him and hope he is better soon, i imagine it would be a painful thing a broken collar bone.
Hope you all have a really great Easter, we don't make much fuss but enjoy a nice family dinner, looking forward to that. Don't eat too much chocolate.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2003 10:36

Thanks FE & mcg

David has gone to the river today with the kids & grandkids I have to work Sat,Sun & I will join them on Monday.We have some people who come here every year for Easter so they will feed the animals etc for us

I am looking forward to going fishing & spending time with the kids away from here for a while wink wink do us all good

All the best
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2003 11:30

Hi All, Heather its great that you can "get-away"
for a bit, traditionally we close the Park on Good Friday & have a big family fishing party that afternoon which usually results in at least one salmon - heres hoping, i'd like my daughter to catch one before she goes to England next month, in case someone takes her fishing over there for those river tiddlers!
Have Great Easter all WZ folk, where ever you are & be careful on the roads, better seasons coming soon!!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2003 16:59

Happy Easter to you all too...i will be thinking of you all. Happy fishing FE....
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/04/2003 07:19

we have about 25 guests camping up the back paddock whilst ill be working nightshift 7pm til 7am making heavy grade paper i hope our company usually gives us orders for heavy grade over weekends as it doesn't break at all hardly giving us a night of just sitting back and playing on the internet
HAVE A HAPPY EASTER ALL AND LIKE MYSELF NO MEAT TODAY IT KILLS ME BUT I DO IT FOR MUM
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2003 09:29

Hello FE
How are you all & things over there ?
Hope you had a nice fishing time of it & can tell us about that in due course.
Fish in the river here are still raising dust I'm afraid. Had a quiet time of Easter & this long weekend. See you later :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2003 13:24

Hi Goody, great to here from you, but sorry to hear its still dusty there in Wagga Wagga! Its school hols & we have been very busy (good for bank bad for nerves) good fishing but bad swell over Easter, lots of salmon caught but not by me mad , but thats the fun of it!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2003 15:29

Not many fish caught where we were but we had some great fun with the kids laugh

To top off a great Easter we had 26mm rain yesterday/last night

Dare I say it could be the beginning of better things to come smile Hope so

Best wishes to all
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/04/2003 01:55

Hi All, this is the last week of school hols over here and with the big Easter + Anzac long weekend period over, things are almost getting back to normal ie a cuppa & look at WZ at morning T time!!!
Heather it was great to hear of some followup to your rain of fortnight ago, any green pick showing & how is that collar bone healing? Mcg might have some more green for those animals now?
Did anyone else get anything helpful – poor Goody still got no water in the river for the fish, so rain is obviously still badly needed over there. We had another 26 mm last week & we now have an outstanding break with feed getting away well ahead of any red mite.
Another front coming this way later this week should see a bit more rain – again I hope it gets further east to help as well…
:wave: FE
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/04/2003 15:30

hi everyone
had 15mm of rain here on sunday arvo first good rain for a month and unseasonally warm weather to go with it actually have a nice green pick for cattle as we havn't had a frost for 10 days and the days have been getting to around 15 degrees
i travel to syd tomorrow to deliver 600kg of chestnuts to the wine and chestnut festival. that weve had in the coolroom then we can relax for the rest of winter.
been looking foreward for this tedious task to be over til next year . we had our first good morning fog this morning a sure sign of winter being just around the corner
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/05/2003 00:42

Hi All, May already & many still looking for rain!!! We had a hot finish to last week, 32 in Perth second hottest May day - second only to last years record 34 (29 down here) so i recon its fair enough to say we are in a "hot autumn" cycle as far as annual weather goes over this side. We have a good little development about to cross over the west coast in next few days that should bring some rain. The run off we had over Easter has almost evaporated so stock are back onto the troughs. Looks like SA & Vic & nth Qld might get a some moisture later in the week, but my untrained eye doesn't see a lot on the charts for inland NSW this week but who knows - forecasting over 4 days is a risky business even in Qz they tell me!
MM, please excuse me not knowing a thing about chestnuts, but was your 600 kgs as good as last year or did the poor rainfall cut the yield in number of nuts and/or weight?
Hope things are alright with Mcg and D&D, & i really hope some other members can soon report some green feed soon and a good enough rain comes to fuel up for cropping - we live in hope for you all..
:wave: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/05/2003 19:44

Hi all it is nice to be able to participate again. Work is really taking it's toll.
Rain...well we have had some. Our lease on the other side of our valley is loking great with a good body of feed. Home is another story. We have had some rain at home but not enough to grow feed for the animals or to fill any water storage. We have sent all of the cattle to the lease except the young bulls and the horses.
There is a lot of rain in the area it is just being very selective where it falls.
It has been cold and we have the fire on, very cosy, i love winter. No frost yet.
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/05/2003 18:54

I have just found out that there is a Growers Market that has just begun in Branxton in the Hunter Valley. It is being held once a month with the view of making it more often. If anyone is interested please let me know and i will get you some more information. Sorry FE i think it is a little 'out of your way'. However, if you do decide to visit you are welcome to stay with us.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/05/2003 20:57

Hi Mcg, you're right, couldn't get over there & back here in the one week eek leave that one for some of my associates in NSW (used to be a big outfit out Goodys way a few years back), but if anyone has any of their own produce to sell i highly recommend it as a very good way to go & i would be most happy to pass on a few tips by PM if needed. BTW Mcg did you get to the Polo Championships & if so did you & family enjoy yourselves or was that a different event?
:cheers: FE
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/05/2003 21:48

We actually had the world cup in Warrwick Qld last week. A very big afair but sadly we could not attend. Work commitments did not allow us to go at the last minute. Our son is not playing this year due to injury. He is needing to have anoperation on his ankle. His foot was turned backward in the stirrup while playing last year.
Good to hear from you :wave:
Posted by: mountain man

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2003 07:28

hi all

this was a very bad year for us
its not unusual for us to pick up 4 or 5 tonne of chestnuts most years fe but this seen us pick up only 100kgs of our whole orchard
so to make up the shortfall we went to a lot of trouble and expense to source 500kg of nuts elseware so we could honour our contract
but still this lady rings me up and complains some people in the cities are spoilt and a drought means absolutely jack sh-t to them.
they still get to wash every day and all the mod cons

hi mcg i would be interested in any feedback you have regaurding farmers market
thanks BRAD
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2003 19:18

Just a quick seasonal report from this end of the country.
We have finally conceded that the 'Wet Season' has finished. We were lucky on this place recording 7" in an 18" rainfall area. Lots of country about that only recorded 2" for the wet.This is after a very light wet last year. Many places on the downs country around here are destocked and I would imagine that by October, even the places that were lucky enough to get handy rain, will be very lightly stocked or destocked. From what I hear, much of the mitchell grass downs country of western Qld is pretty much in the same boat, and I believe that a lot of the Channell country is also pretty grim.
We are fortunate to have access to the live export cattle market which can usually handle almost all classes of store cattle, although our market is at it's best when you southern chaps are also competing for our store cattle.
So here's hoping you all get some good winter rain.
Posted by: LLL10

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2003 19:42

hi
Just a quick question down not out. I went to the Cloncurry Show last June selling my clothes and wondering if it would be worth going again this year. Do you think there would be any money floating around for the ladies to be interested in clothes,hats etc.
Enjoyed meeting everyone there last year but a long way to go for just a social occasion!

Thanks
Lill
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2003 21:38

Lill. I think a lot of that Cloncurry country got pretty fair rain, but some missed out too. Cattle prices have been pretty good, so the ladies should be able to buy a frock or two. My wife always seems to come home with heaps of gear even if we're stoney broke.
I'd imagine it would be similar to last year.
The Richmond Field Days are on about the same time.21 &22 June I think. Sometimes it clashes with Cloncurry Show. There is normally a good crowd there but probably not as good as Cloncurry.
Hope that is of some help
Posted by: LLL10

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/05/2003 07:34

Thanks down not out. Have thought of going to Richmond Field Days and then also Mt. Isa show but time doesn't always permit. Plus don't want to tread on anyone else's toes who already go to the field day with clothes etc.
Lill
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/05/2003 20:55

Hello All,
Just a quick update on David's collar bone smile

We have some great news he will not need an operation which is fantastic,he is back on the motor bike mustering for crutching. That is when we will really find out what damage the drought has done to our sheep numbers eek eek
Thanks to you all for the support even though we don't know each other personally it really did help & was very much appreciated
All the best & hope you get some rain soon

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/05/2003 22:32

Hi All,
D&D, that's great news Heather, hope David finds its a good roundup & watches out for rotten rabbit holes etc wink
Lil, Over the years we have had similar troubles to those you are concerned about - ie nobody (exhibitors) goes to a show or 3 or 4 (exhibitors) turn up & make too many for the show or not enough people to sell to! We always check with the organisers & ask for a list of exhibitors, & check numbers of attendance for last 5 years & we find WEATHER conditions ON the DAY probably effect results more than economic circumstances. So now your in WZ you have overcome that problem wink wink At least with clothing it's not a perishable, our products are & that why we TRY to get it right, & even then have experienced both extreme undersupply & oversupply but that's life, & we really enjoy direct selling.
:cheers: FE
Posted by: LLL10

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2003 20:08

Thanks FE for your advice. Yes it is a dicey way of making a dollar but I have been doing shows and field days for about 5 yrs. now and you seem to sort out the best ones to go to.
Have had an offer from someone to pay half the fuel if I drive to Cloncurry and take some of their hats as they are busy elsewhere and it seemed a good opportunity to go again this year because last year was first time there and took some clothes that weren't suitable for people there.
But it is a long way to go for me and now I'm also retailing from a store time is a consideration also.
But it's great to meet other people,isn't it? I enjoy talking to all and hearing their stories.
And also a good way to see a bit of the country.

Lill
Posted by: LLL10

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/05/2003 16:29

Looks like there's a bit of something happening around Richmond area, down not out. Wondering if you're under it if there is anything in it.
Hope so.
Lill
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/05/2003 21:24

Hi Lil,
We could see a few little scuds about yesterday, and today we heard a bit of thunder from some narrow storms. We ended up with a shower just on dark tonight. Probably about 20 points in it. That will probably do the grass more harm than good. They are predicting more unsettled weather tomorrow. A couple of inches would be nice, but I don't think there is that sort of rain in it.
Ed
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/05/2003 23:25

Hi All, good to hear there is at least a chance of rain for you DnotO, but can't see 2" in the charts just yet - we are awaiting a real buster tonite with a front, topical moisture, & low all linking up together off coast out from Geralton & Perth which should give a wide area of our wheat growing areas a second lot of rain in 8 days but will also bring some very,very strong wind!
Great to hear about your 5mm D&D, perhaps if you did Shearing & Crutching 4 times a year you might get at least 20mm wink wink
Probably be a long nite tonight, as i would just like to see the west coast radars flashiing away before i go to bed :rolleyes: Good luck with that unsettled stuff over there in the east - & some lucky SA farmers could get a bit of rain tonite from what went thru here on Sunday!
:wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/05/2003 07:37

rofl FE will keep in mind about the shearing & crutching wink

We had storms all round last night,lightning,thunder not one drop of rain frown

Looked good though laugh at least we know it can still happen

All the best,hope you all get the rain

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/05/2003 23:21

Hi All, just looked at BoM rainfall charts for last few days,week, & month & see a bit of moisture from nthern NSW southward - couldn't quite work out if Cobar got some or not, but MCG looked a possibility? Excellent conditions here, & mostly good conditions inland, friend of mine said yesterday that he had 3/4 (6,000 of 8,000) acres of crop in and soil was good. We had rain forecast from a couple of fronts for this weekend but didn't eventuate, would be good to get 5 to 10 mm again this week if someone has any connections! Hope alls well with everyone…
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/05/2003 11:49

Hi Everyone ! ..... laugh

Just had a look at the lightning tracker & you know it does not look real as there is not a thing to be seen anywhere on or near the map of Oz
Caught up on the reading here with the back pages so good to see what is going on in life.

Mountain man some yrs ago at the Henty Field Days some guys were selling bird scaring shotgun cartridges....these fire out a little mortar like capsule which exploded way out with a big bang. I think people on the irrigation rice country might use them for ducks , however these if not too expensive might put you up close & personal with scaring the cockies

I believe very much that we have to find ways to live with the wildlife but know these birds can be very very testing :rolleyes:
Mountain man a pistacio nut farmer near me had problems this yr with them as well.

This reminds me of a time when a stranger in conversation asked my friend what he did for a living to which his reply was I am a cockie. The stranger then enquired of me my occupation & when my answer was I am a cockie to he thought this to be "very funny !!" ...... laugh

Hi FE ! Good to hear about the lovely season you are having over there that moist soil must smell lovely ... forgotten what that is like .
I am feeding out my lupin seed for this yr to the sheep now

Must tell you this !
Just recently a cattleman up in the hills to the east of a little village near here called Illabo had delivered a B Double load of what could only be described as an act of desparation in feeding his herd. One trailer consisted of pumkins the other onions .... this is true !
Now the funny part about this is that the residents of Illabo since the delivery have been praying that the wind does not blow from the east for some time as this would result in making thier eyes water most severely.... they are sure !!! laugh wink wink wink

Byes for now to all with Regards :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2003 21:08

Hi Goody & All, Great to hear from you Goody, sorry there's not been any meaningful rain for you yet - must be very critical now & still in many areas of Eastern Oz. In fact there have been a few areas in the central and southern ag areas over here where seeding stop last week becos it got dry again - quite a few others are having a good run- just the luck of the game as to where you are farming! We are in Gods own country at present, got another 9mm yesterday & with 20 to 23 daytime temps have wonderful autumn pasture equal to last year - 2 good years in a row for us right on the coast - time to quit while we are ahead wink ! A friend of mine 37kms inland only got .5mm yesterday - it drops off quick at times.
Haven't heard from any others for a while, but see a bit of moisture further south from you on BoM rainfall maps - hope D&D are hanging in out there & MCG hasn't been about - trying times for many people. We should have another front Sunday nite & again towards the end of next week.
Had early morning with markets this morning, so will hit the hay earlier tonight - very best wishes all..
:wave: FE
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/06/2003 18:05

Hi all, hows things been going for everyone. Good to see your getting a decent season over there FE. I've been busy since easter with the cotton harvest and preparing ground, and trying to get 2 assignments for uni done. Finished residential school last week so i'm now finished that subject. A month off until i start again.

We had a dry may with 0mm, hopefully good falls for us soon. I don't think we'll get wheat in here again this year as the planting window is fast closing. Just hoping to get some good rain in the catchment of the dam and some good flows in the river so we can irrigate next season.

I think dry and dusty has had some rain but not much.

cheers

Justin :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/06/2003 10:54

Hello all
Hope you are all still battling on with this drought
We had 14mm rain for May,bit of green pick around but just about had it now,looks like the scenery will be red/brown for winter

Finished our crutching we had 4500 sheep in August now have 2200,better off than a lot of people I can assure you

We are going to muster our cattle in the next few weeks I think we are in a bit of trouble there eek anyway time will tell

All the best to everyone

Let it rain,let it rain,let it rain wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: droughtfarmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/06/2003 23:41

Hi everyone no rain here either although we have had a good start the air seeder has been parked for a week still got a third of our programme to go as we no-till the country got to hard those who work the country, most have finished or close to but the dust is comming of them with the strong winds.Anyway while I was fencing today in 14 c temp I tought to myself is it worth it? Another $150 000 dollars in the ground is it going to be like the last few? Looking over the land that once grew our best crops now turnig salt listening to the ABC wools crashed again, stripe rust, mosaic virus low prices for grain I just dont know where we are heading the margins just arent there to keep pace with it all.
Just the other day a good friend had a breakdown he has lost the faith of good years coming again
I am hoping he is wrong!
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/06/2003 08:45

So sorry to hear about your friend Droughtfarmer frown

Hope all goes well for you & him
Sometimes it makes you wonder why we still do this for a living doesn't it????
My husband say's it will come good again,so I guess we just carry on till it does
Keep on smiling

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/06/2003 10:19

Droughtfarmer I see from your age you are not to old yet to do something else but don't leave it to much longer OK ... you don't have to listen to the other farmers around you.

Looks like the next good rain is 14/15

It is the worst it has ever been here & by far.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/06/2003 11:35

Hi All, Just looked at BoM rainfall chart for WA last months & Droughty your just in the wrong place ATM as that finger of 5/10 mils runs in from the east & gets you, whereas nth & sth and along the sth & Esperance coast its a wonderful start - just how rain sometimes falls mate! If you were just bit nth or sth you would have it all in the ground and be thinking of that lovely heavy sound of grain going thru the elevators....Like Goody says, remember that your health & your family are what lifes really about mate - i've had a few directional changes in my life & i found the 40's age group a bit of a trying time - your still young enough to be ambitious but the body is often just starting to tell you to get ready to slow down...often causes some deep thinking & questioning. I'm a firm believer in "cycles" in both weather & prices - thats the nature of farming IMO. Friend once told me that every bad year makes good years look twice as good! Anyway what would a SOS (silly old sod) like me know anyway - just don't think you the only one who has doubts about lifes little twists & turn Droughty - we all do at times & we will all be watching these next lot of fronts - at least there not so far south this time!!!
Sad to here inland NSW is still so bad Heather & Goody, its a damned patchy year, and while those poor little possums get wet going to work in the city, a lot forget that much of Oz is way behind in ag production again this year. Hope you're finding the cattle have managed better than you might have expected Heather - the station country over here (except for little pocket in Murchison) appear to be having a good season.
:wave: FE
Posted by: droughtfarmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2003 10:25

Thanks for the kind words I know there is people in a lot worse positions than me and my heart goes out to them.
I think the goverment didnt help things with EC as it has created huge divisions in the comunity some getting it and others not. I was talking to a bloke who his too nieghbours got it, one brougth a holiday house and the other brought another farm he could not because he was careful with his money is that right or just good buisiness.
What I am trying to say is there must be a fairer way where everybody in the same spot gets the same help I dont think it is fair because I could tell you many storries on the abuse of the system.Droughts are terrible things and ours was now where near a lot of other places eg Kalanni/Koorda
WE dont need split communitys through these dificult times as some people are really hurting and just want too keep going, they should be helped!
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2003 16:26

Hello
I have missed you all very much. Sad to see some of you still struggling so much, my heart goes out to you, feel very useless when you can't do anyhting to help. It is almost past the point of needing rain, much more than just rain is needed at this point. Government should be ashamed of themselves, but i am sure they're not. There will be good seasons to come and i am sure many of them, it remains to be seen how many of us can keep producing though. We have people all around us in the Hunter Valley who are under the effects of the latest Milk Cuts and although one of our friends sustain five families on their property they cannot stay in the industry and make a living. Government must want all these unemployed people on benefits. confused
If it weren't for off farm income i know we could not have survived this one but i know we would have done much better if we had done things differently, fed the livestock much more economically and the like, still i suppose the best way to learn a lesson is from your mistakes and we have made plenty through this drought compared to the way other's have done things. But i suppose that as sure as i am that we will all have many more good seasons, i can't fool myself (this is Australia) there will also be droughts and we need to do what we can to prepare for that. Maybe we should start a drought strategy thread... laugh
Anyway it is really good to be back in contact with you all. I hope to be back very soon. Thinking of you all :wave:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/06/2003 21:16

Can someone from the Dairy Industry please Explain! ...... sorry Pauline ! laugh

I have in recent times delivered grain to drought effected dairy farmers who say it is costing them 42 c a litre in costs for feed to maintain their milk quota yet they are only paid 35 c a litre for that production .....that was untill this cut of is it of 3 c a litre was decided on by the powers to be ????
To my way of thinking it should have been put up 5 c a litre or am I just being to hard on the paying public for the privelege of having milk at the shops ? eek
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2003 01:04

Hi All, Yes Goody, since deregulation, the milk industry over here too has been belted. I've heard 450 down to 300 with 60 farmers on the way out! Producers are simply being screwed to the floor boards on price...our Ag Minister even warning that milk may have to be imported from the east but as you say they are losing money & this would mean higher cost to consumer to simply cover extra freight costs! The other thing becoming evident over here is the huge oversupply of grapes. In 2000 the Federal Govt introduced accelerated depreciation for vineyards to encourage Oz plantings to reach a peak figure by 2020. Surprise, surprise, the smart **** investment community got hold of the idea and set up "tax investment/minimisation schemes" and the plantings hit the target by 2002 - 18 years early - absolute madness!!! I've just got back from a trip up thru Great Southern & southern wheatbelt & some areas are really desperate for rain now, in some places it's hard to tell what's been sprayed & what's simply dried off, they must get rain in the next week or a lot will be lost. Some areas still haven't finished planting & there's no feed for livestock but luckily grain is still available.
Wouldn't it be just soooo good to see a reasonably average season right across Oz again!
Our boys have a chance of rain thru Ag areas over the next week so just got to wait & see!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2003 10:23

Hello there FE ! & fellow citizens of Aus laugh

Nice to hear from you this time FE

Just on the milk thing for a moment a friend this morning said this price cut was brought about to compete with the overseas price ....Is this something to do with playing football on that level playing field ?
Just don't get in the way with your livelihood it seems :rolleyes:
Damn sure no one in Aus would mind paying extra at this very extreme time of difficulty for dairymen.

Looking at the weatherfront coming into WA at the moment FE one could be forgiven in thinking the drought was about to break .... although the S.O.I. does certainly not reflect that frown

Anyway looks like you might be in for a ducking at least for a few days ...Just don't take it all OK ! eek laugh
We might get something to if this damn high gets out of the way .... I have a chuckle everytime I see the name raindammit online I like that laugh

Well, not much to report on of late FE it has just been more of the same so to speak ... light patchy falls with just enough for crops to go in here & there on "a wing & a prayer".

Oh ! & jokes aside about fishing one can see the bottom of the Murrumbidgee River at Wagga Wagga now going over the bridge & that is something I have never seen before

Be seeing ya at Hueys party hope all is well with family FE byes for now :cheers:
Posted by: Flame

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/06/2003 22:39

Hi FE and drought farmer.
Most people have finised seeding here,and crops are up and looking reasonable, some are a bit patchy but may be insects. Some of the area is better, some worse, but it is dry enough for the cape wead to curl up and look white and rye grass to go brown here. From what I hear it is still better than most places though. :cheers: Flame
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/06/2003 11:27

Hope we all get some rain out of this system
doubt it wink the way things have been going

No rain here since 19th May frown

All the best
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/06/2003 20:21

Hi All, What a rotten dry time you are having out there Heather, but wouldn't it just be ironic if you had rain on the last day of the financial year &/or the first day of the new financial year wink wink - but sadly i don't think it will be much... probably just enough to tease you yet again mad
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/06/2003 11:13

Great news laugh laugh laugh

Last night we had 19.2mm ,won't break the drought
but it sure put a smile on our dials wink wink

Heather
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/07/2003 20:05

Good start to july with 18mm in the guage. laugh Had a look around our wheat country today and there is a bit of moisture in the ground, only about 4 inches with no sub soil moisture. Start planting wheat over the weekend but will need follow up rain. Be enough to get it up but i think thats about it.

Cheers Justin :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/07/2003 00:14

Hi All; Good to see there is some moisture for you BoyftB - looks like things are starting to get going again for you up there! Again i feel a bit embarrassed to say again that it has been a wonderful season over here - i just let my animals into the last closed up paddocks of knee high pasture to get them thru to Aug & by then i anticipate even with slow winter growth rates, the resting paddocks will have some good regrowth - its been a warm & not too wet May & June - like spring actually. We have not had the big rains that other areas of WA have had yet, but more than enough for good pastures - we've had 23mm since Friday this time. Hope you get some more Boyftb.... hows everyone else going?
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/07/2003 15:45

Hi FE, After a light wet season here, and 80 points spoiling rain in May, we are starting to reduce numbers here now, as the feed quality and quantity reduces. We were a lot luckier than some, who have been destocked for 18 months now.
Cattle on this property are in good order ATM, and the market seems to be OK. We sold 480 No 2 steers and heifers today. Steers averaged $1.87/kg live, havent got heifer results yet. Have another 300 earmarked to sell in a few weeks time, and then 700 more in August if things arent holding up too good by then. Destocked by Nov if no rain.

I sold all my own breeders last week due to grass running out, and no agistment available. Sad thing to do, but after the last 2 dry years, I wasnt looking forward to another period of feeding them. Much easier for me to restock later when things are more favourable.
Winter weather here has been very mild. We seem to get a couple of cold nights, then a week of mild o/night temps. Then clouds build up and threatens to rain. Then cold again for 2 nights.
We do not want any rain now as it will only further spoil the grass we have now. Would be nice to get a couple of 2 inch storms in Sept followed by a decent 'wet' for a change.
Ed.
Posted by: Storm Watcher

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/07/2003 19:52

Here in our area, things are going great for a change. Winter has been very mild so far but moisture has been forthcoming. Crops are looking really good with potential for one of our best seasons. Crop stages range from early wheat putting a head out to latest planted wheat mid-tillering stage. Can't complain at all about the weather for a change with 40mm in June and 11mm so far in July. Keep it coming....
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/07/2003 21:09

no rain out of this front going just missed out by about 5 kilometers however we did get 11mm last week, this country is looking good for this time of the year. The old saying is storms in winter means tears in summer. frown
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/07/2003 12:30

19mm much needed ,much apppreciated rain yesterday laugh laugh laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/07/2003 20:33

Great news Heather, we ended up with 7mm last night. How windy was it over your way. Not much fun out fencing yesterday with strong winds coming across open paddocks.

Justin

:wave: :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/07/2003 00:07

Yes we had some very strong wind & of course a dust storm frown but that was easy to put up with once the rain got here,that rain could just get us into summer now,bit of green pick about so that will keep it going laugh

Pleased you had some rain even though it was not nearly enough laugh laugh next time

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: mcg

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/07/2003 14:49

Hi laugh
It will all end up OK i'm sure :cheers:
Posted by: droughtfarmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/07/2003 23:21

Well all Iam back wish i could say from holiday but the real reason is my computer blew up or something like that,anyway things sound like they have improved for most i believe there are quite a few still in drought.Talked to a dairy farmer from sail said it was pretty bad there and i believe bad winds cut crop off in SA.Things are good in the west now and I would say a good average season.By the way who wants to take a stab at wheat prices for the coming harvest APW $215 FOB is my guess
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/07/2003 12:16

Thanks mcg

Pleased all is going well for you

You sure do have to laugh laugh laugh
Things are slowly getting better I am sure of that,we are at least getting some rain in dribs & drabs which is a whole lot better than what we were getting this time last year

Hope everyone who needs it is getting some rain,just makes you feel that little bit happier wink

Sorry to hear about your computer Drought Farmer

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/07/2003 14:04

Hi All, Slowly the rain filters over Oz - what a long drawn out season this has been for so many of you - but good to sense a few more smiles each week!
I've had a rotten time with my computer - had probably the most interesting week of weather over the last fortnight and have been sat here with no computer (motherboard burnt out) & phone, electricity & electric fences (2 separate units) all got knocked out by lightning a couple of Sundays back... when we've had great rains, snow out east, gales & huge seas, & i was sat here doing the last quarter GST return manually --not my best fortnight!!!
Heather i tried to send u a PM & email with sincere appols for my misreading of that virus warning - hope you got one or the other, as i sent them from a friends farm & their systems about as poor as mine. This thing has driven me & my very understanding "nerd" mad over last few days, couldn't get a mainboard to fit the case, got new case, put it all together with my old hard drive & troubles continued! Got into WZ & couldn't access maps & models, the mouse froze on the screen & so it goes on - the things only just going now - takes ages to get some i'net paths to open etc & i think its only keeping going because of me keeping a 10lb block splitter next to the desk & threatening any minute to bury it through the whole system!!!
Anyway that's life, good to hear things are improving MCG, yes its strange this damned love of the land thing isn't it, there's probably a 100 better places to put your money but we seem to keep getting dragged back into buying a bit more - my only advice it to look hard for a property with a very good water supply & seeing the troubles that are emerging over river “water rights” over your way, i think i'd be looking for springs & soaks more than rivers?!? IMO water is going to be the key for any agricultural venture in the next 50 years, cos whether this is a weather cycle or whatever, blind Harry can see that we are in a period of very unstable moisture supply & its very hard to grow either plants or animals without water......
All that aside, its great to read some good news, as Droughtfarmer has said things are looking good over here now for a lot of the Ag areas – fantastic year for us here. Anyway if I disappear for a while again, please don't think I've got the “huff” or “dropped of the perch”, it will probably be a block splitter solution for this rotten PC – I'm not really a computer person, but find block splitters can fix a number of things when you are in the right frame of mind!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/08/2003 23:06

Hi FE and others. Well none of the rain has filtered over to this part of Oz, but thats life.
We are gradually reducing stock numbers here with trucks going out every week now. All going south to where the good money is for the softer type cattle. Live export prices have been a bit ordinary so far, so trying to keep the cattle suited to that market for as long as we can.
It's a critical time of the year now. We know we have enough feed to last till about October, and often we could expect storms in Oct, so do you gamble on the storms, and have good bullocks next year, or play safe and sell the steers a bit young now? We had to wait till New Year for our first storm this year, and Feb before we got any real relief rain. We have decided to lighten right off while the cattle are in good condition, and good money is available for them. Whether its the right decision or not, only time will tell.
Land prices have been booming here in the last 12 months. Downs country in this area, 2 years ago was selling for $50/acre, and today, it is selling for upwards of $90/acre($1500-1800/beast area). Hard to see how they can buy for that and make money, but I suppose people were saying that 40 years ago when it was $1.50/acre.
Hope the rain is not too far away for all of you that need it.
I was wondering why you have been so quiet FE till I saw you pop up in the fishing thread in in WZ, and that explained it all. Computer problems... Yeah right wink Hope they keep biting.

Ed
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/08/2003 02:44

Hi Ed, i really feel for you mate - i've been there before, & IMO nobody can tell you what's best - thats whatever you decide at the time under the conditions you are facing, but i agree with your strategy, get the numbers down & play safe. Becos of the cost of area behind the fence with deer fencing 1.8m over here, i used to run right up to bust point all the time then had a bad season that we didn't believe could ever happen down here on the coast, i tried to hang on, bought feed in at ridiculous prices, stock lost condition, nobody to buy them, i couldn't sleep at night......NEVER, Never again! I've been understocked for the last 2 years & haven't bought in 1/10 of grain & pellets that we used to buy, & this year i haven't feed out anything but hay - never had so much spare time!!! i've been very happy to forgo that extra income in that overstocking risk area ( & please note Ed I'm not suggesting that your over stocked). The lesson i really learnt was that as the stock drop in condition the cost of feed increased, & their condition just would not pick up enough to slaughter – every thing goes the wrong way.
Our farming year has been fantastic this year & ground is filling with water, pasture good & heavy all over the farm, but the tourist park is very quiet & venison sales to the restaurant trade is well down as overseas visitors are badly down.
I hope & pray that your October rain comes mate, haven't heard from Heather either, i thought this last lot might have given them some run off, but the map tonite didn't show much out their way?
Your land price situation is quite hard to follow in such conditions. Over here properties just keep getting bigger as people leave the various ag industries – in our area diary farms are getting hit now with the change in regulations. A big milk company announced a ½ cent rise (28.5 to 29 cents) per litre in payment to diary farmers today, & at the same announced that the retail price would have to go up 5 cents as a result??? Really shows who makes the profit from the rural sector!
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/08/2003 12:48

Hi FE,
Yes the poor dairy farmer is really getting a grueling ATM. We pay $4.30 for 3 litres milk here so there seems to be a lot of 'value adding' there somewhere.
We got 8mm spoiling rain last night. Not very impressed with a yardfull of cattle in the yards, and 3 roadtrains waiting on the bitumen unable to get here to load them. Fortunately the rain stopped, and the trucks got in this morning, and are now loaded and safely back on the bitumen.
Looks like we'll send more next weekend now as this rain will damage the grass.
I find managing the pasture reserves a very interesting, and challenging aspect of my job. In this area, we get just as many drought or light years as we get good years. Its a fact of life here so we have to try to work out the best ways to get through the light years, and enjoy the good ones.
I was reading through some old threads some time back and someone suggested starting a Drought Management thread. I think that would be interesting, because everyones idea of a 'drought' is different, and each individual enterprise has different ways of dealing with it.

Ed
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/08/2003 11:31

Hi All

At long last we have had some rain last week we had 46.2mm,best part was we had runoff & got our house tank/dam 3/4 full so we can now go off the bore water

We are still "grinnin" wink wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/08/2003 10:50

We have had another 32.1mm of rain out of this system

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Boy from the Bush

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/08/2003 13:28

Had 28mm lastnight out of this system. This will give the wheat a good pick up, it was really needing it with areas that are dead from lack of moisture. Very windy here atm but great to see rain

Justin laugh :cheers:
Posted by: Wishful thinking

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/09/2003 21:22

Hi all

It has been a long time since Ive been on. In that time it seems that everyone has picked up a little. I dont know whether to feel guilty or happy, August was very good to us and it looks at this stage that we may have one of our best years ever smile .
we had almost 90 mm of rain for Aug. which is highly out of the ordinary, We'll need one more good one though so heres hoping it turns up soon and goes everywhere its needed.
catch you all again one day :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2003 00:09

Hi Wishful, Yes the whole Ag area is looking good from what i hear, now talking about grain storage being tight this season that might even be a record grain year - what a wonderful problem to have to face wink wink The only trouble seems to be that pocket of station country in the Murchison. Anyway its great to hear you are having a lot better time up there, & the way the systems have come thru so far this year, i think you will get a bit more in September - its absolutely wonderful here & right up right thru the Great Souhtern, even though a few were a bit late getting going from Brookton east, but i was up there recently & they are right now.
Hope it all finishes off well for you anyway, & would be good to hear from Drought farmer, Flame & the others in between?
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2003 09:15

Hi all,
We are just hanging in over this way. The stock we have left are still in good condition and just holding with lick blocks. We will probably sell more this month before they start slipping. We are down to about 30% of 'normal' stocking rate ATM.
We have been getting excellent prices for the sale stock, so all in all, not too bad for a light year so far. But we are coming to the crunch part of the year, from now till first benificial storms. If we only knew how long that will be. :wave:
Posted by: Wishful thinking

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/09/2003 22:17

Hello all

Well harvest is rapidly approaching us over here. in the last two weeks the whole countryside has changed colour dramatically. I reckon 3 weeks will see us into it. The crops are looking pretty good, about the only thing I would have preferred is a decent rain about 2 weeks ago. Cant complain though we are currently waiting for oats to dry so we can get started on bailing. Ive never done much hay before so were hoping it works out. In the end i think we will end up with way too much hay for us to use, so I'm just hoping we can find a market for it. Anyway that is about the latest update, I hope the weather is doing what you want it to wherever you are.

bye for now :cheers:
WT
Posted by: tony m

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/10/2003 20:14

Hello every one :wave:
My name is Tony M from Menai (Sydney).
This is my first time on the Ag-weather forum.
I am 42 and even though i am a "City Slicker"
my soul is in the bush. My Parents and Grandparents come from rural backgrounds. My mother came from the Griffith district and her background were into broad-acre irrigation; specialising in rice(long and short grain) and other crops(winter cereal; barley and wheat) and also sheep/lambs. As a kid i used to love visiting the relatives there. I was nearly destined to become a rice farmer and my Dad was going to send me into a Agricultural College(at Yanco) I wish some-times i had of pursued it.

My Grandfather was one of the pioneers in the Griffith districts and the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area(MIA) scheme after the WW 1. with also other relatives too.(sharefarming etc)

As a kid i wanted to become a farmer or to become a diesel train driver.(Half the fun going to Griffith from Sydney was travelling on the train and watching the big locomotives; like the large stout nose of the 44 class or the bulldog 42 class locos)
In the end i become the latter option and joined the railways in 1977 at 16 and become a "trainee locomotive engineman" in 1980. I only stayed for another three years,(1983)and had the travel bug and went around Aust. for about seven years(on and off) doing all sorts of jobs but i did get myself a tractor-backhoe ticket and a truck licence.To stop a long story short i joined Telecom in 1990(for life and was looking for a country transfer)but got retrenched 2 years ago(2001) and now back on the railways at Port Botany as a shunter/train examiner.(My train driving jobs are over) but even so my "soul" is not really in this job either.

I would still like to buy a farm(maybe only a dream) but do not know how to start and i ask myself am i to old to start?? ie 42 years of age.
I probably like a grazing property and into sheep and fattening lambs(nice green hills southern NSW) because i think it would be too much over my head for cereal cropping etc.

Because i know next to nothing about the industry; how could i get a "start" into the knowledge of sheep lamb grazing industry?
Do they have mature age TAFE courses; or maybe a share farmer/grazier. How does the industry work these days?

Would any one in the industry would know (on the Ag-weatherforums.)

Thanks for your help.
Tony M MENAI SYDNEY :cheers:
Posted by: tony m

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/10/2003 20:17

Hello every one :wave:
My name is Tony M from Menai (Sydney).
This is my first time on the Ag-weather forum.
I am 42 and even though i am a "City Slicker"
my soul is in the bush. My Parents and Grandparents come from rural backgrounds. My mother came from the Griffith district and her background were into broad-acre irrigation; specialising in rice(long and short grain) and other crops(winter cereal; barley and wheat) and also sheep/lambs. As a kid i used to love visiting the relatives there. I was nearly destined to become a rice farmer and my Dad was going to send me into a Agricultural College(at Yanco) I wish some-times i had of pursued it.

My Grandfather was one of the pioneers in the Griffith districts and the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area(MIA) scheme after the WW 1. with also other relatives too.(sharefarming etc)

As a kid i wanted to become a farmer or to become a diesel train driver.(Half the fun going to Griffith from Sydney was travelling on the train and watching the big locomotives; like the large stout nose of the 44 class or the bulldog 42 class locos)
In the end i become the latter option and joined the railways in 1977 at 16 and become a "trainee locomotive engineman" in 1980. I only stayed for another three years,(1983)and had the travel bug and went around Aust. for about seven years(on and off) doing all sorts of jobs but i did get myself a tractor-backhoe ticket and a truck licence.To stop a long story short i joined Telecom in 1990(for life and was looking for a country transfer)but got retrenched 2 years ago(2001) and now back on the railways at Port Botany as a shunter/train examiner.(My train driving jobs are over) but even so my "soul" is not really in this job either.

I would still like to buy a farm(maybe only a dream) but do not know how to start and i ask myself am i to old to start?? ie 42 years of age.
I probably like a grazing property and into sheep and fattening lambs(nice green hills southern NSW) because i think it would be too much over my head for cereal cropping etc.

Because i know next to nothing about the industry; how could i get a "start" into the knowledge of sheep lamb grazing industry?
Do they have mature age TAFE courses; or maybe a share farmer/grazier. How does the industry work these days?

Would any one in the industry would know (on the Ag-weatherforums.)

Thanks for your help.
Tony M MENAI SYDNEY :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2003 00:06

Hi All, yes tonym that is a very interesting background & i can certainly understand how you get that "call" to the land. At first i was tempted to post you a PM in response to your questions, but i think the benefits of the forum are sometimes lost when we do that as often others can add something very constructive or give an equally helpful alterative view...
as a member of a fifth generation farming family, when i was young i was determined NOT to go farming, but at 40 yoa, i was forced by health problems to leave the rat race (& good income) & i gave into my "call" back to the farm - but boy it was hard & we had the help & backing of farming knowledge from both my own & wife's families...so from my experience, here is my advice to you.
Firstly, be realistic in what you are looking at from a financial point of view. At 40 yoa, you may still have a family dependant on your earnings, & while it may fulfil your dreams, going into something new might really test your finances - be careful. As an old friend of mine once told me, halve your anticipated income & double your anticipated expenditure - if the result is still viable you might do alright wink
Secondly, a lot of farming today involves heavy capital expenditure for both land & equipment - IMO grain farming in particular from scratch would be very difficult.
Thirdly, try to spread you income base & risk - my adult daughter has a boyfriend who is very keen to do something on the land, & after a lot of investigation, i have suggested to him that he look at aquiculture & specialty (exotic) fruit mix. My reasons for suggesting this is that:-
1) there will be an increasing demand for fish meat worldwide.
2) ocean fishing has a quickly diminishing future.
3) it is not as capital demanding as other areas of farming.
4) you do not require a lot of land, BUT will require access to a good clean water supply.
5) it is the type of industry that you can set up & run part-time whilst still working "off farm" but change to being full time as your venture succeeds.
6) it is the type of industry that can be run in conjunction with some other "small farm" activity ie specialty fruits etc.
IMO the future will see a lot of "on farm" value adding to the products from many small farming outfits - such as small packaging & processing, cheese, fruit processing etc. - ie: i did a small trial run of "brandied cherries" this year that worked very well from both production & marketing aspects.
7) try to have some off farm income source that is totally separate from your venture, this might be you or your wife working off farm at times or having some other small business venture.
Anyway these are just a few of my personal ideas - yes do some study either at Ag college or fisheries or whatever - not only will you learn, but you get to see how others are doing in that industry! my final word of advice - stay well away from adding tourists to your small farming operation - takes up too much time & capital (we have just been hit with 2 successive years of huge public liability insurance premiums which has almost crippled some of our operations).
i hope other members might give you some other alternatives - theres some well experienced graziers about here who have been at the game for a long time, some croppers (who might now not speak to me for weeks!!) and there are some who have taken the country life on smaller farms & i know have enjoyed the lifestyle, but have done it very hard to keep going - enough from me..
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2003 01:24

Hi Tony M,
I agree with FE that you want to work on the most pessimistic scenario when you are working out your cash flows etc. First year will be very bad for high expenses and low income.
Also, (up here anyway)financial institutions wont look at a high risk first farmer unless you have at least 60% equity to put into the venture.Thats property, stock & plant.
I have been trying unsuccessfully to get myself into a grazing property for the last 15 years, and it has always been out of my grasp. And now land prices here are such that it's just not possible for me. Things may be a bit different down your way though.
For me, having my cattle on agistment is a more realistic option. Far less risk. It fulfills my dream of breeding my own good cattle, but I dont depend on it for my income, more as a hobby. I have a bit of expendable income from my job, that is tax deductable if I put it towards the agistment bill, and if the cattle return a profit, its a bonus. If they dont, I dont starve or have the banks chasing me. If things get really dry and agistment isnt available, I sell the lot and start all over again.
It's not ideal, but maybe an option like that might be available to you if you can't comfortably get into a place of your own.
I think the Ag Dept(Pasture Protection Board I think they are called in NSW) should be able to help you with info on the productive potential of the country, and also with industry best practices for whatever enterprise you are interested in. If you look up their website, they should point you towards good reference material. Enough from me.
Posted by: tony m

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2003 19:32

Thanks fellas(Fine Elsewhere and Down Not Out)
They are good positive ideas and some down to earth advice.

I suppose if i get my own "spread" i will probably get a smaller one to start with and go from there. I realise the income won't be very grand in the first few years and i suppose this more of a semi-retirement(smaller income) or grazing property spread possibly for agistment.
I did a little bit of cattle work when i was in the Northern Territory years ago(after leaving the railways first time) with my senior cousin(Tony Doyle) who was managing a couple of large properties in the N.T. (Rockhampton Downs east of Tennant Creek and Mountain Valley east of Katherine). This was all back in the mid 1980's.
It was good for a working holiday but working with the large beasts inc. Brahmas was not really my "cup of tea"(great fun though) so i suppose i would rather work with the sheep if i wanted to do it fulltime.

I am now on the cross roads(or T intersection) of my working life. I could move out of Sydney and move up to the far North Coast NSW or sunny QLD but probably become a "vegie" up there and and my wife does not really do that(we have no kids though) or the other option is to buy a grazing property within 3-5 hours south of Sydney; and the reason being my wife wants to stay a few more years in Sydney(at her reasonably good paying job) and commute every weekend down to my "spread" till she moves down permanantly (and she stops working fulltime.) We would sell our home in Sydney(Menai) and downsize to a small home unit for her or even rent for a while.

I then would try my "luck" with sheep grazing(wool and fattened lambs) as a smaller income the first couple of years to supplement her income and my small nest egg which has been put away.(super& equity etc).I could also get some paid employment doing some seasonal/temp or casual work driving the tractors/backhoes or tip-trucks to help if needed (and probably have too if the finances get tight.)

But again this really a option thought at the time(maybe only a dream) but it would be much better than getting " dragged down in the mud" here in the Sydney "big-smoke" My health also has gone down a bit after leaving Telstra(2001) and i have toyed the idea with my local doctor GP and he said a "country change might really help you." Any suggestion from the doctor is good enough for me.

By the way; i have seen the trout farm up at Ebor NSW(betwwen Dorrigo and Armidale) and a great idea. Also have seen similar on the Sun. ABC "Landline"

Well Fellas; enough said, What do you think of my thoughts and ideas? do you think this would be possible or just a "pie in the sky"?? :rolleyes:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2003 00:56

Hi Tony, Probably the best way to find out if your plans/dreams are realistic, is to obtain the services of a Farm Financial Counseller. You can discuss with him/her your financial situation, and they have info on typical income and expenses for different ventures. They work out the viability of your proposal, and at the end, if its a good thing, they give you a nice bunch of documents(5 year plans, 10 year plans, cash flows, stock schedules etc etc) that will really impress your bank manager if you are requiring finance.
But, as in everything, some are better than others, and they can all make figures say what you want them to say, but it's you thats putting your head in the noose.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2003 01:31

Hi TonyM, yes i agree totally with Down Not Out - run your ideas passed a Farm Advisor, but it might pay you to find the area you want to move to & get advice from a Farm Advisor from that area, who should be really switched on to that local scene. Again as DNO says there are advisors & advisors, if you are going to get their advice ask them right up front what their consultation fee is per hour & what will they provide you with. The other thing that hit me was when you said about your plant operation experience, perhaps you might consider buying a good secondhand machine (say backhoe) that might be handy if you are starting from scratch with building etc, & might be a source of off-farm income?? - just an idea. If your wife can keep working for a while, that will let you try to get going without full exposure to the new venture. i also think DNO idea of leasing property to try your hand in a small way is an excellent idea - then if it works out, lease or buy more land - great way to tryout without too much capital exposure. i'd be very careful about borrowing money, as i can only see interest rates climbing in next 2-3years & we got hit with 17% in the 1980's & i wouldn't wish that on anyone.
if you want your dream bad enough you will make it work, but just take a step at a time - you've no doubt worked hard to obtain that money you have put away, take it easy & make a good investment if you can, if it fails you know what road not to go down again & move on wink It is a big decision to make, but in my book its far better to try than die wondering!
Anyway enough from me again - good luck.
Down Not Out how are things with you - any increase in your feed supply & how much weight would you expect those cattle to put on in the next 12 months?
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2003 16:12

Hi FE,
We havent had a start yet for the season. We ha a 2mm fall and a 4 mm fall a couple of weeks ago, but that just blackened the grass. We need a storm of at least 40mm to start this Mitchell grass growing.
We only have about 400 young cattle left here now, and they are still holding on Ok on Uramol blocks, but they are earmarked for sale very shortly if no rain within the next 3-4 weeks.
We have been fortunate to get good prices for the cattle sold so far. Most of them, including the brahmans have ended up in NSW.
Hard to say what an average 12 month weight gain would be here, because the seasons are so variable. I work on 120 kg/year for budgets etc, but thats very conservative. They exceeded that even this year.
an example for you: If it rained 50 mm tomorrow, and that was followed by a 'perfect' wet season, the cattle here now that are in good healthy store condition could realistically put on 1-1.25kg/day until maybe June next year. Then the weight gains start sliding until first storms next year. But after a good wet, if stocked right, the cattle(dry cattle) would still be in prime condition in November.
Problem is you dont see those perfect years too often. Also you could have a good wet and still be absolutely droughted in August through spoiling rain in the Winter.
Good to hear you are enjoying a good year over that way FE, and hopefully we will all be looking at green grass before too long.
Posted by: tony m

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2003 18:54

Thanks again fella's(DNO and FE;)it is some good practical advice to follow; in all of these suggestions you gave me

I am having my holidays from work(railways) in January 03(five weeks)and will do some driving around the Southern Tablelands and into the South West Slopes regions of NSW. I will try and visit as many towns i can and try and feel the rural property markets; and also talk to a local Farm Financial Counseller and try a locate the "Pasture Protection Board" to have a chat with.( I never even thought of these ideas; so great advice fella's laugh

Thank you again for your time; it is like neigbourly advice even though it is over 2000 kms and 4000kms respectively;"Chewing the straw over the back fence" smile
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/10/2003 11:54

Hi TonyM
We have a property out in Western NSW 135,000 acres.We have sheep & cattle,cattle aren't much work but the sheep need a bit extra attention

.The most important requirement is a sense of humor laugh laugh
I love the life style & the fact that we get satisfaction out of what we do.You will have good times & bad,just like in every other part of life
Best wishes to you
I hope it all works out for you
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: tony m

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/10/2003 18:48

Thanks Heather; Dry and Dusty from Cobar. laugh but his other income was the 90-100 acres of rice yearly. As a kid i used to go there every year(school holidays) and he told me his property was divided into six large paddocks for rotating the crops. Rice in one paddock and after it had been "stripped" leave the stubble and slash it for the sheep for a year then burn it off and sow wheat or barley with it and also sow clover seed with the super. In the next year when the barley or wheat was harvested he would then slash the stubble and have a "fallow" paddock with clover for the sheep for a year or two. I was very impressed as a kid and the importance of looking after the "land" he owned so the crops he sowed would not rob the soil off all its nutrients. I was "keen as mustard" as a kid to become a farmer and now on a large circle of nearly 30 years later i think i would try and finish that circle as sheep grazier; but who knows!!

As you said "Always keep our sense of humour" which i agree and i try to always look on the bright side of things; other wise i would not get anywhere in life and also a dull and boring life. :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2003 12:12

Hi TonyM
My brother used to be on the trains as well
He lived at Campbelltown

I read your story about the trip to Broken Hill,that was the last big rains we had out this way laugh (just joking)

We still have the long ore trains that come through Cobar to the mines,amazing how long they are & imagine the weight those engines are pulling on the return trip when they are loaded

Hope all goes well with you
Heather laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2003 17:30

Hi Dry & Dusty, saw on landline last Sunday that there was a good drop of rain out there the other week - was wondering did any get out your way & how are things looking? these rainfall figures can be a bit misleading at times, as we had a "mini" cloud burst this morning & got 4mm in about 2 mins, yet the official site which isn't far away from us has no reading showing!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2003 21:12

We had 3.5mm on the 15th FE
Not a thing since then,well nothing to measure
Starting to dry the green pick off very quickly now,but that is always the way once we have a few warm,windy days
Won't be long until summer is with us & then we will see what happens rain/storm wise
We have enough feed to get us through the summer which is a big difference from this time last year.......after that we will just have to wait & see

Hope all is going well for you
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Wishful thinking

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/11/2003 12:17

Hi all

Good to see someone else new on the scene Tony m, Ive only been on for about 6 months. Well she's all go up this way, harvest is on and with a week of HOT weather there is grain flying everywhere. Mixed reports on yield and quality from here and some real horror stories from elsewhere. All things considered i think we will deliver something like 3 or 4 times what we did last year.

Its a good feeling, I,m not working today because we filled everything up last night and cannot do anything until we get rid of a load on monday morning. It looks like we might average around 1.8 t/ha.

I'm hoping the eastern states people are going to have something to sell but thing dont sound that rosy there. Anyway must go see you all again one day

WT :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2003 19:26

Hi all farming folk & others interested in the land, Merry Christmas & Happy New Year - where did this year go? Seems just yesterday we were sharing last years festive season. Sad to hear that parts of East Oz are still battling. Things are very good here & without stealing anyone else's thunder i recon a lot of areas of WA are looking quite good. Up in the Great Sthn where we used to farm our old next door neighbours property topped our best ever crop this year at 18.5 bags pa average of wheat! down here on the coast we have huge amounts of feed & have just finished the last hay baling last week - 6 weeks behind usual finish! anyway this year we have all the family home from overseas, had wonderful lunch & i have just finished shelling the yabbies for our traditional Christmas supper. weather conditions are all to boot over here ATM 3 degrees below normal Dec average, above average rainfall up to Dec, but cooler, but under average rain for Dec - very strange....
I know 2 of my old WZ mates are battling a bit one way & another, & I hope 2004 might just be a bit better for you both - & I just wish you could all get a few reasonable seasons again – hang in there folk, I'm sure its all a big cycle, just be a bit handy to know when its not “uphill” all the way!
Very best wishes to you all & God Bless..
:wave: FE
Posted by: David

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/12/2003 23:22

Did hear the other day the Grain is expected to reach 38 million tonnes this year compeared to about 18 million tonnes last year. laugh

How our the others farmers on hear going,
How much has your havest been this year?

David smile
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2003 19:54

Hope everyone has a safe & happy New Year
All the best for 2004



Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/01/2004 15:40

A bit late but a happy new year to everyone 03 would go down as our dryest year, even worse than 02 . Water is our biggest problem now, we have one dam left with water in it, I take a truck load out every week for the cows in the big paddock. I think things are coming good we had 16 mills yesterday and it is raining now beautiful rain, the first this year, looks set in for the rest of the day.Here's hoping.From Dundas near Fernvale :cheers: laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/01/2004 22:49

Hi Joe , good to hear from you again, especially when you have finally got a bit of rain!!! BTW you were right about that tractor problem of mine, rotten fan was the wrong one, the correct fan was in fact 2 separate blades that sat at 90 degrees to each other to give a 4 blade fan and sat 1" further back - we had twisted the engine cover back at sometime & when the front end loader arm hit the cover fractionally it pushed the radiator back too far. Put the right fan blades on & we have 1" to spare - even if i do misjudge something now & again wink
Heather is "reddust" better or worse than being "dry & dusty" - hows it going out there, i wondered if you might have just got a bit out of the system that went thru Giles last month?
Very cool year here so far - lots of feed & plenty of holiday trade in the Park & with us all in good health we very happy with life wink
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/01/2004 12:16

Pleased you are getting some much needed rain at long last Joe,hope it rains for the rest of the week for you laugh

Still Dry & Dusty here FE but thought a change was in order wink
We had 26mm in Dec didn't break the drought but it was better than nothing
Good to hear all is well with you & the family

Heather :wave:
Posted by: kelpiecross

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/01/2004 21:49

drought or climate change? There is mounting evidence that the climate is changing. Ice shelfs are breaking off the Antartic, Glaciers are retreating back up into the mountains.Europe is experiencing extreme heatwaves,and the world is having more frequent and more extreme weather. All the predictions that weather scienctists have beeen forcasting for some years now.What are we to do? How will we manage these changes.I know that here in southern Victoria where we are use to 600 700mm , it is quite challenging. Nearly all our dams are only 1/3 full and most bores are well below average or gone dry. Ballarat city has only 30% capacity and falling fast. Imagine the effects on industry if there is limited water?I know I sound pessimistic but we have to pepare for the worst scenrario
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2004 01:20

Hi kelpiecross, & welcome to the slow backwaters of WZ (ie the Ag Forum) wink yes there has been quite a few posts on climate change in this forum - u might like to have a look at another thread in Ag Forum on "using Water Table for drought prediction" (or headed something like that) has a few interesting comments in there also. The debate seems to be is it a "cycle" of weather generally or something more serious. Regardless of what it is - its been effecting us over here for the last 15 years - the last time my big dam overflowed 2 years in a row! But this last 12 months has given a good rain at very helpful times to give our best season ever in 28 years on our property. This summer has been particularly cool for us on the south coast, which is what they are predicting for us warmer winters & cooler summers which will give us a bigger growth period simply becos the actual change of timing for when it rains.
Check your "private mail" over the next few days & i'll send u a bit of other info.
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2004 08:23

Hi All,
Well we are finally getting some useful rain up here. I have guaged 102mm here since Sunday, and forecasts of more to come over the next few days.
We trucked more cattle out early last week, and now have only about 100 head here. At least the grass will have every opportunity to respond & establish now, with no grazing pressure.
Hope the rain gets down your way very soon Heather and others in NSW.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/01/2004 10:54

Hi DNO

We had 17mm of rain yesterday it was great our neighbours had 290pts & fences down everywhere
Heather smile
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/01/2004 22:56

Hi Red Dust good to here you have had some rain, I think you will get a bit more yet with the low coming down the inland lets hopeso. We have had over 100 mils since Saturday good soaking rain,but not enough to make the creek run just shows how dri it is.Green grass every where.I'm glad F E is having a good season, must be time we all had a run of good years ahead,mabey we will.
Joe :rolleyes: :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/01/2004 16:08

Thanks Joe
We had no extra rainfall
What we had was great though
Pleased you had soaking rain & not storms ,as sometimes they add up to extra work,like miles of fencing eek

Heather smile
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2004 01:37

Hi All.. well here it is June already, great season again here on the south coast, lot of crop in the ground thru the wheat belt now, eastern section of Great Southern & parts Eastern Lower Great Southern were held up by no rain, but the reports i have suggest everyone has got started out there now...Flame might be a bit late out his way??? Anyway we have the climatologist from Ag Dept being a bit careful about what they see as the finish to the season ATM. See things are dry again in a lot of eastern states but some good showers got thru last week - whats happening around the place - hows things in Wagga and out that Red Dust way, is the rain we see helping Vic footy teams get the odd win getting out to the farming areas ???
Good time to get & put next years firewood away i recon - i always like to be a year ahead as its amazing how much better & hotter wood burns when its been cut a left a while i find & i have a great fire going tonite to encourage me to sit at the computer wink
Trust you are all still surviving where ever you are :wave: FE
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2004 19:11

Hi F E good to here from you I have been very quiet lately. Still recovering from my hip replacement, don't let anyone tell they are a brese, it takes a lot out of you. I managed to get my leg over the stock bike today for the first time. The doc has told me I have to get the other one done also,not looking forward to it.
The country up here is looking good though a bit dry,we have got a good body of feeed in the paddocks, and should get through the winter very well. Cattle prices are very good too,glad to here you are having a good season also. :cheers:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2004 23:16

Hi FE,
Things are not too bad here so far this year. We ended up with abt 9" rain(ave 18"), and that grew a light body of grass, and the stock are doing really well. We partly restocked in Feb, and we should see the year out without destocking again, but it'll be nice to see some good storms in about October.
Good to hear things are looking good over there.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/06/2004 02:05

Hi Joe & DnotO, good to hear from you both.
Glad that hip is getting better Joe, if you get them both done i recon you might be in the Masters Olympics in 2008! smile They threatened to do my knee, but i was fairly stubborn about it, so doc said either lose 3 stone (20% of my body weight) or its the op! i've taken off 4 stone & feel really good and the kneee is managing a lot better for now!
Gee DnotO your still not really over things there are you with 50% of rainfall - i guess with the lower stock numbers not built up again it makes things easier even if the bank account suffers a bit. Still from my experience i'd sooner have less money than be awake all night worrying about where the next mouthful of feeds going to come for the livestock wink
Good luck for to you both :cheers: FE
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2004 12:02

Have any of you farmer folk ever used the package 'Australian Rainman'? I have bought it to analyse the historical rainfall data it contains and the likelihood of rain given differing patterns of the Southern Oscillation Index, which interests me perhaps more than any other aspect of meteorology. But its biggest use is for farmers or others on the land who need to estimate what rain to expect so as to make agricultural and crop planting decisions.

I just wondered if anyone has used it, how did they like/dislike it?

:cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/06/2004 20:48

Hi Keith !

I am just wondering where in fact you are in N.S.W. as your location is a newy to me !

However I have not ever used the program you enquire about but can't but help wonder if any of these programs are up to speed with what is happening with our climate change.

We seem to want to keep looking back to data collected for answers but I wonder in fact if any of it is relevant now.

Are we in drought now ?

Or this just a normal year for the way the weather is changing ... it could well be that next yr is going to be more of the same ?
If you look at the latest S.O.I. figures the see-saw is on the way down again from this winters reprieve to being dry.

Is there any substance to the theory that the hole in the ozone layer over Antartica is causing a vortex resulting in rain bearing activities to be further south than ever before ?

If this is so how could any program be relevant ?

I tried to source some studies that I know came out last year from a University on Indian Ocean Climate Change & Aus Climate Change but could not get any leads on it.

So what does the program say Keith ?

Good Luck with it & maybe you could give a posting later on your outcome

Here ATM the grass is growing & dry sown crops are up after recent rains...no sub soil moisture yet to give breathing space. Maybe it is enough to stop further dying of mature trees becoming evident on hill areas which I have never seen before in living here all my life

I liked the picture in your profile Keith ...very good ! laugh & likewise :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2004 16:45

Hi. Keith
No I have never used the Rainman,I am a bit like D.N.O.I believe the weather we have been getting the last 14 years is the norm. I :rolleyes: n other words the way it was 200 or 300 years ago,and the rainfall we have been used to the last 200 years has been above average.When South East Queensland was first settled the hills and mountain ranges around here were treeless, and to my knowledge it was never cleared by People.Mt.Coother used to be called one tree hill, it is now covered in Eucaliptus trees the same as all the other hills in the area, Question 1 why were all the hills and Mountains treeless then and why are they covered in trees now, it has to be more rain than usual the last 200 years.I hope I am wrong about this but it is just a thought I have in my mind.
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2004 19:31

Hi Goody and Joe,

Firstly, Goody, my location is a suburb about 40 kilometres northwest of Sydney.

The program is a software package put out by the Department of Primary Industry in Queensland. It doesn't address the 'greenhouse effect', it uses historical rainfall and SOI data to predict the likelihood of future droughts and floods.

You can read all about it here:
http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/rainman/

There is a theory going around about the ozone hole causing the upper air temperatures to be colder and the jet streams more intense, thus affecting the rainfall. I haven't read a lot on it but like the 'greenhouse' it is only a theory, for the reason that we need a lot more data and improvement in our modelling before we can confidently make some of the more extravagant claims you hear from some people. I'm not going to start or get involved in a climate debate here; there are plenty of other threads where people, including myself, have had their say on it.

Back to the subject at hand: I haven't done a lot of work with the software as I'm still coming to grips with it. I have the professional version which contains rainfall data from 3800 Australian and 9000 international rainfall stations, as well as some temperature data.

I have plugged my own data into it and I am presently constructing a spreadsheet in Excel which takes the data the program generates (you can copy it over) and tries to put the analysis in one place.

The software uses 2 statistical procedures, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Kruskal-Wallis tests, to determine whether rainfalls during different phases or states of the SOI are significantly different from one another. The probabilities of the median and other deciles of rainfall are worked out, and the likelihood of rain in the future determined. I am also carrying out these tests independently myself on the data to draw related conclusions not specifically addressed in the program.

It has a heavy emphasis on farming needs, you can do an analysis to see whether you should buy cattle or plant crops, there are numerous tutorials as well.

That part of it was irrelevant to me but I was interested not only in the data from all over Australia and the world (including the world's wettest place, Cherrapunji in India), but also in being able to tell when we might get spells of heavy rain or dry spells, especially given Sydney's dwindling water supplies. The program did tell me that Kings Langley has been in moderate to severe drought now for 2 years. Some parts of Sydney of course are semi-rural and so it would be interesting for people there as well.

When I can look into the program more, and develop a systematic approach, I will hopefully be able to put some results up on my website.
:cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2004 22:33

Hi to the Marshall & Keith with the pipe !

Very interesting reading both your postings

My responce is Keith that what you are doing sure is interesting so will be wanting to follow your progress with it all for sure !

I am intending to set up a Davis weather station sometime soon on my little patch of Oz so that could be a reference point for you despite perhaps being under the umbrella of the Forest Hill Weather Station at Wagga Wagga .... ha so take the middle road if gleaning any figures from here.

Joe .... It sure must have been very dry here at one time as I have come across quite substantial sand hills only 1 hrs drive to the west of Wagga Wagga at Narrandera ... this rather surprised me as I did not know they existed.
Mind you they only seem to be located adjacent to the river on the flood plain area for some reason ?
I have had to drive a laden semi-trailer over one such hill in recent times delivering fertilizer to a farm & was so surprised by the drama of it all ...God ! nearly got bogged so took a wide berth next trip or two I can tell you !

These sand hills appear to be of the wind blown type & are randomly placed it seems...but so high! maybe 15' or so.

Would like now to relate this story to you both re the weather this yr :

Last school holidays (wife is a school teacher) we came home from a Victoria Lakes Entrance break away via the Snowy Mountains Hwy & stopped at Nimmitabel to stretch the legs. I chanced to wander into the local Saddlery shop which to my surprise by evidence of what was presented is catering more for the Harley Davison horse riders these days than the descendants of the Men from the Snowy River. Anyways there-apon a local man of the land came in to discuss the finer points of the next mornings Anzac Day ceremony with the man of black cycle leather. I was both amused & delighted by the how Australian this all was of course !
A conversation was struck up with this out of towner maybe because of my hat being a Silverdale Cheyenne who knows but it was reported with some deep despair that this is only the third time in the towns history they were out of water.

First time being in the late 1890's when Nimmitabel was first settled ... everyone had to up & leave to go back into the mountains.
Second time was in the mid forties
Third time now

This young battler of the land said the last 16 yrs there have been no good ...so what do you reckon bout that Joe Marshall ?

Cheers for now with stars bright & frost tonight laugh :cheers:
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/06/2004 10:20

Hi Goody,Joe,everyone,

Firstly let me assure you I look nothing like that man with the pipe! laugh laugh laugh In fact that gentleman was a former Headmaster of St Custard's Boys' School in England (a fictitious invention that is a send up of the British school system in the 1930s-1950s). The original caption under it was: 'The boys all look upon me as a friend.'

Anyway..thanks for sharing that information about the water supply. I will have a look at the Wagga Wagga area in the program and see what it tells me and post the results.

I have a Davis Vantage Pro weather station and am very happy with it.

Thanks also for your interest in the whole thing generally, I will certainly put something up for all to see. I may even do a regular 3 monthly report of some kind, although you can already get that from other sources. But those other reports, to my knowledge, don't spell out situations for individual geographical areas, except on a state-by state basis.

I need to look deeper into what the program can do but I know it does look at whole areas (say weather climatic districts) as well as single locations. So I should be able to put something up a little more specific to individual places or areas. But it will be a while.

Perhaps I should have been a farmer myself...oh well..
:cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/06/2004 15:56

Passing by this place called home !

Home from Melbourne today but on to Gosford tonight Port Kembla tomorrow then Wagga Wagga & back to Sydney straight away before the dawn. Not much time for farming Keith which reminds me why I have replied....

Our two Sons are living & working in Canberra because of hearing the latest on child abuse ...
"Leave the kids the family farm !"

Hope this then makes my posting as Agricultural...So, I am sure you have not missed a thing Keith !

Here's custard pie in your eye & thank's for all the info !

Ciao amigo :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/06/2004 02:23

Hi All, Gee this threads got interesting while I’ve missed a day or 2! Good stuff Keith & great work, sorry but my PC skill is battling to get me hooked up here let alone run any other programs! Lost everything last night & had to wait for my good wife to get all the bells & whistles going again today shocked
Joe's details going back in 100’s of years is also very interesting, but one of the reasons why I like looking at Oz weather history, is becos “white” settlement has been in historic terms very recent (200years) weather records much less. In that short span of time I recon we “Europeans” have buggered things up fairly well, as I recon what we have done in land management has had a “local” effect on weather. Now before you think I’ve flipped & should be heading for the big retirement village in the sky let me explain, that by locally, I mean that I am a firm believer that vegetation helps rainfall happen if conditions are borderline. No doubt some smarter people than me can show this is a load of tripe, but I’ve noticed over the years that given a district with heavy tree vegetation you get a drop in wind speed, heavier moisture at ground level (and below) seems to set up a little “mini environment”. Areas in this neck of the woods used to have drizzle hang round for hours some days, now with so much open country just a bit of wind speeds everything up & its gone a lot quicker?
A few of you will have got fed up with my little story of our families 5 generations of farming history in Oz but here it is again – previous generations find great land area, clear all the land, farm the daylights out of it, now fighting salt & spending hours planting trees….. my father told me how as a kid in the 1920’s he used to catch freshwater fish in a stream on our old wheat belt farm – today its salt as the sea and nothing lives in it- all in less than 100 years!
Global warming is a fact of life & if an old goat like me can see it I have to feel sorry for those who can’t. What I don’t know is if it is a weather cycle or something caused more by the ever increasing habitation of the earth? I saw an interesting program on TV a few weeks ago about how a cold Atlantic deep sea current had disappeared causing a lot of trouble for fish, micro plankton, & whales – claims that it also had effect the weather. As I’ve said before our local water temp down here is all over the place in recent years and fish are not a plentiful & species are changing with warm water fish down here where they shouldn’t be… really makes me wonder what is ahead for future generations, cos if this is mainly manmade I can’t see it being reversed quick enough!
Anyway back to the real world – goodness me Goody are you running a travel business….making my head spin with you interstate schedule, why couldn’t you hop over here while your at it for a cuppa on Sunday … was interested to learn that you good wife was a "chalkie" – so’s mine – prime requirement for any farmer I recon as her off farm work has been a great help for us more than once or twice in our 30 some odd years of marriage!!! wink
:wave: FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/06/2004 07:58

Hello All
I am not a farmer, but have spent many years of my younger days on a property near the old Adaminaby, NSW (sheep), so I am very interested to read all you have to say. I have never really bothered with the Agricultural thread because I thought that I wouldn't know enough about the discussions to join in and I still don't, but I really love reading all you have to say about the past and your daily lives. Hi FE! Long time, no see! Good to hear from you again. I was beginning to get a little concerned. I'm a chalkie too. Teaching Adult Literacy and Numeracy these days.
Gabby
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/06/2004 23:18

Big Hi to you Gabby, & u don't need to know anything about farming to join in this thread, most farmers i know will "chew straw" over the back fence with everyone given a chance smile Now how did a nice young lady like you miss marrying a farmer i wonder Gabby - & BTW did you do any teaching whilst at PH? Teacher friends of ours (around 55 yoa)have just come back from doing 2 years teaching way, way up north, apparently by going up there he added a few levels of seniority so that when he retired he would be on a better super level - smart move i guess!
Back on this water thing, on our WA TV tonite (7-30 Report -guess u get same program on east coast)had a story about how the last 5 dry years Perth has experienced are now moving east - so big water problems for east coast southern capitals just starting so they said eek
The official figure quoted for Perth was 20% reduction in rainfall over the last 30 years!
Food for thought - :wave: FE
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/06/2004 11:30

Hi guys,

Care with the use of statistics here.

I don't know exactly what location in Perth (the BoM, or an average of all the Perth stations or some other location) the ABC was basing its figures on but I just ran some quick tests on the Perth Airport data. The average annual for 1974-2003 was 740mm. The average for the entire dataset (1877-2003) was 824mm. This represents a negative anomaly of 10.2% . The annual average from 1877 to 1973 was 849mm. The 30 year moving average over the entire dataset has dropped from 830mm to 740mm, a drop of 10.8%.

Using the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric procedure on the data for the 30 years ended 2003 compared to the entire dataset, there is a 98.85% probability that the difference is due to climatic factors and not chance.
:cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/06/2004 15:50

Hi All
We have had some rain at long last ,enough to get a bit of a green pick growing for the sheep & cattle to have a bit of a chew on.
Still in drought here though & hope this is not just a teaser like last year

Talking of Chalkies I am currently studying to be a Teacher's Aide for Special kids & I am really enjoying it.I will have something to do when we sell this place & move into town
Any one want to buy a sheep & cattle station lol
wink
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/06/2004 21:38

Hi Red Dust good to here you have had some rain, send a bit up here. We have had 2.4 mils this month, our average is 45 mils for June, only a few days to go must be going to rain Cats and Dogs.I bet we won't get any more this month though.
Keith your work is very interesting, if you get any thing on south east QLD, I would love to see it.
Hi F.E. we don't have a problem with salt here and we can still catch fish in our creek when there is water in it. Our farm is next to about 25,000 acres of Forestry all trees, and the forestry has planted most of the open country around us with hardwood forest about three years ago, yet we have had the worst 2 years of drought on record. I think the trees they planted have soaked up all the water that would normaly come down the creek.I have to agree with you the country has been over farmed with out looking to the future, what do we do now? :rolleyes: :cheers:With all these Chalkies around I will have to watch my spelling.
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/06/2004 08:30

Hi All and FE
I sure did teach in Port Hedland. I taught full time at South Hedland. It's very different up there to any other place I have taught at. Sometimes it was really hard and at other times very rewarding. I am semi retired now but teaching Adult Ed part time to unemployed youth and anyone else who cares to come along. At the moment I have a 63 year old lady and a 29 year old lady as well as 5 sixteen year old boys and I thought PH was hard at times!!! However due to lack of funding, from any source, including state and federal governments, we may not be able to offer this course next year at our Neighbourhood House, which is a real shame as I have seen a big change in some of these people. This is the youths' last opportunity while they are still young enough to get Year Ten and maybe an apprenticeship or some whorthwile employment. They were kicked out of school because of non attendance and unacceptable behaviour. I get the spasmodic attendance, but not the behaviour. I've seen some small glimmers of it, but in a small group its not the same as being a hero in front of a big class.Anyway I am pretty cross that we donot do more for our diadvantaged youth and those who for one reason or another missed an education when they were young. Okay off my soapbox now!.
The weather here is quite different to PH. I am freezing most of the time, but Mulwala is a very pretty spot, especially where I live,There is a huge lake nearby and a forty five hole golf course. I live on an acre, so I have plenty to do as hubby works away. He is in Nth Qld at the moment.
Gabby
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/06/2004 10:07

Quote:
Originally posted by Joe Marshall:

Keith your work is very interesting, if you get any thing on south east QLD, I would love to see it.
Hi Joe,

Yes I will certainly look into that for you. I take it from a quick web search (which directed me to houses for sale in Fernvale laugh ) that you are somewhere near Ipswich?
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/06/2004 17:07

Yes Keith we are about 40 mins from Ipswich in a west north west direction our closest BOM station is Amberley or Gatton.
Thanks Joe :cheers:
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/06/2004 14:20

G'day guys, especially Goody,

This is the result of an analysis I have done on Wagga Wagga's rainfall prospects.

Some background follows.

The current phase of the SOI is falling, with the June 30 day average at minus 13.6, after being about 15.0 in May and more mildly negative in April. The average for the 3 months was about minus 1.

I have looked at two basic parameters: the chance of receiving the median rainfall, and the probability of certain deciles. This was using the following criteria: Average SOI, SOI phases, and SSTs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

The period analysed was the prospect of rain from July to September inclusive.

AVERAGE SOI

Chance of Rain

Using the average SOI, an average of between minus 5 and plus 5 has no statistically significant effect on the probability of rain for these months. So it is best to rely on the probability of receiving the median over all years, which is 49%. This means there is a 49% chance of getting over 150mm in the 3 months, and a 51% chance of getting less than that. The chance of getting at least 180mm is 32%, and of getting at least 80mm is 89%.

Deciles of rain

Similar results were obtained. There is no statistically significant effect. So for all years, for example, there is an 80% chance of receiving at least 103mm, and a 20% chance of getting at least 195mm.


SOI PHASES

The current phase of the SOI is falling, and this also has no significant effect on the rainfall for this particular period. So we use the rain for all years, and we get the same results for chance and deciles.


SSTs (Sea Surface Temperatures)

No significant effect occurs on the rainfall for this period from changes in the surface temperatures of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. This also applied to chances of getting the median, and various deciles.

Reliability

For using the average SOI values, the forecast accuracy is moderate, between 50% and 60%.
The forecast accuracy is not as good for SOI phases as it is relying on the average SOI.
Comparisons with neighbouring stations (I compared Junee, Tarcutta and Illabo), give similar results, with some minor variation. The skill would be more relevant if there were a significant relationship between the various criteria and the historical rainfall.

Practicality

A lot of this number crunching boils down to how much rain is needed to plant crops, or whatever.
There is a reasonable (average) chance of getting 150mm of rain in Wagga in the 3 month outlook period.
Remember that these figures only relate to a 3 month period of the year; results for other seasons may well be much different and in any event should not be taken as applying to a whole year's rainfall..

I hope people find this interesting.

Joe, I will look at your area next and post a result here.
:cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/07/2004 01:28

Hi All, crikey after all that hard work Keith i recon Goody had better just listen to the frogs & watch for the ants building higher walls around their holes.... wink wink
:cheers: FE
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/07/2004 16:37

Yes, far more reliable than statistics! laugh
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/07/2004 21:52

G'day there Keith how are ya ? wink

Boy oh boy ! You are going to be my bestest friend laugh

You know that amount of rain will grow a crop !

Despite it being late if it falls at the right time now it will do it !
Yes Yes Yes ...& we all know what these words mean laugh

I hav'nt put any in this year deciding that enough was enough. Mind you I am only hobby farming now

Those fulltime farming are just finished sowing with the earlier established dry crops coming up. Thus far we have had a little over 4.5" or 180mm for the year, the moisture profile is down 50mm or 1'8" into the soil which is about half of what we would normally be looking for.

Thank you for crunching the numbers Keith your posting is very interesting

C'mon the ants & frogs !
With Regards & my brown trout (shout) :cheers:
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/07/2004 22:15

Well, the experts urge caution..if the latest plunge in the SOI is maintained for another few weeks the outlook will change dramatically. However it's come up a bit in the last few days so you never know. On balance I think we are in for a statistical correction in coastal NSW which would be caused by a shift of the high pressure belt further south from where it is now.
If we get the right upper air combination some good rain might follow over a wide area of NSW and Victoria. I'm no expert though.

Some were even saying the Darwin cricket might be washed out! But I dont think that will happen now. GASP for 192 hours out was even progging a low over the Kimberleys and a tropical low near the Solomon Islands.

Possibly this signifies the start of the correction I referred to above.
:cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/07/2004 22:10

Hey Goodie, i just tried to send you a reply PM about those water tanks which i forgot about when replying last week - but i've had a bad time with the computer & i'net today so if you don't get the new PM let me know as i saved a copy to another file i think eek
Hi Heather, you've changed that login name again, keeps me guessing - but great to hear you are looking at a bit of school work, those littler kids always remind me that life is a wonderful thing - my wife does relief teaching and although qualified for both High School & Primary teaching, refuses to teach High School & has her most fun with the little ones - we send in a few little creatures from the Park at times - she says that her biggest problem is trying not to step on the little kids as they get so excited and all cling aound her!!!
Anyway we have just started school holidays over here today and by the end of next fortnight i'll probably need a few days fishing to relax!
Cheers :wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2004 01:16

Thank you FE yes I have your reply

Have been away in Canberra town ...came home over the Brindabella mountains this day

Happy fishing remembering those who go down to the sea ... ones life is but cast on a line

:cheers:
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/07/2004 16:20

G'day guys,

About a fortnight ago in this thread I said I would look into Joe's rainfall prospects (SE Queensland) so here are the results of that, running a bit late. shocked

The current SOI for the last 30 days is around the same as what is was in June, and is therefore in a negative phase. However for the 3 months to the end of June the average was around minus 1. There is a problem with determining a reasonable basis; the average for the last 90 days is just over zero so we can safely assume a neutral phase in the long term. Thus what follows is more or less based on the same criteria as was used when I looked at Goody's area (Wagga Wagga).

To recap on a bit of statistical 'lingo', the median rainfall is the rainfall that has occurred in one-half of the years of record for each station.

The period analysed was the prospect of rain from July to September inclusive. I looked at Gatton, Toowoomba and Ipswich. Archerfield's rainfall is unavailable and indeed there aren't a lot of rainfall stations close by so I have spread the area a bit to get a slightly better idea of reliability of estimates.

With the SOI where it is at present, there is a statistically significant effect on the chances of getting the median rainfalls for each of these locations. This implies that this would be the case for a wider area of SE Queensland south and east of Toowoomba to the NSW border. There is reasonably good accuracy across all 3 stations in July but not for August and September. So outlooks for the latter 2 months need to be treated with somewhat more caution.

Using the above criterion of average SOI for the 3 months prior to July, the probability of getting the median rainfall for the 3 months to September for Gatton (86mm) is 57%, Ipswich (96mm) 59% and Toowoomba (124mm) 62%. Here, I am referring to the median for the total climatic record regardless of the SOI. The probabilities quoted however, are for years where the SOI is where it is now. That is to say, the chance of rain is higher than it would be for all years averaged out.

Again, using the same criterion, for Gatton, there is a 37% chance of receiving at least 120mm over these 3 months, and and 86% chance of getting at least 60mm.

The influence of sea surface temperatures and the present phase of the SOI (falling as of 30th June) is not significant.

To make sense of all of the foregoing (it's quite hard to summarise but even using a table could be just as confusing!), some caution is required in determining the rainfall that is likely to be received because some factors have no significant effect. The only one that does is the average SOI. In addition, the skill in forecasting is variable. On balance it would be safer to rely on the probability of getting the total climatological medians, which for Ipswich (96mm) is 49%, Gatton (86mm) 49% and Toowoomba (124mm) 48%. You can see from this that in all years the probabilities are virtually the same across a wide area.

So there you go, I've had a crack at it, I hope it's of some use, especially for Joe.

:cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/09/2004 22:20

Hi All, other than checking in to do my footy tipping now and again i've had a few very busy weeks and a bad dose of the flu, so haven't been very active around here, so heres a bit of an update from the west...
Another wonderful season over here on the south coast, feed only stalled a bit last week when we had about 6 consecutive cold wet days, but this week has been just wonderful spring weather and pastures looking good. From most accounts crops are good right thru the wheat belt & great southern with just a few pockets of disappointments - haven't heard from Flame out east there to know what’s happening, i think they had a late start, but seem to have had a bit of good rain lately.
We just put 24 big red deer thru abbs and got told they had too much fat under the skin, love to hear that for a winter kill!. Cattle prices have had a slow slide over here recently, which is a bit disappointing after some good prices back at the start of the year.
3 weeks ago a farming friend of mine drove a new truck back from Brisbane thru western NSW and was really shocked at the poor season out that way and the lack of feed...not good at all!!
Hey Keith can you give me a link to the Oz ocean temps, the site i used to use has vanished & i can't find it again shocked Not many squid about ATM & i've got to find something to blame other than my lack of skill wink
Anyway i hope you are all well, half the population over here has had a rotten flu, knocks 6 bells out of you, then you make a recovery and the rotten thing comes back for a second go - i'll have to stop playing tough and get flu jabs next year i think, don't want another winter like this....
Cheers to all FE
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/09/2004 12:28

G'day FE,

Hope you feel better soon.

The following URLs show the latest sea surface temperatures and departures of same from normal. They are world wide but Australia's are clearly visible.

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/current/meansst.shtml

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/current/anomsst.shtml

Sure could do with some rain in Sydney. I'm having the driest year so far in 55 years of data for this area. Patterns however look like changing, we have some large thunderstorms offshore after some local brief heavy downpours last night in some places (I was chasing one of them but didn't have enough of a time span to pursue it all the way to Wollongong). Promise of heavy rain mid week on the latest BoM predictions.

:cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/09/2004 13:58

Hi Keith - thanks for those links - you are rapidly becoming a national icon for services rendered to Ag & fishing (wink wink) BUT re your rain for Sydney - it will rain for a week starting 19th Sept (i have booked airtickets to your fine city for that week) so can guarantee some rain then!!!!
Cheers FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/09/2004 20:08

Hi FE hope you get over the flu soon & start to feel a lot better :wave:

Did you get any rain or hail this afternoon Keith?
I was listening to the footy on the ABC when the storm started

Heather
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/09/2004 21:51

Hi Heather,

Yes I got only pea size hail for a few minutes, but tonight have had some more, this time small marble size, scattered all over the road. It too didn't last long but 3 times tonight I have heard hail and heavy rain up to 5 kms away, going right around me here. Nice light show with plenty of rumbles, I think the 'gods' are doing their bowling practice!

For all of that I have received the princely sum of 2mm of rain.

More to come this week...fingers crossed it doesn't fizzle out.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2004 13:26

PLeased you didn't get any damage out of that
Hope you get some rain through the week,we are supposed to get some tomorrow.........I will wait & see

Heather
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2004 17:21

Hi FE and all,
Things are going along pretty good here, although we are pretty lightly stocked again, after a light 'wet'. The cattle are still in excellent condition and probably still gaining weight. Hopefully some early storms soon will see us through, otherwise we will be selling more, because I don't think we have the grass to see us through till Jan/Feb. We just sold a mob a lot younger than we would have liked, but with the excellent markets, it's not so bad.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2004 21:27

Some better news at last from over there DnotO,i noticed that your cattle prices have held up well, its a bit of a mystery to me why prices have slipped over here with pastoral country looking so good i thought there would be a bit better demand?? guess thats life anyway - demand for venison is huge for us ATM - the very high price of lamb certainly helping on the local domestic markets - French Lamb cutlets $23 kg, but still one of my favourites !!!!
Cheers FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/09/2004 16:54

Quote:
Originally posted by reddust:
Talking of Chalkies I am currently studying to be a Teacher's Aide for Special kids & I am really enjoying it.
wink
Heather :cheers:
It's a great job, Heather. I worked with Special kids for 3 years at Port Pirie Special School and loved every minute of it... it was the travel that was the killer (200km round trip).

Hi all.

It's an interesting season we're having... we're 1.4mm behind our 2002 total for this time of year.
In 2002 they said we were in drought, yet this year there's been no mention of the lack of rain or the dreaded "D" word. I wonder how long it'll take? confused

Average to Sept 7: 287.2mm
Total to 9am (2004): 234mm
Total to 9am (2002): 235.4mm

Even though we're lacking in rainfall, the crops in the district are doing relatively well, albeit much shorter than in bountiful years.
This area (according to the graziers) is drought-proof country... you can always grow some feed on it. Of course that doesn't fill the rainwater tanks and we're not privvy to town water. :rolleyes:

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/09/2004 09:46

Prices are still right up in SW QLD. Roma still topping 20c/kg for light steers. export market out of Darwin is currently around $1.80 for steers and 1.70 for heifers, weighed and dipped in darwin.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/09/2004 07:38

Hi all and Keith thanks for all the info on our weather a while ago i haven't beeen able to get back sooner my pc was full of bugs took 3 weeks to fix. We are getting rain at the moment not much but could keep up during the day. The west has had good rain last night up to 80 mm in places.We were lucky to receive 34 mm in late August that no one else seemed to get, we planted sorgum and it is doing good.There seems to be more showers around this spring than the last couple of years, maby things are going to change. :wave:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/10/2004 23:37

Hi All, Just getting over our 6 day dash to Sydney a week or so back - you know how it is, look forward to it, takes 4 weeks to get ready for 6 days away then 2 week after getting back we are still way behind.... but it was a great time!
5am start to Growers markets on the Saturday morning, finished at 1pm, quick 450km drive to Perth, dinner party in Perth that night, out to airport by 11pm, arrived Sydney at 6am Sunday morning - welcomed by our soon to be daughter in law - lovely young lady who we had never met, but she had to find us as despite all our planning my son had to work away until Tuesday!!! some great adventures in Sydney, met the wonderful TWCo folk (but Mark was swinging the lead wink wink had our first trip to Blue Mountains - we will be back there for a lot longer next time, found some great historic Oz art at Sydney gallery, my good lady pulled me round & round Sydney in Bloom & found a new ferry trip to Mosman Bay - again fantastic.
Friday 6-30 am to Sydney airport, lunch with daughter in Perth at noon & back ready for Growers Markets next morning…then 2 weeks school holidays in the park.!!!!
Just a bit too much as somewhere along the line I picked up the flu for 3rd time this year – flu jabs top of the list next year for me.
The flight back to Perth was in daylight hours and I was shocked at the extent of dry in western NSW / east SA and didn’t like the look of some very poor crops in WA SE wheat belt. Friends of ours up Geraldton way have also been very disappointed with their harvest – rain ended just too early and Sept rainfall about 50% in a lot of areas.
Good down here on the coast, but hay paddocks drop off quickly as you go inland, a lot of cattle going to market early down here in anticipation of tight feed for summer!
Hope you are all keeping well wherever you are,
:wave: FE
Posted by: Lightnin

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/10/2004 21:46

Crops are dieing around here, it is amazing the way they have deteriated the last 10 days... if we don't get rain VERY soon, we will be facing the 9th year out of the last 10 that have seen below average yields, coupled with low prices, this is so frustrating!!!

Could end up very bad.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/10/2004 21:22

Hi F.E. and all,
Good to here you have had a little time away F.E. Things are really bad here now, our last rain was 34 mls the end of august, and very little since March. the temp got to 36 today with N W winds good for fires, however the BOM is tipping rain and storms for Monday and mabey later on during the week hopes up again,its 14 years now since we have had a good run. cool
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/10/2004 09:47

Hang in there everyone
Surely it has to change soon,I know we have been saying that for awhile now
Jan 39.5
Feb 0.0
Mar 0.0
Apr 0.0
May 47.4
Jun 33.0
Jul 4.0
Aug 52.0
Sep 3.1
Oct 24.0

Pretty good ,but we could do with a lot more,just to start getting over the drought.
In a perfect world 25mm every month would be fantastic,but I don't think that is going to happen
Hope you all get some decent rain soon,pleased you had a good break FE

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/10/2004 12:22

What a difference a week or two makes. A fortnight ago everything was lush and green laugh , a week ago things were starting to dry out but still had a nice green tinge smile and this week the grass has turned brown and yellow. frown
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/10/2004 13:21

Quote:
Originally posted by Osprey:
What a difference a week or two makes. A fortnight ago everything was lush and green laugh , a week ago things were starting to dry out but still had a nice green tinge smile and this week the grass has turned brown and yellow. frown
Here at Bredbo in NSW Southern TableLands we are still waiting for the break.

2 days ago our springs suddenly stopped running.
Hopefully that means some rain is on the way laugh

If not eek
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/10/2004 16:20

I was down the south coast on the weekend, and on friday night we had a downpour. It was weird. Big heavy drops that saturated me while I went to the car for our luggage. It must be years since I've experienced rain like that.

Meanwhile, during the ski season, I overheard a couple of guests discussing the drought. I worked out pretty quick they were city folk when they commented that the Yass area wasn't in drought, everything was so pretty and green.
I wonder what they thought all those big dry holes in the paddocks were for?!

I'm getting very hopeful about this eastern system, crossing everything in the hope of rain to fill my tank and put something in my dam.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 12:44

Quote:
Meanwhile, during the ski season, I overheard a couple of guests discussing the drought. I worked out pretty quick they were city folk when they commented that the Yass area wasn't in drought, everything was so pretty and green
Makes you wonder doesn't it ant?

I heard Sami Lucas on the Today show yesterday & she mentioned she was in "The Outback" she was at the Orange field Days :rolleyes:

Hope you get your rain,everything here is turning brown & red once again

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 12:57

Turning brown here as well(Mostly the hills ATM)

NSW gov think just because we have 1 month above average we must be "Marginal" but were way behind in rainfall.. :rolleyes:

http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/reader/drt-area-200410-large.gif
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 13:28

Quote:
Originally posted by Weathernut:
Turning brown here as well(Mostly the hills ATM)

NSW gov think just because we have 1 month above average we must be [b]"Marginal"
but were way behind in rainfall.. :rolleyes:

http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/reader/drt-area-200410-large.gif [/b]
They seem to think that as long as there is a green tinge in the paddocks and water in the dams you are OK mad
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 15:06

Well, there might be green tinges in the paddocks, but the dams aren't looking too great around here, although they have something in them now. You have to wonder how they compile their info. I'm about to sink a bore, hoping to find something in the shale.
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 15:30

Quote:
Source: http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/reader/drt-area
The Hon Ian Macdonald MLC, Minister for Primary Industries in NSW releases a new drought map each month. The drought maps are prepared from information provided by the 48 Rural Lands Protection Boards around the state, rainfall details from the Bureau of Meteorology and reports from Department of Primary Industries regional staff.

Drought classification of an area takes into account the following factors:

  • a review of historic rainfall records for the area
  • pasture availability
  • climatic events such as frosts
  • seasonal factors such as pasture growing seasons.

NSW Government assistance measures require that a Rural Lands Protection Board be in the drought-affected category for six months before landholders are eligible for financial assistance.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 18:13

Quote:
NSW Government assistance measures require
that a Rural Lands Protection Board be in the drought-affected category for six months before landholders are eligible for financial assistance.
And that is only the begining,
there is a lot more crap to go through after that papers etc
,only to be told no you are still not elligible.
roflmao@payments biggest joke ever,we told the truth in our forms we filled in,we know others that
stretccccccccched the truth a bit
as some people love doing & they get the payments.
I was always told that honesty is the best policy,but have found that to be not true to my disgust
So from now on I will be very guarded in the honesty department
not that I will lie but I will just be less inclined to be out there unless asked

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 20:22

Robert
Can you please empty your pms I am trying to send you a message

Heather
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/10/2004 23:52

I have emptyed some PM`s smile
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2004 02:23

Drought, a natural disaster mother nature has dished out far too often in recent history. Heartbreaking, sad, families torn apart, self-confidence fades into the dust along with hope.
Yes, the EC scheme does need reviewing & a great big dose of common sense added. The application forms are a nightmare but there are ways of ‘getting around’ some of the hurdles without sacrificing integrity. An example of this ‘getting around’ some of the issues:
A couple who own 170,000 acres, 2 separate cattle properties in 2 neighbouring shires applied for the EC assistance by filling out the forms themselves. They were refused twice. The combined rainfall total of the 2 properties was 75mm from October 2003 to July 2004. They had sold ¾ of their stock & were hand feeding the pick of their breeding stock. Fortunately water was available from several bores, although restrictions are in place limiting quantity. With the cost of molasses plus the freight & feed additives the stock were only getting meagre quantities, enough to just keep them alive. You can imagine the state this couple were in. The only time they left the property was to buy meagre groceries, pick up parts (when they could afford them) or see the bank manager & have their over-draft extended. This couple hadn’t had a social day let alone a week-end in town for 8 months.

To add insult to injury, some low-down mongrel entered the property in December, stole diesel & several thousand dollars worth of tools, parts & tractor tyres. After which, family celebrations couldn’t be attended. For security safeguard, the husband on the main property & the wife on the other feeding & watering what was left of their stock & doing general farm maintenance, neither could leave for more than a few hours at a time. The wife can’t remember the last time she had a night out with ‘the girls’. The husband hasn’t had a beer since Christmas last year, a six pack present from his wife. No such luxuries as shampoo & conditioner, fresh fruit or a bowl of ice-cream, let alone a holiday.

This couple were advised to contact the NFF (National Farmers Federation) to get assistance with the EC forms. A staff member was sent out from another farmers association to visit them & the forms filled in & submitted…………. Bingo!! Assistance approved. Information in one section of the form was re-worded, that’s all it took to get the approval. The re-wording was not a lie, simply rephrased & more information added. Even with the EC scheme assistance, this couple still don’t have a social life but it has helped to lift a little of the burden & give back a little hope of survival. The wife when asked why she didn’t seek care packages from the Salvos or other organisations her answer……. “some other poor bugger probably needs it more than us”.

Like the majority, this couple purchased their properties, stocked them, built their house & sheds. Dozed their dams, built yards, fences & bought machinery. Nothing was handed to them & they weren’t going to walk away from it without a fight. Even without the EC assistance this couple would still have battled on regardless. Why? Because it’s that love of the land & cattle. It’s not their first drought & it won’t be their last to battle.

Due to health reasons, we sold our property 12 months ago, my husband would love to buy another property & is greeted with a glare every time he opens the Country Life paper at the Properties For Sale section. Although I do miss working in the yards with the cattle, dust, flies & heat, it’s my time now & I’m not letting it go. I'm quite contented for the time being with our 10 acres & 6 head.

Jules
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2004 07:10

I worked very closely with the state drought relief scheme in Qld in the 80's and 90's,and I can tell you it's a very frustrating business. The fundamental problem is running a scheme which is fair to the primary producers, but also transparent and accountable to the taxpayers that are funding the scheme, which is very hard to do given the diversity of enterprises and conditions across the state, which are covered by the scheme.
My biggest dilemma was that the graziers that managed their pastures better, and looked after their land were generally the last to qualify for drought status. In the end I was of the opinion that the scheme rewarded the worst managers and not the best, so it should be scrapped all together. Many producers appear to not bother with the drought subsidy scheme because of the associated stress involved in getting anything, and many have realised that they can recover the subsidy equivalent by managing their properties how they feel is best, rather than adjusting things so that they qualify with the subsidy criteria.
I haven't had much to do with EC declarations, but I gather their criteria are even more stringent than our state criteria. From what I have seen, by the time you are eligible for EC assistance, many are already out the back door.
If anyone has any ideas on how to improve assistance shemes, I'm sure the relevent bodies would be happy to hear them.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2004 08:25

What a sad story I hope everything works out for that couple,they deserve it to after what they are going through

We have the good fortune to have hundreds of wild goats running around here on our property & that is our paycheck atm,we round them up early in the morning & when we have about 200 or so sell them to get a bit more cash.Thank goodness for them or we would have been gone from here 3yrs ago & not by choice either

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2004 08:33

I agree. Quite often it is the battlers and the one's who really need the assistance that do not get it, whereas the big companys etc who know how to bend the system manage to gain from it.

Very sad and unfair frown
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/10/2004 22:36

Hi All, Sad but true, examples similar to what i have been told about by a cousin farming in New South Wales - in one case 2 adjoining farms in same Council area - just how the application was filled out and how one person sees the situation....stick with your goats Heather - lot easier & more straight forward than dealing with people & committees wink
Hey Jules that was a very interesting post becos in one of the cases that got assistance my cousin recons the successful people absolutely overstocked the place and were always going to get into trouble, whereas the neighbours who didn't get any help had been particularly careful, but still couldn't handle 3 rotten years!!!
i've just been up into the Great Southern to a funeral, & arrived to find they had 120 points Wednesday night - too late for pasture, but should put a bit of weight into the grain. i still recon we are really going to have to rethink farming now, as there is no doubt in my mind that the rainfall is in decline (for whatever reason) but equally as bad is the irregularity of seasons behaviour and the huge variations of rainfall within short distances.. We've had a good season up to September, & now its right on the edge of going dry quickly - 10 kms inland from me a lot of hay pasture has lost up to 50% of bulk - lot of cattle sold in the last 2 weeks! here its drying, but with us continuing to be understocked becos of uncertainty of things we will have ample stock feed for summer - had this been 10 years ago i'd be in a panic now, cos i used to be constantly overstocked & pushing just too far - only got caught once - too many sleepless nights - never again!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/11/2004 10:37

Great night last night
28.5mm of rain,belting down on the tin roof
Couldn't sleep as I wanted to get out & have a look at the creeks etc
OUr tank/dam got some much needed water in it also

A sleepless night or rain I know which I will pick anyday

Hope everyone who needs the rain gets it soon,even if you don't need it I hope you get some

Heather smile laugh
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/11/2004 17:48

Hi we had 24 mm 14 days ago and another 12mm on Wednesday and it is raining now very light though,it is expected to clear over night. My wife and I went to Gosford last weekend by car, we were very surprized at the country down through N.S.W., green grass every where, we came back the coast way and again green all the way.When we got home back into drought again, must be something about this place.We hope to go away for 2 weeks soon to the beach where we can look at the water.By. :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/11/2004 01:19

Hey Heather great to hear you got some good rain - - i was expecting to hear that David & you were running around naked in it in the middle of the nite, but then i remembered this is a public forum so guess somethings have to remain private laugh BTW i think you could get a bit more yet as there are still systems from over here are a lot further north east than normal!!!! Gee Joe all that rain in SE Qld - surley its got to get to you!!! Anyway have a good holiday & remember to walk barefoot on the beach particularly just on the wet sand - i have just read about how the human body responds to "negetive & positive" iron charges that occur where the land & sea meet & how human foot is very receptive to this eek perhaps thats why i like beach fishing so much - gee i must be getting softer in the head by the day!!!
We have had a real quick shut off of the season down here as i expected was likely and hay pasture is really short, and in big demand even with big cattle sell offs in last few weeks - however my pasture is in a blessed little local area here and is really strong - only a few farms like it this year, but after waiting days to get a break to cut the hay on Friday, we got a bit of rain today, we can manage a few points, but we don't want an inch over nite mad anyway just have to wait & see what happens as there is a lot of thundery stuff about ATM. Crop predictions continue to be down graded over here as there just wasn't the finishing rain in Sept & October.
Hope things improve for those who need it - in WA this year reminds me very much of year 2000 with a frighteningly quick closure but this time i'm well understocked not overstocked and most grateful!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/11/2004 08:17

Hi All, We received 6mm rain in a storm last week, but that caused quite a bit of damage to our grass supply.
We decided to take advantage of the excellent prices, and sell most of our steers. The steers 360-450kg went to sth Qld feedlots, and the heavier steers went direct to meatworks.
Apparently the feedlot operators have now perfected a feeding regime for good quality brahman cattle, and can now feed them economically.
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/11/2004 08:35

Great to see all you guys are getting at least some rain that is useful and helpful, or else that conditions are good economically in one way or another. It must be so hard to get the right balance.

I think my earlier predictions in this thread might have come true for some. I recorded the wettest October here on record (55 years) and November's off to a good start at least in terms of the number of rain days.

We are still on the cusp of El Nino but certain things that make El Nino a real El Nino, are missing. It looks like 'steady as she goes' for the next few months, with the monsoon likely to break in the north at the end of December.

:cheers:

Keith
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/11/2004 09:37

We haven't had those big falls here around ACT, but what we've had has been useful, my tank is steadily filling again, and I can see a bit of muddy water in my dam. The land is greening up nicely so the roos are happy. Still a long way to go though, the earth is still very dry underneath and the trees are all looking stressed, natives and deciduous. Sank a bore on the weekend, 120 metres for 320 litres/hour! sad. Will need to put it in a tank to get enough pressure for the irrigation.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/11/2004 11:42

Hi All, Hey Dnot O, becos of the sudden shut off of season over here & no rain in Sept/Oct theres been a big sell off of good quality stock and what was over $2-10 ealier this year was down to $1-40 last week!!!
Hey Keith remember this is an all Oz forum - lucky you specified wettest October for that East Coast of yours, cos it was damned near the driest over here wink
Had best rain for weeks since i cut my hay last Friday - forecasts all lst week were for 1-5m and we got the odd dribble - today i've emptied out 7mm mad just when i wanted 3 fine days to bale - anyway i'm thankful i've got it to bale!
Ant i wonder if what you are encountering is a bit of whats happening over this way,as water is getting less, more people are putting in bores & ground water is not so plentiful??
:wave: FE
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/11/2004 14:44

Apparently because my area is very shale-y, it forms little resevoirs all through the rock. I'm on my own hill, so I'm assuming that it having been so dry for a couple of years now, the water just isn't there. The dust cloud the borers made was just phenomenal, all this fine grey dust like cement powder. It blew a KM across the valley to annoy the neighbours! Came into my house, covered the house, ugh.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/11/2004 21:59

Hi all we received 66 mm in the last 7days not enough make the creek run but the dams came up a bit. The sorgum we had in has gone mad ready to bale next week, and the grass is growing very good,it hurts your eyes all this green around, need to were sunneys.I think cattle prices will go up even further now, especially stores. :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/11/2004 22:02

Just had a look at the radar and a big front of storms heading our way, looks good, just now I can here the green frogs going mad. BY Joe
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2004 08:51

Yesterday we had a ripper of a storm
The lightning was amazing,hail,wind & 19.5mm in 15-20 mins
All the creeks where running bankers,we got water in our house tank/dam
I was supposed to go to town today but the roads are to wet & washed away I will have a try tomorrow unless we get more storms today
Bring it on

Heather
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2004 15:59

We had 39mm yesterday first rain since 11 of last month. Still no water in the creek, but padocks starting to green up, how long before the next rain. confused
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2004 22:31

Hi to Everyone with the best of Xmas Greetings & wishes for New Year !

I have been rather quiet but here is a posting to catch up with before years end...harvesting is proceeding resulting in some joy & sadness in our area of Aus as late rains saved the day to varying degrees in dry land cropping from what was looking like a disaster. The joy is mostly to the east of here as the rains came in time, the sadness being to the west as it was too late by just a week or two.

As for the present I liken it to biblical pestilence as experts believe that there could be up to 700 million plague locusts presently in the Wagga Wagga districts on their migration to the south.
A swarm up to 5 km wide & 20 km long being 30 Meters deep as a result of some 12,000 hatching areas across the State (mostly in the north) have descended in recent days on the Wagga Wagga City area.
Due to cooler & wet days they have gone to ground here munching through favoured short grasses such as bowling greens, lawns, golf courses , soccer & sporting grounds etc reducing them to brown eaten out bare areas.
It seems that lucerne crops are least effected by the pests but local farming reports say they love forage canola eating these out in a day. The pests have arrived in good condition carrying some body fat which means crop & garden damage should be minimal...I would hate to see what they did if hungry ! Yikes ! however avid gardeners have filled their garages with all sorts of favoured plants for safe keeping
My personal experiences from driving through the locusts is that it is like passing through a hail storm which results in the windscreen being covered completely to view in about 30 minutes by a yukky custard like splatter.
A must is to cover your vehicle radiator with shade cloth & turn your snorkel around.

Oh what joy is farming ! With Regards
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/12/2004 01:36

Hi All, Well what a week some of you are having on that east coast!!!! from drought to floods in just a few days - last month hottest November day for NT, today hottest December day in Perth (41+) in last 30 years - strange times. We have thunder all around tonite & radar is showing a lot of moisture out east - poor Flame might have trouble harvesting tomorrow! i went to Perth for a family wedding last weekend - what a mess Perth is new suburbs springing up everywhere - & they talk about planning - a city that is so short of water and its growing so fast - Sydney looked the same when i was there in September - IMO madness repeated all over Oz - if we are living in a electronic age, why can't we have new areas of population where there is more water & cooler living conditions - i recon Tassie has to have a big future!!!
Anyway i hope the rain is what you all needed - and not too much!!!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/12/2004 07:56

Hi All, Well the rain is hanging off here so far. We had between 23-30mm over the place last week, but this heavy country need more to get the grass going. Another 25mm this week should make some grass. The cattle are holding their condition well and should be ok for another month or so before they will have to be sold or moved to another place.
I am just about packed up, and hope to leave here on Thursday/Friday. After 21 years in NW Qld, I've decided to move to Dubbo area NSW for a change of scenery. It will be good to see different enterprises and different management practices. We are looking at buying a small hobby farm just out of town so that I am not overwhelmed by city life. I will have to find a job down there for a few years till I learn more about that country, then hopefully buy a viable property.
Anyway, I hope you all have a very merry and wet Christmas season.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/12/2004 22:24

Hi Down Not Out sorrey to here you are leaving QLD dubbo is a beautiful place hope every thing goes well for you there. Look forward to seeing your posting when you settle in down there. We have had 85 mm in the last week very busy bailing now, before the next rain comes hope so anyway. We need a lot more yet the creek started to run slowly for the first time in 9 months. Anyway all the best for the coming season.Joe. :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/12/2004 22:40

Hi all, my wife and I are heading to Bribie Is for a couple of weeks, if you don't know where that is it's just north of Brisbane, beautiful place. I would just like to wish you all a merry Xmas and a drought free 2005 year
May your pasture grow greener all the time.
:cheers: :cheers: :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2004 02:15

Hi All and a very Merry Christmas & Happy New Year to you all :wave: FE & Mrs FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2004 11:18



Thanks FE & Mrs FE
David & I are home alone today,kids have gone to their respective inlaws
Tomorrow they will arrive in full force for a couple of days
Stay safe everyone
David & Heather
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/02/2005 23:23

Hi to Everyone !

The Daily Southern Oscillation Index has for some months now on a weekly basis been dipping in & out of the plus & minus levels as I see it to quite a remarkable consistent neutral degree albeit with low figure values.

However over the last 10 days it has taken quite a nose dive into the minus which as we know from daily figures will not be sustained as a correction will follow.

The point I would like to make here with the Enso models forecasting no great change for some months & what will happen it is a time to keep close tabs on these figures for guidance.

One would think looking about here at the present time it is a great Autumn start with the recent good rains bringing on a burst of green growth....however history has taught us in this regional area that Feb rains are a false start that mostly dry up. Then when you want the rain later in April May or so you cannot get it ?

Not a good sign me thinks :cheers: amigos !
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 04:50

So, historically speaking, this rain at this time of year is just giving farmers, etc false hope that the drought is over? I must say that in the towns most people discussing weather are saying that it looks as though the drought has broken and that autumn has come early. A bit of a disappointment as far as early autumn goes because we have hardly seen summer.
Good to see you back online FE. Did you know you got nominated in the WZ awards in General weather thread? Congratulations! It's probably a bit like being nominated for an Oscar!!! wink
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 09:40

Hello Goody & Gabby
Still no rains out here in the Cobar area,well where we live anyway.

Because Cobar towns people now have user pays for their water,the place is starting to look like it did when I moved here about 40yrs ago.No green grass on the footpaths,no gardens ,looks shocking frown

The drought has never left us & doesn't look like it will any time soon.
I just hope we can sell this place & get out while we still have some stock left.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 12:05

Hi everyone.

Haven't posted in this section for awhile, but yes the lack of rain or bad timing of it is certainly a problem. We had 4" in December which was highly unusual for here, but have not had too much since.

There's a hint of bluish-green on all paddocks around here... no grass, just damn potato weed and the biggest infestation I've seen in 7½ years... very sad... you spray it, it looks sick for a couple of days and then it springs back to life. mad

I hope you get your place sold soon, Heather... you sure could do with a break. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 12:59

Hi All, good to get back into WZ - reality i call it - talking to real people who know what they are on about - not damned politicians and their nig-nods! we have a big fight for compensation on after govt announced they were putting a heavy haulage bypass thru the farm - annoying thing is that the actual roadworks will never start in my lifetime, but they recon they won't pay compensation until construction starts - its been a real pain and looks like a year of wasting money on solicitors etc coming up and i'm too tired to fight all that rubbish BUT i'm far luckier than many others & grateful about that - Hope u got an e'mail from me Goody tried to send it about 6 times, so u might have got 6laugh, Heather we will be flying over your place in a few weeks time going to my sons wedding in Sydney so i'll try to bring some rain with me.
Gabby, re Oscars - you are too kind....but i didn't get a ride in a limo! Getting near cyclone season Gab - are you going to take a trip back to PH for a weeks hols laugh
Hey Helen good to see you are still one of the very reliable WZ country people - re your weeds, i saw a very interesting program on ABC TV last weekend about getting "pepper plant" out of the Everglades - when the yanks get cranked up there is no worry about costs - they are clearing some areas totally bare down to 18 inches and replanting to get rid of this rotten plant - hope u don't get that determined with the potato weed wink
Must go - good to see so many posting in Ag forum again - just like old times!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 13:25

I doubt that I will be heading back to PH any time soon FE. Nothing much happening weatherwise up that way this year as yet. I have settled down here and don't miss it as much I did at first. Sorry to hear about the problems you are having with your farm. The government and the bureaucracies attached to it are so very hard and frustrating to deal with. I can't imagine what you must be going through. The trouble is they have almost unlimited cash to call on for legal fights and the average person just goes broke trying to make them see sense. Right now from what you say they are not making much sense at all. Don't let it get you down.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 14:22

Thanks FE & Helen

FE I will go out & wave I will be the white dot on the red ground laugh hope you all have a great time in Sydney,might give you a bit of time to have a rest from the pollies wink

Helen the sooner we sell the better I am way to old for this stuff now wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/02/2005 15:38

Quote:
Originally posted by Fine Elsewhere:
Hey Helen good to see you are still one of the very reliable WZ country people - re your weeds, i saw a very interesting program on ABC TV last weekend about getting "pepper plant" out of the Everglades - when the yanks get cranked up there is no worry about costs - they are clearing some areas totally bare down to 18 inches and replanting to get rid of this rotten plant - hope u don't get that determined with the potato weed wink
ROFL FE, if we dug down 18" we'd have a quarry here of sandstone (hence the name of our place: Sandstone Ridge). laugh

I think the potato weed did so well this year because of the December rain... usually we get a little outcrop of the weed every second year, but it dies out quickly due to the lack of moisture.

That sux about the govt trying to claim some of your land. mad I know years ago the govt here were trying to do the same with the Murray River. They wanted to create a 1km green-belt all the way along, essentially putting every riverland dairy out of business, but it seems to have fallen along the wayside and put in the "too hard" basket by the bureaucrats. Not such a bad thing when a lot of dairies have gone bust anyway.

Congratulations to your son on his upcoming nuptials... I wish the peaknuckle that's with my daughter would either make an honest woman of her or rack off into oblivion... probably the latter. laugh

Heather, you know you and David have my best wishes re the selling, besides, we need your wish of being in NZ in the winter to be fulfilled. wink laugh

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/02/2005 22:45

Hi all, we have had 234mm so far this year, the best wet season for many years, even though we could do with a bit more rain now. There has been storms in the south west tonight, so it is still around. I wouldn't say the drought is over though only the next 3 months will tell us that. I feel for you F.E. you are on a losing battle with the Govt. I have to go into Hospital again ,to have my left hip replaced this time, the right one is coming along fine after replacement 12 Months ago. I gess if I go an a plane I will set off the security alarms with all this steel in me. I better not go swimming might sink to the bottom.
By for now. :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/02/2005 13:43

Hi Joe
Hope the op goes well for your new hip,take care.

We have had the grand total of 39.5mm for the year & need heaps.
We are thinking of de-stocking some more & selling our wethers,don't know how much more we can get rid of.

Thank goodness we have an abundance of wild goats running around here because that is our pay packet atm.

Any way shouldn't moan to much as there are probably people worse of than us & at least we are fit & here to talk about it wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/02/2005 01:24

Hi All, Hope all goes well Joe - you will be totally reconditioned shortly, so i expect you'll be in those "MastersGames" thingy soon wink wink
Hope that holiday at Bribie has got you in top condition ready for the op - i was threatened with a knee op 18 months ago and the Vet said to me either get rid of 3 stone or he'd operate & having said that 100's times before thought he was on a certainty, but i knocked off almost 4 stone & the knees is fine ATM, just got to be careful in the deer yards, as 1 more kick & it will be the end!

Anyway here is a joke for you to take to hospital Joe, it should make a few of the nurses laugh:-

Typical macho man married typical good-looking lady and after the wedding, he laid down the following rules:

"I'll be home when I want, if I want, and at what time I want and I don't expect any hassle from you. I expect a great dinner to be on table unless I tell you that I won't be home for dinner. I'll go hunting, fishing, boozing and card-playing when I want with my old buddies and don't you give me a hard time about it. Those are my rules. Any comments?"
His new bride said, "No, that's fine with me. Just understand that there will be sex here at seven o'clock every night, whether you're here or not."
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/02/2005 08:02

I'm shocked!

Wonder if Baylee has a cartoon for this one laugh

Good luck with it Joe ! ... I believe they make a grease now from chicken bones to put into joints that are siezing up so have them put in a nipple while on the job.

Yes the mail got through FE Thank you !

Surely there must be an endangered species of frog or rare native flora on this Hwy by-pass at your place FE...if not just bet you could find some Native Australian stone implements ?

If all else fails put in a big rig parking bay with toll gate gold coin admission.
Seriously, my sympathies for what can & does happen with things of this nature.

To get our minds back on the job tis 8/8's cloudy here atm with some storm activity & showers ...getting greener by the day so lets hope it continues.

The Daily SOI is still holding down quite a ways
Ciao for now
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/02/2005 09:11

Well another forecast "A chance Of STORMS" has passed us by,looked really promising yesterday when I got up but soon dwindled away to nothing frown
Only storm we had was dust at about 7pm,only lasted a short while but we are getting sick of them & getting sick of sweeping the verandahs wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/02/2005 18:15

Hi All thanks for the kind words this is the second total hip replacement now so i know what to expect. I asked the doc about a grease nipple the last time he sain he wasn't a mechanic i wouldn't be surprised if they have it one day.
Maby F.E. you could tell the gov. it is your sacred land it seems to work for the aboriginals.
Put a few humpys on it and a stone axe and you are laughing.
Here's one for you about the lady with 2 female parrots in a cage, they could talk but all they would say is hi we are hookers do you want to have some fun, she was at church one day and she told the minister about her parrots, and all they wound sat was Hi we are hookers do you want to have some fun, the minister was astounded and said that was terrible and she should teach them better, then he said i know i have two male parrots in a cage and I have taught them to say there prayers, maby you shound bring them down and put them in with them, the lady thought this was a good idea it might teach them to be good. The next day she turned up with the 2 female parrots, when she walked in the 2 male parrots were saying there prayers and going through there rosery beeds, she was amazed and put her parrots in with them. After a while the 2 female parrots said Hi we are Hookers do you to have some fun, the male perrots looked up and one said put those beeds ayay Frank our prayers have been answered.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/02/2005 18:46

Good one Joe
I have another good one for you

According to a news report, a certain private school in
Washington
recently
was faced with a unique problem. A number of 12-year-old girls
were
beginning to use lipstick and would put it on in the bathroom.

That was fine, but after they put on their lipstick they would
press
their
lips to the mirror leaving dozens of little lip prints.

Every night, the maintenance man would remove them and the next
day,

the girls would put them back. Finally the principal decided that
something had to be done. She called all the girls to the
bathroom and
met them
there with the maintenance man. She explained that all these lip
prints were causing a
major problem for the custodian who had to clean the mirrors
every
night.

To demonstrate how difficult it had been to clean the mirrors,
she
asked the maintenance man to show the girls how much effort was
required. He
took out a long-handled squeegee, dipped it in the toilet, and
cleaned
the
mirror with it. Since then, there have been no lip prints on the
mirror.

There are teachers, and then there are educators...
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2005 10:34

W W Loved that joke ! laugh

My wife is a school teacher so she will appreciate this one.

Move over Baylee ..... laugh

I wish I could keep laughing but I can't ! .... I feel sick !

Please keep tabs !

www.longpaddock.qld.gov.au/SeasonalClimateOutlook/SouthernOscillationIndex/30DaysSoiValues/
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2005 11:05

Ok Goody I will try to keep them coming,pleased you enjoyed it

http://www.abc.net.au/rural/news/stories/s1309211.htm
Thanks for the link,thought you might like to read the above,can't win one way or the other frown where is the $$$$ coming from for that

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/02/2005 11:17

Here is the joke for today


> The Blind Man and the Blondes

> > A blind man enters a Ladies Bar by mistake. He finds his way to a
> > barstool and
> > orders a drink. After sitting there for a while, he yells to the
> > bartender,
> > "Hey, you wanna hear a blonde joke?" The bar immediately falls
> absolutely
> > quiet.
> > In a very deep, husky voice, the woman next to him says, "Before
you
> tell
> > that joke,
> > sir, I think it is just fair - giving that you are blind ?that you
> should
> > know five things:
> > 1. The bartender is a blonde girl.
> > 2. The bouncer is a blonde girl.
> > 3. I'm a 6 feet tall, 180-pound blonde woman with a black belt in
> > karate.
> > 4. The woman sitting next to me is blonde and is a professional
> > weightlifter.
> > 5. The lady to your right is a blonde and is a professional
wrestler.
> > Now think about it seriously, Mister. Do you still wanna tell that
> > joke?!"
> > The blind man thinks for a second, shakes his head, and declares,
> > "Nah, not if I'm gonna have to explain it five times."
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/02/2005 08:22

Hello all
Just thought I would let you know I have 3 weeks work at the local school TA Special.Funding came through last week & could lead to permenant so fingers crossed.I hope to catch up with you on the weekends

Heather
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/02/2005 09:33

Heather great to hear you have that work come your way !
Incidently my wife Jenny teaches the littlies at the main Junee Primary
I am off truck driving for the week ...heading down to Maffra this afternoon then Geelong for fertilizer home. After that I know not where but on the Hwy's Bwy's I will be.

So I shall be back at WZ on the weekend also

Ciao for now ! She loved the blonde joke !
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/03/2005 12:29

Hi All well I am out of Hospital, been out for over a week now the hip is going well, walking good with crutches, after 2 weeks. I haven't ventured outside yet. It is a pity to look out from the verandah to see the place drying up, had very little rain in Feb and none in Mar so far. looks like another drought coming up. We had friends down last week to do a few things here, it was a good help. better go can't sit too long in one place,good te here you have a little work W.W. a bit of extra money always helps.
C.U Joe :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/03/2005 15:56

G'day there Joe the Marshall

Well that's a great start Joe so it will only get better.
Yes things are drying up badly here to.

Let me tell you a funny story if you can sit still for long enough to read it :

A year or so ago I took a semi-trailer load of grain to a dairy up Tumut way, was the property of the Kelly girls on the Batlow Rd. Being rather hilly I had been using the brakes a lot more than is normal & at some stage late in the journey an s cam on the brakes went over centre on the tri axle of the trailer ... this locked the brakes on with that set of wheels.

I arrived & backed up to the grain silo out in front of the house some 50 meters away. When I got out of the truck & went back the inside tyre on the centre axle burst into flames from the heat generated from the now collapsed wheel bearings. I crawled under with a fire extinguisher to put it out but of course it did not work. Wriggling back out I decided to run down to the nearby dairy & get a bucket of water, just entering a doorway I was rocked from behind be a very loud explosion which was the tyre exploding in all directions.
Not long after I had managed to douse the flames & two of the Kelly girls quickly appeared to help, another sister came hobbling up on a pair of crutches all wide eyed asking "My God what was the explosion?" ... She said there were bits of rubber up on the lawn !
The poor soul had only been home 2 weeks from having a hip joint replacement & had not been out of the house up till then. Tell you what Joe it sure got her going !! laugh

I don't know whether the cows gave much milk that day but sure as hell gave the girls something to talk about for the next week ... laugh

Good health there Joe
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/03/2005 10:16

Joe, good to hear the op went well & you're on the road again, albeit under a caution flag wink
You'll be better than your old self in no time.
Yep getting damn dry here again, over 200mm under our average rainfall so far this year. Everyone's de-stocking & cattle prices have dropped between 15 & 20cents/kg at the last sale & not looking any better for this Thursdays sale.
Cattle conditions are dropping fast, fats having to be sold as stores, just no feed to finish them off with. Not looking good coming into winter which is our lowest rainfall period.

Jules
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/03/2005 10:37

LOL@ Goody laugh I can relate to that story. They go off like a bomb.
Just replaced the bearings, seals & s cams in our trailer & boy were they overdue! Never seen s cams so flatsided :rolleyes: As you know with machinery, one problem leads to another & another & another. The unit is for sale web page

Well must fly, need to haul my wide load into the saddle & get these cattle into the yards for tomorrows sale. Only 6 head on the house block but another 64 out on agistment block down the road. New horse arrived here this morning, so this will test her & I, she looks good & has a lovely temperment so hopefully our friendship will be a long one laugh . I haven't been in the saddle for awhile so Joe, I may need to borrow your crutches wink

Jules
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/03/2005 17:08

PLeased all went well for you Joe
Heather
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2005 09:21

Morning all
Still no rain out this way.
3mm for the past 3months
Has to come soon doesn't it???????????????

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2005 19:09

Hi All, Well I reloated from Richmond Qld in late Dec, and settled into my job here near Quambone in Mid Jan. Learning a lot about farming, and spending lots of hours on tractors. The GPS guidance and self steering tractors really amazed me, and makes it a lot easier for a novice like me.
We had only guaged 4mm of rain since I got here, but we fluked a storm of 28mm last night. Hopefully there is more to come before too long.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/03/2005 22:30

Hi Guys and Gals Thanks for your thanks on my opp every thing is going well now got as far as the front gate the other day but couldn't carry the mail back. Hey goody luckey you wern't still under that truck when the tyer blew can doo some nasty damage. I was changing the back wheels of a truck once when the inside tyre blew, I got a badly broker hand out of it and many injuries on my legs and face. Good to here from you again DNO.I wondered when you would pop up some where a gain. The rain band that has gone through was very patchy most areas on the downs had about25 mm we never got a drop our country drying up very badly now. I hope the horse went well Jules
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/03/2005 12:56

laugh We got 11mm last night from a couple of little cells, settled the dust a bit anyway.

Joe, the horse went very well, she has such a lovely temperment. Floating her out to the daughters place today, doing a days contract mustering out that way tomorrow.

I'm open to suggestions for names for a colt, at the moment the daughter calls him Toolbox :rolleyes: apparently he can be a bit of a tool laugh we really do need to find him another name.

Jules
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/03/2005 17:29

Jules after hearing the name toolbox the first thing I can think of is Spanner or mabey Screwdriver, how about Grease Gun. ????
Joe.
Posted by: dylan

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2005 11:27

how about "Shifter"?
I used to ride a horse called "Tuckerbox"...$50 special at saleyards, if it wasnt bought then it would have been Tuckerbox dogfood for sure. Died quietly of natural causes yrs later.
Posted by: dylan

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2005 11:29

On a weather note....what chance of an Autumn break from the frontal system in the west?
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2005 00:32

Hi to Everyone

Home & Away seems to be the modus operandi for me atm... have been to Newcastle then out the Golden Hwy to Dubbo to Peak Hill then Molong via Yeoval hope that is the correct spelling, on to home through Canowindra , Young , Coota etc. I am pretty sure I took all the rain with me on that trip the other day. I think someone got 54 mm at Dunnedoo as I past by laugh
Today has been Camden to Port Kembla & home with rain down the Hume ....I think I did it again !

Main reason for me telling you this is that I have been worried sick by the dive in the S.O.I. but low & behold the long awaited correction which took a whole month happened so all is not lost just yet but a real concern lingers for the Spring.

Joe yes I was "very" lucky that day as I was right in there beside that tyre only a minute or so before it went....the Kelly girls keep reminding me !

Jules checked out your truck ......mmmm nice so you should have plenty of interested buyers Good Luck with it !
As for a horse name how about Ratchet for obvious reasons ! laugh then depending on the day you can choose which ever version you like.

DNO I have just gone hi-tec with my Internet service now coming via satellite ...have not been on a GPS tractor yet but appreciate the wonder of it all !

dylan have been to your nice town ! I think we might have to wait a bit longer for something to happen.
Land of nod beckons With Cheers from me :cheers:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2005 01:02

Hi all...

Been a hoilday Goody?

About 2weeks ago i was at Wide Bay Burnett area were there was two days of very isolated afternoon showers(Got to see lightning tho it was a few 100kms from were i was) then went to the Sunshine Coast(eeerrr Rainfall Coast laugh about 10min when we got there the rain was very heavy.. but was mostly cloudy when i was there.. Seemed i took Wagga`s weather with me... laugh

I better get to bed...
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2005 08:41

Hi there Weathernut

No.... I do a bit of casual truck driving so that is what is going on there. Well, sort of casual ha ! I think I am going to Melbourne tonight.
The holiday will come in July with a fortnight to the Darwin central Aus areas.

Jules "do not" call your horse Ratchet ... having slept on it, I don't think that is very nice !
I can't really think of a nice name for a horse, so the best I can say is don't rush into it, the right one will come along laugh

Ciao for now !
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2005 09:27

Hi all yes Dylan I have been watching that system in W.A. not holding my breath though, every one has the saying it must rain one day.I've have given up hope on the S.O.I doesn't matter where it is, it's still drought in my books, if it is not an elnino what is it.
You've got plenty of names for that horse Jules.but I don't know about Ratchet, change two of the letters and thats it laugh .Happy driving Goody. cool
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2005 20:42

Hi to Everyone !

Hope we all had an enjoyable Easter weekend ...pretty quiet here but a nice luncheon was had today with friends.

One topic that came up while chatting about the weather... now what else would a bunch of farmers be talk'in about I ask you ? was that there seems to be a sudden increase in frogs.

Well, in particular the ones that have taken up residence in house roofs in recent years.

These are the Broad Palmed Frog (Litoria latopalmata)...mostly heard up in the gum trees but not all that often seen.
We have them come onto the outside of the windows at night over the summer months to catch moths attracted by the night lights. Of late there has been a marked increase in numbers with young ones appearing.

Some time back now in the Ag Forum all sorts of happenings from ants building up nests, to springs running water again, birds arriving etc were put forward as signs from nature that rain was on the way.
Not wanting to raise all of these issue again, I thought to make mention of this just in case a break comes soon & "does" continue on.

If so I for one will kiss a frog

All fringed & webbed toes crossed !
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2005 09:43

Hi Goody
We had a great weekend as well & went to Menindee for a wedding on the river banks of the Darling River.And funny thing we also talked about the weather wink
On the way home my husband & I notice a lot of young Joey's not long out of the pouch & commented that, that was something different as it is so dry..........so if you kiss the frog,I'll see
if I can catch up with a Joey laugh
Still not a lot of emu's about frown Have the fingers & toes crossed though for RAIN

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2005 10:11

Goody & Joe...... named the colt Coringa, it's the name of their place & he's the first colt on there ...... I won laugh

We've had several severe storms go around us this week-end, not a drop of rain here frown frown I could smell it & see it.

Jules
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/04/2005 11:15

Hi WW & Nacreous !

Great to read your comments WW....laughed at how "country" we are. I am a bit worried though if it rains & I have to kiss this bloody frog laugh more to follow !

Jules well done I think that is very appropriate, I must say I am pleased.

Now, I have a confession

I told you all a lie !

The frog I spoke of is in fact :

Peron's Tree Frog
Litoria peronii & this of course explains why I have heard them up in the trees....duhhh ! :nerd:

This frog can change colour rapidly.


Tell you how I found out : The other day I took a load of re-cyclables to town & when there unpacking a black plastic tub of glass bottles (beer : my wife is an alcoholic you know...very sad) I discovered 2 dark coloured frogs. The first one jumped out & despite all attempts I could not catch it again to bring home. The 2nd I did & placed it in a bottle for the journey back to the salvation of family & friends.... on the way home the frog changed colour to match my vehicle interior trim of grey ....this was from almost black of the plastic tub.
So, you know what when I got home I sat the bottle near the brick wall at the fernery & this clever little so & so changed colour again to match the brickwork of biege.

I don't know if this was a thank you but when I walked out that door the next night a frog jumped "smack" right onto my forehead & stuck like you know what ! ha laugh

I will try to add some photos in future for the forum & like the frog colour life.

C U
Goody
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/04/2005 13:11

Hi All, quick hello - we've just had 220mml in last 60 hours and we have been flooded by a blocked Council drain - i just put a separate report in Breaking Weather if you want to read it... have lots of work to do - getting wet lower level of square bales out of flooded shed, burying drowned animals once i can get the tractor into the paddock, get some hay out - just came in for late breakfast & cuppa - didn't get to growers market today!!!!!
frown FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/04/2005 14:01

I wrote a reply earlier but must have forgotten to send it. Sorry to hear about your animals Fe. That is very bad news. I guess the council didn't count on that much rain down your way?
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/04/2005 14:26

FE, you got a deluge but at a cost to you & your animals frown
This weather is one extreme to another in different parts of the country.
Sorry to hear about your animals frown frown

Jules.... off to read your report.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/04/2005 17:12

Hi FE
David & I are thinking of you & what you are going through,keep your chin up.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/04/2005 01:34

Hi All, thanxs Gabby, Nacreous & Heather - its been a long day and good to remember that nature is still in control - just keeps us humans in our place! Looking at the debris line in the paddock on the fence we worked on this afternoon the flow was 45 meters wide and 1 meter deep - lot of water flow in an hour!! we should have put that long bit of black poly over to your place Heather laugh
Anyway off to sleep like a top tonite...
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/04/2005 10:15

Hi FE
Hope you had a good night,plenty of sleep & all is well today smile
Amazing weather contrasts we have,you fighting the rain & water damage one day.We are losing lots of topsoil as it is blowing dust today.

Have a great day everyone laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/04/2005 10:23

Just to have a laugh for the day laugh


Little Johnny watched, fascinated, as his mother smoothed cold cream
on her face.
"Why do you do that, Mommy?"
"To make myself beautiful," said his mother, who then began removing
the cream with a tissue.
"What's the matter?" asked Little Johnny. "Giving up?"

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/04/2005 01:12

Hi All, just posted some of this in Breaking Weather - might make your lift your eyebrows - as apart from the 220mls i had, i heard today of 3 rainfall readings for the same period of 9 inches, 11 inches and 14inches!!!!!
the following is part of an email i got from farming friends from Cranbrook about 100km north of us:-
"Yes - we're here - 150 mls Wednesday night until yesterday morning including the 98 on Friday so its a bit wet - a few ewes died here - just a handful but Ian had just finished shearing Wednesday morning and he's lost over 150 pregnant ewes and there have been some losses on other farms well over the 250 / 300 and apparently one with 900 and another with 1000. Amazing - it just seemed to be swirling round and round on the radar as it moved south-east.We had our Cranbrook Show planned for Sat. but cancelled on Friday afternoon - too much damage for locals to be cleaning up and not fair on the others to come with their stalls etc. and have such a small crowd..... so we'll re-organise for sometime in the next few months - maybe the Spring but who knows how the weather will go this year. In 1982 when we all had the 9 inches over a couple of days in the January we were drought declared by the October - only had another 4 inches for the year but this is at a better time and the first lot was a good soaking and then the heavy rains caused the run-off so the soil moisture is pretty good at the moment."
Thats enough about our rain now - its too unfair on those needing some, becos for all the trouble it caused, this should set us up for a wonderful lot of winter pasture!!!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/04/2005 09:08

Hey FE, despite the damage, so glad you got some amazing falls at the "right" time of year.

Our last magic rainfall was in December with 108mm, but unfortunately all it did was make the potato weed spring up to the best it's been in 10 years (according to the locals).

Even though another good rainfall has been lacking in these parts so far, we still have an abundance of dry feed... helps only having two horses on the place currently.

We got the dribbles from your good falls... 2mm in the last two days... only just enough to settle the dust for a day or two.

Supposedly later this week a stronger change is to go through with better falls for our area, so I hope my weather gurus are correct on this. I'd like to work up our front paddock soon and have it picture perfect for spring when I intend to put in a small patch of lucerne. smile

Heather, I hope this impending change brings you some desperately needed rainfall... I'd even forego a couple of inches just to see you get some. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/04/2005 15:56

Thanks Helen
We had a big storm that lasted all day yesterday wink About 6" of dust in total,it wasa shocker.
Here's a bit of humor for today


I think
There was this bar and in the bar there was a magic mirror. If you told a lie it would suck you in. One day a brunette walked into this bar. She walked up to the mirror and said 'I think I'm the most beautiful woman in the world' and it sucked her in. The next day a redhead walked into the bar. She walked up to the mirror and said 'I think I'm the most beautiful woman in the world' and it sucked her in. Then the next day a blond walked into the bar. She walked up to the mirror and said 'I think...' and it sucked her in.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2005 09:46

Hi all, sorrey to here about the damage FE but the rain should make a differance, we are getting misty showers today coming across from the coast. Good one Heather here's one for you. I will never here church bells ringing again without smiling....Upon hearing that her elderly grandfather had just passed away,Katie went straight to her grandparent's house to visit her 95 year old grandmother and comfort her. When she asked how her grandfather had died, her grandmother replied. He had a heart attack while we were making love on sunday mourning.Horrified Katie told her grandmother that two people nearly 100 years old having sex would surely be asking for trouble.Oh no my dear ,replied granny, many years ago, realising our advanced age we figured out the best time to do it was when the church bell would start to ring. It was just the right rhythm. Nice and slow and even, nothing too strenuous, slimply in on the ding and out on the dong. She paused to wipe away a tear, and continued.He'd still be alive if the ice cream truck hadn't come along.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2005 12:03

I'm shocked !
The Agricultural Forum will never be the same again ! eek

Oh & Hi to Everybody wink
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/04/2005 12:25

Good one Joe I love it laugh laugh laugh

A farmer gets sent to jail, and his wife is trying to hold the farm together until her husband can get out. She's not, however, very good at farm work, so she writes a letter to him in jail: "Dear sweetheart, I want to plant the potatoes. When is the best time to do it?"

The farmer writes back: "Honey, don't go near that field. That's where all my guns are buried."

But, because he is in jail all of the farmer's mail is censored. So when the sheriff and his deputies read this, they all run out to the farm and dig up the entire potato field looking for guns. After two full days of digging, they don't find one single weapon.

The farmer then writes to his wife: "Honey, now is when you should plant the potatoes."

Have a good day everyone
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/04/2005 17:23

THIS IS DEFINITELY SICK-----

There was this guy and he had a girlfriend named Lorraine who was very
pretty and he liked her a lot. One day he went to work and found that a
new girl had started working there.

Her name was Clearly and she was absolutely gorgeous. He became quite
besotted with Clearly and after a while it became obvious that she was
interested in him too. But this guy was a loyal man and he wouldn't do
anything with Clearly while he was still going out with Lorraine.

He decided that there was nothing left to do but to break up with
Lorraine and get it on with Clearly. He planned several times to
tell Lorraine but he couldn't bring himself to do it.

Then one day they went for a walk along the riverbank when Lorraine
slipped and fell into the river. The current carried her off and she
drowned. The guy stopped for a moment by the river and then ran off
smiling and singing...........

Get ready, ...........


"I can see Clearly now, Lorraine has gone."

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/04/2005 19:45

That's so deranged Heather it deserves a laugh or three. laugh laugh laugh

Good one!!!

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/04/2005 09:44

It was pretty sick I must admit Helen,but I had to put it up :p laugh laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/04/2005 11:35

Exactly how long have you been out there Heather?
.....then again I can't stop laughing at your joke either smile
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/04/2005 11:45

A shepherd was herding his flock in a remote pasture when suddenly a brand new BMW advanced out of a dust cloud towards him.
The driver, a young man in a Broni suit, Gucci shoes, Ray Ban sunglasses and YSL tie leans out of the window and asks the shepherd, "If I tell you exactly how many sheep you have in your flock, will you give me one?"
The shepherd looks at the young man, obviously a Yuppie, then looks at his peacefully grazing flock and calmly answers. "Sure, why not?"
The Yuppie parks his car, whips out his Dell notebook computer connects it to his AT&T cell phone. He surfs to a NASA page on the net, where he calls up a GPS satellite navigation system to get an exact fix on his location which he then feeds to another NASA satellite that scans the area in an ultra- high-resolution photo. The young man then opens the digital photo in Adobe Photoshop and exports it to an
image processing facility in Hamburg!.
Within seconds, he receives an email on his Palm Pilot that the image has been processed and the data stored. He then accesses a MS-SQL database through an ODBC connected Excel spreadsheet with hundreds of complex formulae. He uploads all of his data via an email on his Blackberry and after a few minutes, receives a response. Finally, he prints out a full colour, 150 page report on his hi-tech miniaturized LaserJet Printer, turns to the shepherd and says "You have exactly 1586 sheep".
"That's right. Well, I guess you can take one of my sheep" says the shepherd. He watches the young man select one of the animals and looks on amused as the young man stuffs it into the boot of his car.
Then the shepherd says to the young man, "Hey, if I can tell you exactly what your business is, will you give me back my sheep."
The young man thinks for a minute and then says "Okay, why not".
"You're a consultant," says the shepherd.
"Wow! That's correct" says the yuppie. "How did you guess?"
"No guessing required" answered the shepherd. "You showed up here even though nobody called you; you want to get paid for an answer I already knew; to a question I never asked; and you don't know cr.ap about my business.
Now give me back my dog!"
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/04/2005 12:23

I've been out here far to long Dilbert as you can tell,to much time on my hands perhaps? :rolleyes:

No weather to talk about so I have been looking for humor to brighten up the day......like your joke as well laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/04/2005 19:55

Dilbert that's a ripper, first time I've heard that one and the rest of the family loved it too. laugh

Now if only the Consultant would have told the shepherd when it was going to rain... now that would've been useful. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2005 13:26

What a fantastic week I have just had.
We had a family reunion out here the past week & there was lots of reminising,laughter,kareoke,& just an absolute fun filled week.
There were 25 of us all told,some could not be here cool but we had fun for them as well.
Of an afternoon the little kidlets would put on a show for all of the adults,then we would play hide & seek or spot light with the kids,drinks,then dinner & then Kareoke,dancing ,story telling,or just plain old talking. laugh
Not once was the TV turned on for the whole week,that I loved smile
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/04/2005 17:54

The waitress in a small-town cafe knew most of her customers by name and by reputation. One, a local salesman, was quite a big- mouth talker. On a particularly busy morning, the salesman waved at the waitress and asked for a third free refill on his coffee. "Just a mouthful will do," he said.

Obligingly, the waitress filled his cup until it overflowed into the saucer...and kept on pouring until the saucer, too, was ready to overflow. Then she stopped, looked the salesman in the eye and asked, "Now, where would you like the rest of it?"
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/04/2005 18:38

Well we finished crutching our sheep today smile
What used to take 2-3 weeks now takes 4 days eek
Bloody drought

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Me

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/04/2005 20:49

Wife says to husband "the front light's broken dear, could you replace the bulb for me"???
Husband answers " do I have osram tatooed on my forehead?? I don't think so"
Later on, wifey asks hubby to fix the fridge door seal. Hubby yells "what, do I have Kelvinator stamped on my forehead or something??? I don't think so".
A bit later, long suffering wife sheepishly asks hubby to look at the dripping tap in the kitchen. Hubby storms "I don't have fowler ware stamped on my bloody forehead do I??? I don't think so. I've had enough of this, I'm off to the pub"!!!

Upon his late return, Hubby notices the front light glowing. He goes to the fridge to grab a beer and notices the seal has been fixed. The tap in the kitchen has stopped dripping.

Hubby says to wife indignantly "how did you get all these things fixed???" Wife replies "well, after you left, I sat on the front step and cried. A young man stopped and asked me what was wrong?? I told him that you wouldn't fix anything. The young man then offered to fix everything and all I had to do was to bake him a cake or have sex with him"

"So, what type of cake did you bake him"??? stammers hubby. Wife replies "helloooo, do I have Sara Lee stamped on my forehead or something"???!!!
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/04/2005 21:26

laugh An oldy but still a damn goody laugh

Jules
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2005 11:27

Did I see some one using my name in vane laugh
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2005 11:37

God I hope it rains soon ! ..... laugh

Hey Me
Do you need any chores done round your place at the moment ? wink
Posted by: Me

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2005 14:10

Nooooo, I did them all yesterday!!! eek
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2005 15:42

rofl@Goody & Me laugh laugh
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Me

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/04/2005 20:20

On his first day at work, this chap picks up the phone and dials an extension. When his call is answered, he screams down the phone "GET ME A FRIGGING CUP OF COFFEE NOW!!!!"

The voice at the other end of the phone says "do you know who this is???"

"Nope" says our hero.

"This is the director of the company, idiot" says the voice.

"And do you have ANY idea whatsover who THIS is???" says Mr Newbie.

"No" blurts the director.

"Well, thank CHRIST for that!!!!" yells the new chap, and promptly hangs up the phone.
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/04/2005 07:51

...Classic!

regrettably, it looks like another good day for burning off stubbles in the paddocks at our place. Did a couple yesterday. The low humidity helped. We might have to just burn one row at a time each day so we can can stretch the job out until the next good rain comes.

hate to whinge but I'm getting sick of this beach weather. We've fished five dead calves out of very muddy dams over this past week. Instead of playing two-up my wife and I now bet two-bob on the next poor victim being a heiffer or a steer.

thanks for the much needed laughs.
keep tempting Huey
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/04/2005 09:52

Hi Simon, welcome to Weatherzone. smile

Whinge away mate, we're all suffering in one way, shape or form and are all getting rather sick of the continuous array of warm to hot sunny days. frown

I do have a question for you and other who post here: Why do you burn your stubble?

Selective farmers over here have been doing it for years, presumably to get rid of snails, bugs, weeds etc. In fact yesterday I approached one of our neighbours who was burning his paddock and posed the same question. His reply; "I'm burning off the potato weed." Amazingly, everything burned except the potato weed. confused

Our next door neighbour (whose property encompasses ours on 3 sides) ceased burning paddocks a few years ago, much to the smell of my house's relief, and has direct drilled his seed into stubbled paddocks. The results have been nothing short of amazing... stronger healthier cereal crops. "Best farming practice" he calls it, even going as far as planting a legume crop last year for no other purpose than to put nutrients back into the soil.

He does, however, still spray his crops, but even that has slowed down in the past couple of years. My neighbour up the road has never burned or sprayed and his crops are also lush and plentiful... now if I could just convince the fella across the road. laugh

Anyway, I hope the next time you and your wife play two-up that you're both wrong and that no calves have died, it's just the saddest thing when it happens, even in a non-drought year. Lets hope that blocking upper-level high in the Tasman buzzes off sooner than later and that we all get oodles of the desperately needed wet stuff.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/04/2005 09:57

Celebrity Virus


The LORENA BOBBITT virus
(Reformats your hard drive into a 3.5 inch floppy,
then discards it through Windows)

The ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER virus
(Terminates some files and leaves,
but will be back)

The LEWINSKY virus
(Sucks all the memory out of your computer,
then Emails everyone about what it did)

The CLINTON Virus
(Gives you a 7-Inch Hard Drive with NO memory)


Hello Simon & welcome,I think you are entitled to say what you want about the weather as it sounds as if things aren't to good aroung there either,lets hope we all get a good soaking & soon.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Me

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/04/2005 12:51

laugh That's good Heather, I think my favorite is the Clinton one. :cheers:


A Mafia Godfather finds out that his bookkeeper has screwed him for ten million bucks. This bookkeeper is deaf. It was considered an occupational benefit, and why he got the job in the first place, since it was assumed that a deaf bookkeeper would not be able to hear anything he'd ever have to testify about in court.

When the Godfather goes to shakedown the bookkeeper about his missing $10 million bucks, he brings along his attorney, who knows sign language.

The Godfather asks the bookkeeper: "Where is the 10 million bucks you embezzled from me?"

The attorney, using sign language, asks the bookkeeper where the 10 million dollar is hidden.

The bookkeeper signs back: "I don't know what you are talking about."

The attorney tells the Godfather: "He says he doesn't know what you're talking about."

That's when the Godfather pulls out a 9 mm pistol, puts it to the bookkeeper's temple, cocks it, and says: "Ask him again!"

The attorney signs to the underling: "He'll kill you for sure if you don't tell him!"

The bookkeeper signs back: "OK! You win! The money is in a brown briefcase, buried behind the shed in my cousin Enzo's backyard in Queens!"

The Godfather asks the attorney: "Well, what'd he say?"

The attorney replies: "He says you don't have the balls to pull the trigger.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/04/2005 15:15

laugh laugh laugh Excellent Heather and Me... if we can't have rain then let's have some humour... more of it, I love it. laugh

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/04/2005 07:40

many thanks to all for your kind welcome. And hello again Goody, nice to hear from a fellow Wagga-ite. Jen and I are now officially with the Book Book RFS. Although I haven't had need of my clobber for super-advanced fire-fighting around here, I did need to don it to deliver a university lecture on play-writing in Sydney last year due to my taking the wrong bag with me. If you're passing by Goody, pop in. We're the land across from Wisconsin.

On the stubbles Heather, my main reason for torching is to try and break the rust cycle. I don't think it'd be 100% in weed control,but it appears to take enough new weed growth out before sowing so that the wheat might have a bit more of a chance to race everything else out of the ground. That said, yesterday in the burning paddock I asked the fella who works with us why he thought burning was a good idea and he seemed to think it assisted in stopping clogging of the seeder's points. Although if he was being truly honest about it, I reckon he'd offer a maniacal laugh and just admit that he was a card-carrying pyromanic.
We tried direct drilling last year in some paddocks and copped a hammering in terms of rust and low-yields. Apart from going back to burning, we've also offloaded the two offending varieties (H-45, Janz - outclassed) and replaced them with Chara. However, last year was hard to pick. We'd had less than 1.3 inches for 2004 till the break around 24/5/04 and this is in a place that's supposed to average 26-28".
Anyway, there's a couple of clouds approaching the Kyeamba Valley as I speak. Doubt there'll be more than 8pts in it. The afroementioned pyromaniac and I are heading into town today.
Sadly, it's time to inflict an OH&S course on us both.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/04/2005 10:30

Thanks for that explanation Simon, truly appreciated and makes it much more understandable in that case.

Ah yes, the old pyromaniac, we do have a few of them around here, only these are pyros in the true sense of the word... like the silly sausage yesterday who decided to burn just outside of Spalding on a Total Fire Ban day no less, lo and behold it got out of control, DOH!!!
I suspect he's going to learn his lesson real fast, especially when the fine comes in. laugh

A much cooler day here, currently 16.1ºC and we've had a few drops of rain hit the driveway, although nothing of substance is expected. Sure sounded nice on the roof though, but reminded me of the sweet corn ad. wink At least it'll be a good sleeping day for hubby Graeme, who's on his way home from work near the big smoke as I type and a good gardening day.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/04/2005 16:02

No jokes for awhile folks.
The school has more funding for me to go back to work again smile This time I have funding for a whole term.
I will catch up with you on the weekends though.
Have a good week everyone.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/04/2005 17:31

Have fun with it all, Heather and best of luck.

Catch you on the weekend. smile

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2005 17:15

Thank you Helen.
Had a good week with the kids,great to be back at school again.
One of the special needs kids pinched me & said she hated me,the other gave me a cuddle so I guess I came out ahead over the whole week.
Great kids.


Just before I went back to town we had a visit from a fellow from WaggaWagga he was selling rural supplies,that is the name of his business also.Do any of you who live in Wagga Wagga know him????
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2005 20:04

Looked them up in whitepages.com smile

Rural Supplies Direct it seems do exist.

Jules
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2005 20:11

I know they do exist!!!!!!!
I was wondering if any of the members from Wagga Wagga know the man personally????
We did purchase things from him . That's how I know he exists.
Thanks anyway for your help on checking in the white pages.Need not of bothered as I have the number here beside me & Rick is actually coming back in 6 weeks.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/05/2005 20:28

I think they use to have ad's on the radio stations here in Wagga.
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/05/2005 09:24

Quote:
Originally posted by W W:
I know they do exist!!!!!!!
I was wondering if any of the members from Wagga Wagga know the man personally????
We did purchase things from him . That's how I know he exists.
Thanks anyway for your help on checking in the white pages.Need not of bothered as I have the number here beside me & Rick is actually coming back in 6 weeks.
Heather :cheers:
Terribly sorry for bothering & upsetting you so much, which is quite obvious with the amount of !'s you used. frown
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2005 08:57

Hi Heather, I've asked around here at "Lorraine" Wagga and none of us have used them.

...We were wondering if anybody is using a "Kattle Gear" cattle crush out there?
We're looking at getting a new headbail.
They look a lot stronger and easier to use than the traditional design, however, my only concern is that we haven't seen one operating at full steam which is the only way to tell if a headbail is the "business". They're also a lot more expensive that the Warwicks, RPMs, etc which is another reason why we're a bit shy to jump in.

cheers
Simon
Posted by: rainman

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2005 18:11

Hello everyone
I hope it rains,soon for all the farmers,we need rain really bad & so do my Nan & Pop.
Posted by: rainman

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/05/2005 18:56

hello every one :wave:
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/05/2005 19:43

hello Rainman

Still no rain here since 15 April. The insects in the bottom of our rain gauge have all died from dehydration..
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2005 02:54

Hi once again to u all - 12inches of rain here in the last 6 weeks - absolutely wonderful start to the season as the ground is still warm and feed is growing like in Spring!
Thanxs for those who have enquired as to my whereabouts - i'm alive and kicking after possibly the busiest & most emotional 6 weeks of my life:-
A very quick summary:-
i) The big storm April 1st just under 9 inches of rain - we are still cleaning up & will be for some time ... & fighting with insurance companies!!
ii) Two weeks of schools holidays one week after the storm was interesting with kids still finding drowned Guinea Pigs around the Park !!!!
iii) Somewhere around this time my daughter wrote her car off in Perth - frightened her & us, but she was unhurt but had pride badly dented - we were very worried as she was to be a bridesmaid at our sons wedding on 30th April - luckily car was not with the same insurance company (ha ha)
iv) Somewhere around this time my old Dad got back from an Op in Perth and needed a bit of help settling back in at home which involved a lot of running around.
v) Huge Growers Market on 25th April long weekend put us under a lot of pressure.
vi) 26th April we drove up to Perth & did some business.
vii) 27th April flew to Sydney - took mid day flight, so had good view of the country below - sorry to see soooo much of the land east of Adelaide thru to western NSW soooo very dry! We didn't bring u any rain either Heather - but i did wave as we went over your backyard!!!!
viii) After 3 great days around Sydney & Blue Mountains on 30/4/05 we attended my sons wedding -the ceremony was at Watson Bay, then we went to a restaurant that was on one of the piers at Darling Harbour, with the most amazing view of Luna Park across the water and of the Harbour Bridge. A wonderful event!!!!!
ix) 2 more days around Sydney, bit spoilt by my wife not being well, but i got out & about - we had a lovely unit at Potts Point - so i could spend a wonderful afternoon at the NSW Art Gallery.
x) Back to Albany last Wednesday, to find my old Dad had been admitted to local hospital & my wife was still not so well.
xi) Big rush to get everything ready for Saturdays Growers Markets, which again was very busy on a weekend we really didn't need it to be!
xii) Because our new daughter in law is from Queensland & my son from WA, we offered to have a second wedding reception for family & friends in Albany last Sunday. The newly weds had been up to Broome for the week & arrived in Albany Saturday night. We catered for this reception ourselves as we have most of the gear required, but hired a bigger venue in town - never realised how much work was involved, ie..printing out place cards at 1-30am Sunday morning - have now told my daughter we will pay her to elope!
Thats it - the newly weds left Albany Monday morning for Sydney - i was so exhausted that i went fishing Tuesday & spent most of the day sleeping in the boat......but it was relaxing!!!!
So now things will hopefully get back to normal & i promise to be more social on the forum now life will hopefully return to normal!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Tim S

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2005 03:30

Good to hear your still out there FE, also good to hear your neck of the woods is having a good season sa far. smile its about time you SW farmers got a break from old mother nature.

You getting anything from the current system, up to 41mm on the westcoast so far tonight though I am thinking the falls will taper off significantly as you go inland. Looks as though Sunday night Monday looks like being your best hope for more rain, not that you need it though 12inches, wowzers! that fishing trip wasnt in one of your paddocks was it? wink
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2005 09:35

Hi FE, what a wonderful account of what you've been up to. Gave me a good giggle this morning, though I'm sorry to read about the bad events.

So that was you in that aircraft on the 27th? We're not too far south of the Sydney/Perth flight path and a little west of the Adelaide/Darwin one and some days we see some of the most amazing contrails.

Things are dry here too, with only 0.2mm in the last 27 days, but I imagine they're much drier further east. We're heading to NSW on the 27th of this month, so I'll get to see it all close up and personal.

My daughter and her boyfriend are droving cattle just north of Moree and she tells me that there's lots of green feed where they are, nothing like the desert of the west. They're droving 1000 head of herefords 5km/day and still leaving feed behind them. It sure will be a sight to see.

Let's hope some of those beautiful WA rains start filtering over this way. I'd even forego a few drops just so Heather can get them. wink

Anyway, good to see you back on board.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2005 09:42

G'day there FE

Great to see you stick your head up again laugh

I'm also very pleased to see that Global Warming , & Dimming & Brightening & Sun Spots & you name it has'nt got you.
Might be hope for us yet ! :wave:
Posted by: Tim S

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/05/2005 15:43

Any WA farmers not too busy at the moment out there? Going to be a very wet week for you guys, The word flooding comes to mind, but I thought that was word we West aussies didnt have in our vocabulary smile

Hopefully there isnt any serious lamb losses and crop damage for you guys tonight.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/05/2005 21:27

Great minds think alike there Tim S I was just pondering the same thing & wondering/hoping that FE has got his head down & is ready wink
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/05/2005 21:32

Anyone got any spare rain?. wink

30 days with out rain. frown
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/05/2005 10:55

Finally a little wet stuff our way. 6.2mm. Not a real lot in the scheme of things, but at least it put a bit more water in the tanks. laugh

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/05/2005 11:00

Hi All , Yes survived so far. Bar dropped from 1015 @ 10am yesterday to 1000 8pm last night so i thought we might get fair bit of wind & that was the case. Max gust 41 kts just after 8pm last nite and a couple around 38/40 bit after midnite. Only 8 mm of rain so far, but i recon we will get between 1/2 to 1 inch out of the system. Could get a lot of rain further into this week, & looking at next week think we could get a bigger shake up again!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/05/2005 08:19

Hi All
Good to read about rain elsewhere. Paddocks all around us very dry. Bore going full pelt. Usually switched off this time of year and onwards till about October. Just wondering where our underground water comes from and how long it will last at the rate it is being used by everyone else in the area, as they are all between one and five acre properties.Hope those winds over west didn't do too much damage to any of your properties. Great to hear from you again FE! Hope your wife is fully recovered.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/05/2005 09:42

Saw a fella on the Today show this morning talking about our weather and how dry it's been in the farming areas... I'm not sure whether it was tongue-in-cheek, but he was saying next year all those barren areas are going to see floods.

I wonder if he knows something the rest of us doesn't. Barren or flooded, our farming areas don't need either. frown

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/05/2005 09:48

Well, when we get a massive severe dry (and a long drought PLUS an el nino drought is about as bad as it gets) it often breaks in a dramatic manner, as though the flood gates are opened. 97's el nino, which was a shocker, was followed by a really strong la nina, where it just rained and rained and rained. My dam was full for the first (and only) time in its life.

My place is a worry. It's always dry here, we are in a rain shadow, but walking across it, the remnant grass was in little tufts (chewed down by the roos), and the dust around each was at a lower level... evidently it's blown away leavign little grass tuft islands. NOT good.

Jeez, when places like Yarrawonga are dry, that shows how serious it is. The murray is usually pretty good for moisture. Hopefully the bores around there are from acquifers related to the river. In Canberra, there is a big underground river (called The Red) which kind-of shadows the old path of the Molonglo, and has been reliable even in long droughts.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/05/2005 09:54

Take your straw !

Yesterday on Sydney ABC radio a gentleman from the C.S.I.R.O. who was the head atmospheric scientist said that since the 1950s there has been a decline in rainfall for the south west & south east areas of Aus & that this decline will continue.
A double whammy if you like is at the same time Global Warming that is known to be man made is inceasing temperatures & therefore evaporation on what rain is forthcoming.

Start chewing !

This morning on The Today Show Hayden Walker relating to the weather said that cycles come & go & come round again. We are having dry times now because of the lack of sunspots that dictate where rain occurs. The next few months of the Winter will stay dry but then rains will return to inland areas for the Spring. This is leading into the return of good rains again for the coming years & getting wet into 08 09.

I'm not up to speed in looking up these interviews if they can be found on the net but perhaps are there somewhere ?

Happy trails straw chewers laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/05/2005 02:18

Hi All, 18mm out of that last lot, about to get a few rough days again Thursday, Friday & Saturday and i'm a bit worried about another system due around 27th which my untrained weather eye makes me think could belt our south coast around here whereas these current systems are hitting a bit higher on the west coast.
Hey Helen glad to hear that your daughter has found some feed out in the long paddock.when i retire one of my aims is to try & tag along for a week or 2 "droving" - i'd have to be a "support" vehicle or motor bike, cos i don't like horses - theres never been one i can stay on and thats when its standing still eek shocked
Hi Gabby - sounds nearly as dry over there as it was for you up north! yes, underground water supplies do run dry - i saw a program about how the Arabs were using cheap fuel to pump up very old water to irrigate crops for pasture in the Middle East & quickly emptied the aquifers!!!
Mrs FE is much better - Dr recons that her balance in the middle ear was upset by the flying!!! i think that as usual we over did things too much on our plate, too much travel too quickly & a lot of emotion about...and still can't quite factor into our lives the fact that we getting older!
Yes Goody they are saying that apart from the systems we are getting now, there could be a drier than average finish to winter. Dry winters don't worry us here on the coast, but dry springs are not good news. Last year you only had to go another 2 kms inland from here and Spring hay making was very poor - we are just in that safety zone close to the coast & i had a good hay year.... thats the breaks - just don't take things for granted, i'll be very careful with the hay i have on hand just in case!
Well i'm getting tired of looking up weather charts for the next few days, what ever comes will happen regardless i guess so i'll just enjoy the finish of this Abba CD & get some sleep as tomorrow night could be interesting with strong wind & flash flooding warnings out already!
Hope a bit of this moisture makes it over the border & keeps going east - sad to see the big farmers drought meeting on the news tonite - felt for u all - especially Heather & David.
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/05/2005 15:07

Thanks FE
Good to hear from you again,I did wave when you flew over to the wedding wink
The drought meeting didn't seem to change to many,pollies minds though,then again what will?
Mr Truss minister for ag could only stay at the meeting for a couple of hours as he had other things to do :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
Whatever.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/05/2005 15:40

Finally having a bit of winter today.
About time to,still no rain though.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/05/2005 22:06

Hi everyone !

It did rain 3.5mm the other day it has been more cloudy & a bit chilly now...so as time marches on

Scenes such as these are happening around the Wagga Wagga district of late as farmers decide it is time to get crop in the ground in anticipation of a break in the weather.

A couple of happy snaps found Robert Gollasch at Wallacetown sowing lupins in .jpg Sowing dry
& Keith Lord from Junee getting in the last of his winter grazing wheat.

http://www.myozspot.com.au/Sowing%20Dry.jpg
http://www.myozspot.com.au/DSC_0034%20Version2.jpg

Happy trails !
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2005 12:32

Jeez, I hope those winter sowings come good. It's such a lottery for them, spending the money to buy and sow that stuff but it could be just food for the crows. I hope Junee and Wallacetown aren't as dry as ACT, although they did get that little bit of moisture, fingers crossed for them.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2005 16:04

2003 rainfall to beginning June was 107mm

2004 rainfall to beginning June was 119.9

So we are way off this year & these are my readings for out here no official ones.
New drought relief package out today hope it gives some people some much needed relief.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2005 09:38

Hi Heather
Would you be able to say what state you are in and roundabout where? What totals for rainfall do you have for beginning June for 2005? Drought relief package seemed to me to be a bit of let down. Surely there comes a time when farmers reach the point where borrowing more money just to live is not a viable option. IMO grants of money would have been a better way to go. It just doesn't seem fair that we can give so much to a foreign country and virtually turn a blind eye to the need in our own country.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2005 11:46

Hi Gabby
I live near Cobar far west NSW.
No June rainfall for 2005 as yet wink
Drought package hasn't changed a thing for us,still can't get any help it seems,now why does that suprise us :p but like you say if it can be avoided don't borrow or take anything as it always seems to come back & bite you somewhere wink usually the wallett laugh laugh laugh
I know it is supposed to be dry here,BUT not quiet this dry eek
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2005 14:20

G'day all...here at Book Book Wagga Wagga, since 15 Apr 2005, there's still only that 15pts of rain Goody mentioned. So much for an autumn break. The only way we can tempt the weather is to put the combine back in the shed. Congrat's to WA, well done, enjoy! We'll still try and sow in late July if needs be.. SB
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2005 15:32

The charts are starting to look promising for us. I've been saying for a few years now that the seasons seem to be getting later and this year seems to be no exception with the late breaking rains due in the next week or so.

One can't help but get excited as all the models start to agree with each other.

A cool cloudy day here with a magnificent red sunrise. Hopefully an omen that the rains are indeed on their way.

Heather, I reckon those ants in your creek bed might be onto something afterall. wink Sure hope so.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Thunderstruck

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2005 16:05

It is time fellas, Heather you will certain score your rain more so late fri or saturday. 20-30mm is distinctly possible. Best of luck for it!

TS cool
Posted by: Matt Pearce

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2005 16:10

Yep it certainly is looking good across a widespread chunk of southern Australia. Haven't seen rainfall potential like this for at least 6 months or so. I think the most favoured areas will end up being around the southwestern slopes of NSW and the northern ranges of VIC, but yep I would agree with TS's call for 20-30mm in the Cobar area.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2005 16:41

...and South Australia too, I hope, Matt. wink
Posted by: Thunderstruck

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/06/2005 16:13

Yer Helen but more so NSW VIC for this rainband. They will get greater totals, espec parts of Nth VIC where an upper trough stalling may just add some more instabilty to the rainband region.

TS cool
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 08:32

I think the whole thing is turning into a fizzer capital F
When I faint if it rains will someone please throw a bucket of dust over me to revive me ! frown
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 08:34

Good luck to all weatherwise over the next couple of days.

We're off buying super this morning and will gear up to get as much wheat into the ground as we can over the next week or two. We're lucky on the SW Slopes if only in that we can go in later than other districts if needs be.

I'd be thrilled with 10 to 12mm around Wagga over the next few days.

Again, best of luck to all and thank you for all your kind words, wisdom, support and encouragement during the past couple of dry months.

cheers

Simon

PS great pickie Heather

Simon
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 10:17

Fingers crossed, Simon that this is the one. wink

Goody, how about this dust for your revival?



This was taken yesterday, not too far south from here.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: bogong

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 12:40

Sorry put post in wrong thread..
Posted by: Thunderstruck

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 16:09

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
I think the whole thing is turning into a fizzer capital F
When I faint if it rains will someone please throw a bucket of dust over me to revive me ! frown
Hasn't even started yet! Saturday will be your day I'd think! Certainly NOT a fizzer smile

TS cool
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 18:36

Simon thank you for the offer of that bucketfull of Book Book dust ! I know you want it to be mud come Mon so it will stick ... ha I know you !

Helen likewise thank you but I hope over the weekend that dust is tenderly washed back into the bosom of your landscape

Thunderstruck you are right my local weather c/- WZ is now saying Sat is the day.

I am going truckie driving tonight to Ecklin South near Warrnambool so should get a good gander at lots of weather for the drive home tomorrow

Happy trails ! laugh
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/06/2005 22:39

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
I think the whole thing is turning into a fizzer capital F
frown
sadly, I'm starting to agree. looking at the maps, listening to the BOM.... fizzzzzzah!

Anyone want some dust? I always have lots of it, even when it does rain. City 4WDs get jealous of my car, and it's just from the driveway.
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/06/2005 11:07

know what you mean Ant. We're trying to sell our 4wd stationwagon and now have to leave in town with the in-laws because it gets covered in so much muck just getting to the front gate it'd drop the price considerably.

We got 0.5mm at Book Book yesterday, taking the tally up to 4.25mm since 15th Apr 2005.

Yesterday, for the first time in many months, our "rain bells" have started dinging. They're a bit of a tradition here.

We hang them in an alcove on the Eastern side of the house to literally "get wind" of approaching rain. There needs to be a bit of breeze to get them going. Anyway, they're still going merrily.

I don't think we'll pick up anything much here today from the leading edge of the trough but like Thunderstruck I'm more hopeful for Sat./Sun.

Am going to put my Drizabone inside out and leave it on a silo a fair way from the house to try and tempt it in.

cheers
Simon

BTW Goody, we collected a bunch of super from Rod Dennis in our truck yesterday in anticipaton of some sowing soon
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/06/2005 10:23

Simon how do you think your mud will mix with the egg that is on my face this morning ? laugh

I got back from down Warnambool way this morning at 2am & the road became dry at Culcairn with dust & hairy panic grass blowing about. The radar then showed some rain passing by to the west of us & I thought it was all over red rover.

So, much surprised to find it wet now with 11mm

My day is much happier knowing WW has had a good dolop out there
The ant should be right in the middle of it now to atm. :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/06/2005 10:59

Yep! I've wheeled out the bbq as it desperately needs a wash. Car is black again. Deck furniture tipped over for a wash. And I let the roof water divert into the poo tanks for a while, and then turned off the cock so the pipes start to fill and by now it'd be topping up my drinking tank, which was full anyway. It's got that "set in' look to it, too. I do love that sound of steady rain on the colourbond!
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/06/2005 11:34

Some very nice rainfall totals around Vic, NSW & SA smile
Goody, I was watching the radar last night & into the wee early hours of this morning (thanks to my husbands coffee brew :rolleyes: ). Some nice falls from Wilcannia (29mm), Bourke (15mm) through to Cobar (20.8mm) smile Hopefully Heather was under some of it.

Jules
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/06/2005 14:27

Hi Jules !

Hope all is well in your life & times up there

I just bet there were heaps of folk hovering over WZ on the pc's last night...I came to mine with a glass or two of chateau cardboard untill 3am.
In reading my mail a newsletter from the local agronomy business made mention that the last 5 months have been the driest on record.

Bit of a lull in the rain atm with 19mm now so that will get the crops up & going for awhile

Happy Camp Drafting ! smile
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/06/2005 21:58

I just kind of wish the colder weather would hold off for a bit, to give this rain a chance to get the growth going. When the cold hits, it'll stop everything cold, although I imagine further west things will keep growing.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/06/2005 12:43

Thanks for the kind thoughts everyone

I have been in Dubbo & it started to rain there Sat morning as I was loading the car to come home.
I was the nut packing my car oblivious to the rain & enjoying every minute of getting wet.
I drove through pretty steady rain all the way home & then got about 42ks out of Cobar & it really pee'd down.
Gutters running down the side of the road .....fantastic stuff I had fun driving through the puddles on the road as well.
It's amazing how a bit of rain turns you into a bit of a ""CHILD"" good thing I reckon. laugh
I picked 5 kids up in Cobar & we made our merry way out home & as I was getting closer to the dirt I was starting to worry a bit as there was a lot of water laying in the paddocks & on the sides of the road. Bit of slipping & sliding the kids loved that ...........& so did the big kid driving the car.
Got through the two biggest creeks with a few minor stops & starts mainly all the silt backed up ,the creeks were still running which was fantastic.
Got to the creek about 2 minutes walk from the house & the silt finally got us,no amount of reversing & driving forward would help.
Two friends who are here visiting for the week come down to the creek with shovels etc & finally after about an hour they pulled me out of the silt


45.5mm of lovely wonderful rain
laugh cool

It's all good & the grin is still on the head.
I am sorry for those who missed out & hope you get the next lot that is coming through.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/06/2005 15:16

Heather, that's absolutely fantastic news. laugh laugh laugh

See, those anthills weren't lying afterall. laugh

I'm so glad that you didn't miss out this time... bloody little ripper. laugh

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/06/2005 18:27

I think there'll be some corks popping NW of Cobar. :cheers:
Great news on the rainfall out that way laugh

Jules
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/06/2005 18:35

Hi Goody! laugh
Well, 19mm is certainly a good start smile There should be a few smiles around the district.

We're still buying in water & already got a few lick blocks out here & several at the breeder block.
:rolleyes: Never again will my husband be allowed to attend the cattle sale alone for "just a look"!

Jules
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/06/2005 00:22

Hi All, soooooo great to hear the rains finally got thru to so many places and to you wonderful people who have been waiting & waiting - hope you might even get some more moisture out of this real rough "good old days" system thats been belting the stuffing out of us with hail, gales & 83 mm of rain since Thursday - top temp here today was 10 degrees!!!!! we've used a big heap of wood this week & it will be gum boots & wheel barrow for a week or two because its too wet to use any vehicles in most paddocks around here now!!! Hope those in the Eastern States get some follow up rain to really make a long term difference to those bank accounts wink Quite a few farmers east of here will be battling to finish getting crops in as some have had over 6 inches out there this week - i don't know how Flame is going out Borden way - hope you have that crop in mate as it looks like more rain this coming week!!!!!!!
It really is great to all be able to talk to so many people about rain falling at last!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/06/2005 07:11

Hi FE :wave:

Be great if the weather goes back to something like "normal" in the next few months. wink

I was going back through my stats for here and interestingly we've actually had a smidge more rain than we did this time last year to date. eek Our average's saving grace last year was the 108.2mm we had in December.

Most farmers here in Mid North SA will be rubbing their hands together and breathing a great sigh of relief after last week's falls... it certainly made a difference to the look of the country with little green shoots of grass popping up everywhere. smile The Clare Valley got a good soaking and with the associate cold temps, so the grape vines have finally lost most of their leaves, much to the relief of the vineyards. I know it was a concern for many with new growth on the vines... so unseasonal was the weather.

Anyway, I do hope everyone gets the follow up rains and to those that had extremely good falls, much congratulations. laugh

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/06/2005 09:58

About one and half inches all up on the Book Book side of Wagga Wagga. We can do a lot with it.

This country will fly in the next week or two. Ground's still pretty warm. The spray unit'll have be coming straight after the combine to knock over the junk following the wheat up.

We had a new baldy calf born in the heifer paddock during the rain on Sat morning nearly drowned in a puddle!

First calf of the season and I'm pleased to report that it was male.

Lots of smiles in at the Co-Op on Sat. Much giggling and buying of "winter" boots. I even splurged on a pair of new socks.

Yes, the people are talking to each other in the streets of Wagga Wagga once more.

Lunch at our place yesterday started at 12.30pm and didn't really stop until we fell off our chairs late in the night as the wine and the beer took its toll on us all.

The rain bells are dinging again. Reckon there'll be a bit of follow up around here in the next day or two.

Ahhh.... some start up rain.
It was never in any doubt, was it?

Congrat's to all, great to read.

Hope sore heads out there similar to mine heal acceptably...

cheers, somewhat shakey...

Simon
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/06/2005 23:06

Fantastic stuff, Simon. laugh

We're still waiting for the proper break on the southeastern side of the township here, but the rest of the district has fared much better. The local pub's been doing a roaring trade over the last few days, so the owners tell me, with farmers celebrating their good fortune that it finally rained something decent.

Now all we need is to get the groundwater up and things will really be sweet. 9 bores in the district have gone dry and ours only has 3' of water left in it. frown We have a liner for an old tank due next week, so will fill that up in case our bore goes dry as well. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/06/2005 22:24

46.8mm so far this month. smile
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2005 09:51

Things are a little on the improve here with a very welcome 6.4mm to 9am this morning. laugh

That gives us 21.2mm for June so far and it's starting to show on the countryside with little green shoots popping up everywhere in the valley. Even the early sown crops are starting to shoot, so hopefully the rains will keep coming and at least winter will get its average.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: ando

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/06/2005 22:21

Ahoy there weather people
I live on 25 acres not much I know but i love it. I have my horses and my poultry and piggy and my daughter. I love the weather and am always looking at the sky hoping for rain, good lovely soaking rain, i work of an evening and look after my daughter and nan of a day. I got married 2 weeks ago and have been in beautiful Nelson's Bay on Honeymoon for a week. Came home and it had rained! I grow all my own food (did have 2 pigs) and I love working in my vegie garden which is a littl under the weather at the moment as I put the pig in there to help me with weed removal and the digging she has done a great job. Anyway thats enough about me, forecasting rain for tomorrow and Sunday, i even had 1 of my photos on the weather on channel 10 i was very pleased with myself laugh

thanks for reading and being very :cheers: [/LIST] friendly :cheers:
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 09:29

Ahoy ando, welcome aboard, congrat's on the recent wedding.

Sounds like a great life at your place.

Reckon you've proved it's what you do with however many acres you've got and how much you enjoy it that counts.

I also reckon it'd be harder work growing all your own tucker than running a cattle operation.

One day at our joint I'd love to have the nous to grow the perfect three-course dinner, French cuisine, wine included. Mmmmmmmmmmmmm....... Might have to the vines first, olive grove, oaks to get truffles, put up deer proof fences for venison entree, etc..

Anyhow, bon soir, back to the romance of our farm and cleaning out the back of couple of tip-trucks to grade wheat into.

s'later

simon
Posted by: Thunderstruck

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 13:03

Could be some more for you Heather, how much is hard to say but 10-15mm and maybe more is possible.

TS cool
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 14:42

Hello to ando laugh

I was a bit worried about what you had done to the pig there for a while !
Good luck with the farming...I am trying to break the habit myself :p

Glad you are getting some rain Helen ...I wonder can you park one of those big dish grain bins over the bore to top it up ?

Just on 40mm now since the start with maybe some more on the way from tonight as Thunderstruck has said.

I have been doing some more sightseeing down to near Warrnambool & Port Kembla with maybe Nimmatabel in the Monaro for Mon ....grass is slow to get away from my obs in most places.

Don't you get bogged over there Simon

Happy trails amigos ! :wave:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 15:11

Afternoon all
TS looking good for some rain ,hasn't started as yet but looks like it could any minute.............bring it on.
Ando we have friends who live at Mudgee they are on a few acres as well.
Simon I hope you do get to grow all those things one day laugh
Sounds as though you are still getting around the country side a fair bit Goody.
Pleased you are getting some rain Helen.
Have a good day people.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 16:24

It's just starting to rain here ,getting heavier as I sit looking out at the horses under the trees.They don't mind one little bit & either do we laugh
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 19:06

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
Glad you are getting some rain Helen ...I wonder can you park one of those big dish grain bins over the bore to top it up ?

Happy trails amigos ! :wave:
Thanks Goody and I'm pleased to report even more today... and with 10.4mm in the gauge, it's just started raining again. laugh

Heather, so pleased you're getting rained on, too. Just as well you brought in that washing, hey? smile Lordy doody I wish they'd put a radar out Cobar way so we could see what was heading to you.

Hope to read reports tomorrow that you've had heaps again. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/06/2005 20:42

Hi All, We got a very welcome 43mm here last weekend, and the wheat and oats we had planted dry is just starting to germinate.
We have been round the clock planting since Wednesday trying to get as much wheat in as possible before the predicted rain this weekend. Was just a very light sprinkle as I jumped off the tractor at 8.00pm with about 50ha left to plant in the paddock. I dont think the boss will mind if he has to knock off early tonight due to rain.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/06/2005 09:59

Great news DNO,I am sure the boss won't mind at all laugh
We had 14mm overnight ,that is a total of 59.5mm in the last two weeks ...........LOVE IT :cheers:

That is our 2nd highest rainfall in a month since August 2003 according to my records.
Lets hope this is the start of something good,like the end of the drought wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/06/2005 10:29

Heather, that's fantastic news laugh ... if this keeps up, you're going to have sooo much green feed come spring.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/06/2005 11:11

Quote:
Originally posted by Simon Bedak:
One day at our joint I'd love to have the nous to grow the perfect three-course dinner, French cuisine, wine included. Mmmmmmmmmmmmm....... Might have to the vines first, olive grove, oaks to get truffles, put up deer proof fences for venison entree, etc..
I dunno about wagga for all of that though! Southern Highlands or maybe New England would be a better bet woulnd't it? Although it might be a tad wet for the vines. I guess you could thin them. Or maybe you could stay in Wagga and outsource the Truffles to someone in Moss Vale.

My chihuahuas find things in the ground (they are good at snorking around with their noses stuck to the ground) so I think there's potential there as truffle hounds.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2005 16:43

Sheep alert for NSW/ACT regions! I think that means cold and wet enough to kill sheep?
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/06/2005 23:18

Re - killing sheep in cold & wet weather u might find it easier to kill the sheep on a warmer day - i find they seem to skin better than in the rain!
laugh :wave: FE

Again soooo good to hear of good rains right over Oz - another one and a hlf inches here over last few days - getting too wet to do much around the place now - & i don't really mind that! - bit unpleasant being rained & hailed on at Growers market for the last few weeks, but heaps of people buying at Growers Markets these days as more of the public learn that a heap of the Supermarket "cheap" vegies are coming in from China.......certainly not a "clean green" image there!!!
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/06/2005 09:51

Hi FE

Misting rain here atm with a 8 8's grey sky & a wood duck flying past my window while on the ground starlings mixed with green grass parrots feed along in the new shoots.
Can hardly believe my eyes as it is 'green'
out there now !


laugh Well we are in good form are'nt we ? re the sheep.

Tell you what I think that forecast would be right for today up there for sure with sleet forecast down to lower levels.
I went to the Monaro yest to deliver a semi load of corn to a farmer who will use it to feed his sheep as now rain does not get over the mountains to his area on the east side... snow was falling not so far off in The Snowy Mountains.

I believe the Growers market here held once a month in town do very well FE & Yes was a bit surprised from a Today Show story this morning about those imports. Now, that's a worry :rolleyes:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/06/2005 13:46

Didn't see the show about the imports, but what they do to teh local growers is no better. The big supermarkets screw them to the wall. if we can set up ways that the growers can sell direct, everyone will benefit. We've done that with our apples for years, but if the quantities were bigger, it would be a problem.
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/06/2005 07:23

G'day all, have been sowing/spraying for the past week. Only about 100 acres of sowing to go so it should be wrapped up by tomorrow or the next day. Surprisingly warm mornings here in Kyeamba Valley of late. We'd been expecting bigger frosts on our flats but it's been pretty mild so far. The mouse plague's going backwards but the foxes are still all over the place and the heifers and cows are set to calve, which reminds me. If you have to get NLIS tags for your cattle in NSW, you'll only get the subsidy if you get them thru the RLPB rather than the Co-op. That said, I don't think it'd be wise to sell any cattle for a week or two in NSW until the agents are used the system which comes into place from 1 July.

ant, I've got a couple of hundred oak seedlings started for the truffles from 500 acorns I nabbed so I might employ your chihuahuas sometime in the proposed trufferie in next 10 years or so, thanks for the kind offer. This week I'm looking out for about 500-1000 kalamata olive seedlings as well to help clean up a gully or two around the place. We put in about 3000 native trees last year here with Landcare but whilst you can make wattle-seed-flour, I reckon some roast olives'd go down a treat.

Have a crackerjack day all. Don't get me started on imports...

cheers and fond regards to all

Simon
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/07/2005 20:36

Howdy all. laugh

Speaking of foxes, Simon, we've had our fair share here... lost two good chickens last week as the opportunistic sods managed to sneak in before I had a chance to shut the girls in. frown

We set out Fox-off baits today and drizzled each one with some bacon fat. Our pest bloke reckons that'll bring 'em from around 2kms away... such is there keen sense of smell. Sure hope it works. Next on the agenda is a firearms licence for hubby and myself so we can sit and take pot-shots at them when they get too close. You know they're getting hungry (and cheeky) when they're coming up the driveway in broad daylight. eek
I'm looking forward to seeing how many baits have gone in the morning... hehehe. Our next-door neighbour will be baiting his property next week, which should also knock a few of them on the head.

Hopefully with all this rain, the farmers around here will loosen their belts a bit where hay is concerned... we only need one large square bale of lucerne to keep the two horses happy until spring. But they're holding on real tight for some reason or other... seems when someone mentions the word drought around here, they all go into panic-mode. :rolleyes:

Well, that's about all for now. Hope everyone is fairing as good or better than us.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/07/2005 00:06

Hi All, Helen those foxes will be most likely to visit your hens again on a rainy nite.....we have about 200 Guinea Pigs runing around the Park here, & have worst fox attack nites when it rains! your baits should work well, we can't put out baits becos of danger to kids and other animals in the Park. i have a fox whistle which i find is one of the best ways to shoot them - set myself up with shotgun & spot light and whistle away for 30 mins, usually get a couple of young ones ..... u might or might not know that another thing that keeps foxes away is getting your husband to take his "before bed walk" near the hen house and spray things around a bit!!(but unless he's a damn side stronger than most men it won't kill them foxes or hens laugh )
also good habit for getting lemon tree to make fruit....better end there or i might get banned!!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/07/2005 09:04

ROFLMAO FE, that's hilarious... but if it works, I'm willing to give anything a go (or at least make Graeme willing wink ). laugh
We had a little rain overnight, so it'll be interesting to see how many baits were taken. Not that we'll ever irradicate the foxes here, but if we can get their numbers down, I'll be happy. laugh

No fruit trees here of any description, it just gets way too dry in the summer and they don't cope with bore water very well. frown We are going to try and divert our grey water to what was supposed to be my fruit tree lot and see whether that makes a difference. smile

You get banned? Not while I'm a Moderator here. Unless of course you're very naughty. wink

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/07/2005 15:59

Foxes are bad in my area, too, they are everywehre. And the wild pigs are getting worse.
If anyone out my way used baits, they'd get peoples' dogs first, as the city types who move out to commuter blocks seem to think it's OK to let their dogs roam free. The sheep/goat/alpaca owners don't agree.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2005 22:27

Ant, we're not obligated to notify anyone of putting out fox baits here, just a sign at the front gate to say that poison has been laid and to keep dogs muzzled or restrained. As a courtesy I rang my nearest neighbours who I know have dogs (2kms away).

4 baits gone so far... 4 dead foxes... hehehe. One of the baits in our culvert has been moved, probably by rats, who also love the baits. smile
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/07/2005 13:30

Hi Ant
The foxes out here are really bad atm we have poisoned them but still seem to be plenty around.
We have plenty of people who like to come & shoot the pigs so that is kept under control.

I know what you mean about the dogs also if anyone comes out here with a dog they are told to get.............if they leave a dog behind we shoot it as simple as that,not a nice job but its not nice to see the sheep & lambs after the dogs get into them either frown
4 for 4 Helen pretty good hunting laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/07/2005 15:54

I see a lot of medium and large sized dogs trotting around our area, and every month in the local newsletter there's stories of peoples' alpacas and sheep being ripped up by dogs, but those loose dogs are still trotting down the road.

Mostly city people in my area, they move out to "the country" (inland of Bungendore!) for a few years, then they move on. New ones arrive, and so it goes.

I haven't seen any pigs in person, but I've seen their effects. And they were monstering people down in Canberra, in Pialligo. someone hit one on the King's Highway, and thought it'd be funny to prop it up next to the road, it was HUGE. And I have inherited a very large skull of one (complete with tusk-things) courtesy of the dogs down the hill I think.

I don't want to meet any, if I do I'll have to buy a gun. The big roos are bad enough, the big boy ones don't evidently regard me as a threat. I've almost barged into them as I pick my way to the house from the car at night. It's even worse in spring when they get stroppy.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2005 13:06

You don't want to hit a pig in a car. The car nearly come off worse! Been hunting pigs a few times with dogs. Biggest adrenalin rush I have ever had! Nothing like chasing somthing through the bush that could kill you if you stuff up!
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2005 15:02

I was out on the farm at Bredbo a couple of weeks ago and thought that my angus cows had gotten into the oat crop.
Got closer and saw it was actually about 15 wild pigs and about 20 piglets
Only had a 22 and could'nt get close enough so just scared the *%&# out of them with it

laugh
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2005 15:08

Hi Heather
I agree about the dogs.
As I work and live in Canberra I only go out to my farm a couple of evenings during the week and on weekends.
Was out there on a week day and heard dogs barking and chasing sheep next door. Rang the neighbour to see if he was working the sheep and he said no, so we chased and shot the 2 dogs.
They ended up killing about 15 sheep as well as mauling others. mad

Just lucky I was out there or it would have been a lot worse.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2005 16:44

Hi Farmer,
So sorry to hear about the sheep,poor things. frown It's a shame some people don't think of others every now & then mad

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2005 21:14

I like dogs, but dogs that savage sheep and other grazing animals have to be shot, and hung on the fence so their owners learn. Rough on the dogs, but it's such a huge problem, and they do it for sport.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2005 16:29

We found our resident Carpet Snakes sunning themselves today. smile
Wondering what the dogs were barking at & the snakes were curled around coaxial cable sunbaking.

Strange as it is pretty cool here today confused does this mean an early Spring?
Coming out of hibernation a bit early this year.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2005 21:42

Seem like it Heather! Trees that lost there leave's last month have bud's on them already and is even the odd tree flowering! Most of the plants in my garden haven't lost there leave's!
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2005 22:23

Soil temps don't seem to have dropped too much yet this winter - grass is still growing both in Melbourne and in the hills around to 7 - 800m still.....haven't seen that for a looong time!!!!
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/07/2005 12:57

Hi Jane
We have grass growing really well since the rain.
Even have to mow the lawn which is unheard of out here in the winter as the frost usually burns the lawn off.
Nice frost here this morning ,a lovely day today.
Might even wash the car later.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/07/2005 14:09

We finally lost our leaves and things during that long cold/wet/windy spell, and currently the jonquilly-things are out, but no big daffodils yet. Grass is cautiously growing, although it's too cold for it to really take off, and the roos are eating everything out my way anyway (which is good, I don't need to do anything!).
Actually all the girl roos seem to have joeys in their pouches. Despite the long dry.

I have a resident brown snake and wish I didn't, but only see him infrequently, usually on hot mornings in summer. If I saw him frequently, I could shoot him!
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/07/2005 09:48

Our first daffodils are out today smile
Ant we noticed lots of little joey's as well,so lets hope that is a sign from nature that we are in for a good year.
I heard in town yesterday that the cotton farmers near Bourke get a long range forcast from somewhere in the USA confused & they are predicting more rain for us. Not sure if this is reliable or just wishful thinking laugh ,hope it is true though.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/07/2005 13:47

Had to get the hose going this morning,the garden has dried out with all this lovely weather we have been having smile
It's been great to open up the house & let the fresh air in though.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/08/2005 09:33

Well shearing has finished for another year.
We had a good time at shearing this year ,plenty of laughs,great company ,ate to much,drank to much.
This is my last year of cooking for shearing so we had a bit of a party,even scored myself two boxes of chocolates as a retirement gift from one of the shearers laugh
One of the forum members & his wife came out to spend the week with us & assures me they had the best time ever wink
Now if the rain can find it's way back here again all will be rosy,as far as the land looking good.

Heather :cheers:

Heather
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/08/2005 11:06

Some loooong periods of dry, between those big rains. A really weird weather pattern. And just as I'm about to turn the irrigation back on, another weather system approaches.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/08/2005 11:17

I have gone back to work again laugh
Have some funding till the end of the school year so I will be catching up with all of you on the weekends.
More rain coming for Tuesday,by the look of things & we still have water in our creeks from the last lot laugh laugh laugh Gotta love this country & it's weather wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/08/2005 23:58

Hi All - Heather that funding is great news, hope u are still enjoying it as much and david can keep that bike of his out of the bulldust holes while ur away!!!
Wonderful season here ATM - drier than average winter followed that 9 inches at the break on 1st April - its been like Spring thru winter - lots of feed. i'm still being careful about hay though, as i recon we will have a "dry" finish to Spring and pasture could become a bit of a worry.
we are still waiting for the Govt to get on with the land resumption process that takes half the farm - they continue to fail to meet their own deadlines - May extended to June to July to August and last week we were told September - its just grinding us down not knowing when this thing will get finalised & we can get on with our lives - my wife has just had 2 weeks up at Coral Bay to get away from it for a bit & i'm still fishing so things could be worse and no doubt are for some others!
anyway on a brighter note i have had a great time with the footy tipping this year and have claimed one of the bigger cash fist prizes in town and won 3 others minor comps - think i might have won the WZ comp to - have to see tomorrow....so thats got my spirits up a bit, but i wont be picking West Coast Eagle for the Grand Final!
:wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/09/2005 10:00

Hi FE
Still loving it at school one of the best things I have ever done laugh David is resting from the bike while I am not home wink
Hope you get all your gov stuff sorted out soon so you can both get on with things.
We are also having a lovely season so far,nice change all round.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2005 14:28

Hi guys don't know whether I am wasting time here but a Xbred had twins early this morning and one is fine but the other can't get up so I put them into the yards, put the ewe down and squirted milk into the lambs mouth. Poor little bugger is really cold so prob won't work but I had to try.
frown
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/09/2005 02:23

Hi Adon, i don't know how far gone that lamb is by now, & u may know this already, but anyway in times of near death, i sometimes heat up a bit of nornal cows milk & put in a couple of drops of brandy - sometimes gives them just the little kick along to get going! Additionally we always have a can of that Di Vetelact powder on hand it is wonderful for almost any new born animal having trouble!
:cheers:FE
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/09/2005 22:53

Cheers FE but we put it down today. It got rained on early this morning and was just too weak to get going. Oh well better luck next time.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2005 02:48

Hi all, hows life "down or out" on the farm ? - i've had a few PC troubles of late - can't keep an i'net conection - competition has really lifted Telstra performance.....poor to poorer & verging on useless - glad i didn't have any money to buy shares....
Hey WW whats this "moving house" bit on your location thingy???? u been hit by some strong wind or something - or r u on the move???
we are still negotiating with State Govt on property resumption, should know whats what by end of November - looks like semi-retirements going to be a possibility which will please Mrs FE. if it happens i'll have a few months rest, i've been looking at a new "off farm" business venture - i recon its my last "throw of the dice" before i'll have to accept real retirement - who knows?!?
Fantastic season here on the south coast - absolutely perfect - feed everywhere - most of those with crops down here are confident apart from some worry with GM contamination in canola and some frost damage in places - overall looking good. price of wheat is very concerning for those further inland - price is rediculously low when compared what we were getting 30 years ago with cost only a fraction of today.......
my brother in law has just got back from a 3 week trip to China - what he saw has totally amazed & shocked him.... the amazingly low prices & cost of production and the huge growth of "wealthy" Chinese. he recons many that he spoke to are wanting to come & invest in Oz....ummm i'm still thinking about that ...what happens if we all sell out to them?????
well hope to see a post or 2 from a few of the old gang soon - i'm no longer a believer that "no news is good news' becoming a bit of a worry after having been to a few funerals lately wink
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2005 05:51

Hey there FE. laugh ).

So the Chinese want to invest, huh? That's a little scary. Even more so when you consider how the rich got that way... No offence, but I'm happy having a China Town in each capital city, but if they start buying up towns, I'm moving to EnZed.

That's about it from this neck 'o the woods. I'm just biding my time to 7am so I can take my very sick pup back to the vet's. She's come down with a mysterious illness, but whatever it is, the other dogs here don't have it. I'll keep you all posted.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2005 12:46

Hi Helen great to hear of a good season over your way. i'm sure the youngsters will find something solid to do if the economy is on an upturn with more people being confident in the farm sector -thats how it works here - thankfully not many droving jobs needed on the South Coast wink
yes i threw a sad yesterday and rang telstra to enquire about other alternatives to our land line - its so frustrating, & i can see poor linos are just as frustrated as me becos theres no funds for proper upgrade - sad situation in an organisation that provided such a sound & reliable service for so many years - now "the more efficient" bean counter, spin doctor Govts have to sell off infrastructure to balance books........i won't get on that bike.
the vet should be able to help your little fella, still might be an idea to quarantee him from other dogs for a few days just to be on the safe side perhaps wink we r having trouble with "c/virus" (can't spell calecee!?!) & our park rabbits ATM, but thats life & those that survive still know how to breed like bunneys very quickly. "c" if very effective killer - rabbit goes from well to looking very sick in 48 hrs & is doing more for bush rabbit control than mixy does now! anyway good luck there Helen nice to hear from u..
:wave: FE
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2005 22:44

Hi F E and all I thought I had better get off my butt and add something to the forum, it's been a while, I guess it's the rain we have had, 229 mm this month the best for 8 months.The dams are full and the creek is running, and grass growing before our eyes, we have even planted feed for the first time since June, lets hope it will stay like this forever. Last month we were seriously thinking of selling the herd, now we are looking to buy more breeders, marvelous how things change just because it rains.
Bye for now Joe
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2005 23:28

Hey Joe thats a great rain, "what a diference a good rain makes"----having to think of selling one month then feed enough to consider buying the next - that terrific news Joe!
Joe how does that new hip handle the weather change - a chap i know here recons its a bit like a built in barometer wink ?
u might remember that MF165 i had a bit of trouble with last year, well i had a fright last Saturday evening when i took it out on the road verge to push a bit of flood debris off the verge after waiting patiently for 6 months for Council to ignore it - i was real pleased with what i'd done when i decided to back out onto the bitumen while turning around, when bang the front wheel dropped off!!!!! managed to get back on the verge to find that the wheel nut had jumped a couple of threads & cut cotter pin - just what u need at 6-30pm on a Saturday evening......anyway no real harm done other than very dented pride and a few laughs from a few neighbours. new nut, new wheel bearings & cotter pin and we were away again...tractors getting like me Joe - falling to bits & worn out wink
great to hear from u Joe - hope the season keeps going for u :wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2005 08:13

Hi FE & all
Pleased you are having a good season over there FE,sounds as though retirement is getting closer wink for you now.
We had a good start to the season in June all looked lovely as some forum members can tell you,not looking to crash hot atm though with no good follow up rains & only winter feed.It has all but gone now & not looking to good once again.We have plenty of water but won't have much feed once the hot weather hits here.
We have partly moved house as I am at school full term also have been offered a few extra jobs here & there.I want to keep the school one as first priority,doing a bit of fill in bar work at one of the clubs a couple of nights a week after school.Have been offered to go into another business here in town completely different from farming more the mining area ,but we will have to look into that a bit more as yet.
We have our place up for sale & at the moment it is under contract so we are just waiting to see what happens.Nothing is certain till the dotted line has been signed,as you well know laugh
Other than that we are just enjoying life,to short not to laugh
All the best
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2005 09:03

well our season is finishng off rather wet! laugh Unlike you heather our feed is a little out of control ATM so have sheep in on adjustment to try and keep it under control! Wheat is still filling with this late season moisture so is better than expected. Barley is also doing the same but is a little more advanced so not getting so much. Just wish this season was shifted one month back and we would have ecord yields here. We had a dry pinch in Sept that set crops back and was very bad for some dry sown crops.(we won't bother stripping our dry sown stuff luck we didn't have much) Still looking at about 2.5t crops around here so pretty happy ATM laugh laugh just hope that after this weather is gone we have a settled harvest and it can do what it likes after that!
:cheers: adon
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2005 20:02

Hi FE and all,
I've been pretty slack lately too, not having posted in here for several months.
The headers started stripping the dry sown wheat this afternoon. It is still a little moist, but with the weather outlook a bit iffy, better to make a start, and dry it. Should get about 1700 acres off this lap, then a bit of a wait for the rest. I'm no authority on wheat, but they tell me it is looking like 8-9 bags/acre, which is about average for here.
I'm quite enjoying learning about farming since I moved here, but I am missing the the big storms, and heat of NW Qld, which should be starting about now. Also, I am not very impressed with these herefords down here. Seems every second one is blind in at least 1 eye. smile
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2005 23:08

Hi FE I guess I am a bit like your MF 165 I have got 2 new hips now nothing like a new part to keep you going,I don't know about the barometer bit but I do have trouble getting through the air port security, last time I was made to take off my shoes and all.All I need now is a new back and I can start life all over again. Retirement seems to be on every ones mind lateley my wife is at me to retire I could i suppose we have a house at the beach on Bribie Is, but i can't drag myself away from here yet.
Hi W W I am not happy to here the season for you is turning dry once again I was really hoping the seasons were going to break,just a couple of good years would be good.Tell me Heather will you miss farming,even though it's a hard life.
Hi D.N.O. we used to have Herefords and gave up because of eye troubles, have got Charalais now no eye troubles mabey just one now and again
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2005 07:36

Hi Joe,
Probably will miss the farming for a while,but we are both getting older & David cannot run the place by himself anymore.
He will miss it as he has been on the property all of his life but he is sick of going backwards. Drought & poor wool prices don't help & the bills still keep coming no matter what.
We all know about those don't we wink
He has been offered 3 different positions at various places in here if he wants them so we won't be short of work & he also plays golf 3 days a week. laugh laugh
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/11/2005 07:48

I suggested to my wife that seeing I worked the first 35 years that it must be her turn now.....just wondered if David and yourself had discussed this concept?
Your thoughts Heather :p
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/11/2005 13:20

Hey Dilbert u're a very brave man... that aside i recon Heather might chew u up a bit & i hope Mrs D doesn't have access to u're posts laugh
i recon retirement is really being able to decide what jobs u do when u want, i'm a bit frightened of stopping altogether thats when i've seen too many fall off the perch... frown
just finished having our hay cut & rolled (in between showers)- wonderful lot of top quality hay this year and it looks like being green well into December - i might even have time to go fishing again... :wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/11/2005 17:28

laugh laugh laugh
Dilbert I love people who like to live "dangerously" very strange thinking patterns you have been having I must say. :p
FE you sound like David about the "dropping of the perch"thing that is why we just slow a little, not to a grinding halt wink We are all entitled,we have earnt it laugh
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/11/2005 03:34

' recon retirement is really being able to decide what jobs u do when u want,'
.....now thats a concept I'd like to try :p

Heather, how does David go finding his golf balls in that country...... I believe it's difficult enough finding emu eggs :p
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/11/2005 17:40

Dibert,he invites friends to come for a visit,gives them a motorbike & away they go.It's the same with finding sheep as well :p wink laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/11/2005 04:21

Wish David well in his attempted retirement from the land Heather....maybe an increase to 5 golf days a week may ease his transition :p

"Dibert,he invites friends to come for a visit,gives them a motorbike & away they go" ........I've heard some of these visiting townies have a better sense of direction than your local musterers :rolleyes:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/11/2005 00:31

What can I say Dilbert????
I know you & mrs Dilbert loved the trip & you are both welcome to visit again.Any time...

pssss Today we held our anual Bushies V Townies golf day & the Bushies won>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> about time to.
A great day had by all.
It is our Mr & Mrs David & Heather
day to raise money to our local oldies home
& we will take the trophy to the village to show them next week & have morning tea with them.
I think they will be impressed as most of the residents are Bushies...........God love them.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/11/2005 04:52

And how is 'wrong way Potsy'? :p
I say again..."the best holiday I've had in all my life" and that was only possible because of the company that I had.
Thank you Heather cool
Mary-Ann spent 2003 on Mission Beach........2004 in britain and europe......but still maintains 2005 in Cobar was the best wink
....it's the people you meet who make the difference.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/11/2005 05:03

On this 'retirement home' subject, we have a similiar 'extension fund' going on for our communities retirement home also.

But what I was thinking was 'time share'......we could all swap nursing home beds .....and get a holiday and a change of scenery once a year.
Just a thought but worth consideration before we get to gargar to organize it :p
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/11/2005 07:39

Not a bad plan Dilbert.Maybe we should write it down somewhere so we don't forget, or so our families will know laugh

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/11/2005 20:48

Hi all Just returned from 2 beaut weeks at 1770 reef fishing and boating. Arrived home to find the farm drying out but have had good rain since, and raining atm from a storm.We have cows carving at the moment about 25 since Saturday, had to pull one out today came out backwards rear legs first, calf and cow doing good.So much grass around we can't find the calves, have to be careful driving around you don't drive over them. well better go watch a bit of tele.bye Joe
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/12/2005 07:58

Hi Joe
Sounds like you had a great 2 weeks laugh
Sounds even better the way you describe all that grass.
We trucked some cattle away yesterday,being sold today & tomorrow,they are looking good & the weather isn't so we decided to sell a few.
Hope the calving goes well.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/12/2005 16:48

Hi Heather
Hope you got good prices for those cattle I would say you did, cattle here are very dear at the moment. With all the rain we have had a lot of bur come up on the banks of the creek, so I have been out spraying,too hot in the middle of the day so do it late, up to 40de during the middle of the day.We are now looking for rain the place is drying out very fast, tip is for storms tomorrow.Hope so.
Joe
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/12/2005 20:17

Joe
Another let down with this system going through frown Hope you get on top of the burr problem,know what you mean about the heat ........hate it.
The cattle did really well ,very happy with the prices,the ewes & lambs go tomorrow & once again another good price for them,some one or some companies are buying up big.
It's all good as far as we are concerned wink

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2005 03:53

Hey Joe where is this 1770...is it like a secret GPS reading for your best fishing spot ? wink it certainly sounds like a good spot for a few weeks away - sorry about the 40 degree stuff - we are now in the restricted burning period & i've had a permit for the last 7 days, but its been too wet to light up anything! we had a poor girl from Qld who was attempting the first round Oz lady sailing thingy get hit by a few days of our southern ocean blasts, & she struggled into Bremer Bay after getting hit by some big waves - thats the finish of that attempt, she was lucky to have got to shore!!! certainly not fishing weather. while on fishing, last week my mate caught a 4' gummy shark (beautiful eating too) but strangest thing was he caught it on a squid lure!!!! he couldn't risk lifting it into the boat, so i gafted it & hauled it into the boat for him & thats when things got exciting, as its head went into the lunch basket & our goodies went everywhere - took us a good 10 minutes to stop laughing....
good to hear u have hit a firm market with the cattle WW, will u still be living out on the ranch for Xmas ? anyway good to hear some positive news from over that way from both of u - :wave: FE
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2005 08:33

Hi FE
Sounds like you had a good fishing trip laugh
We will be spending Xmas in town,thought the family would all want to have their last Xmas out there but they have planned other things ,I am sure we will all go out & have a quiet/or maybe noisy wink goodbye one day before the new owners take over.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2005 13:15

Hi FE
Yes 1770 is a secret place Captain Cook landed there on his way up the coast, and didn't till any one, until he got home. The place hasn't changed much since then, it is just north of Bunderberg on the QLD coast, the southern end of the Barrier Reef. The camping ground is right on the inlet and I mean on the water, just walk out in your boat and away you go.
All the best Heather for the future, I am a bit Jealous to hear you selling the Cattle and now the sheep, I think it's time I went too, our house at Bribie is looking better all the time.
Joe :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: Seabreeze

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/12/2005 16:57

I drove past the 1770 turnoff when I drove between Miriamvale and Gin Gin. To my memory the turnoff was only a few kilometres or so south of Miriamvale then around 50 or so kilometres drive from the highway.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/12/2005 10:13

Thanks Joe,
Time to enjoy while we can,although I have never been so busy laugh laugh I love it.

Heather :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2005 15:00

Hope you all enjoy tomorrow,have a great day & I hope it isn't to hot where you are.
Heather :cheers:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2005 15:40

Happy Christmas from the US. Here, they don't have Christmas any more. they aren't allowed to. They have to say "Happy Holidays" even though no one has any holidays.

and normal farmers can't make a living just selling their produce from the gate. Fair dinkum. Stories of how people prefer to buy their fruit and veggies from the big supermarkets, who buy their stuff from Mexico and all over the world. Can't they tell the difference?!!!! We sell our apples from inside our farm, and can't keep up with demand. People in Canberra and surrounds know the difference between a tree ripened apple and a picked-green one, and are prepared to go to some trouble to get the good apple. What is wrong with yanks? seriously. It's scary. They'll throw rubbish down their throats and take pills to deal with the outcome.

I miss home! Merry Christmas you lot, and never forget what Christmas is for, because without the Christmas story and all it stands for, all christmas is, is a greedfest of presents and eating. From where I stand, it's not a thing we need or want. I'm an athiest, but I'll defend Christmas as it should be to all comers. Don't let them take Christmas from us.
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/12/2005 16:13

Merry Xmas to all and a happy new year, extreme tempts here this week and getting very dry again.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2005 00:57

Hi All - Merry Christmas to u all, the coolest December on record over here - pasture is still lush green over 1/2 the farm, but poor fruit growers are having trouble as the cold weather meant that the bees didn't fire up & pollinate a lot of fruit trees!!!
Ant we had a double farmers market this week, thursday nite 4pm to 7 pm and got drowned, but still good sales, today a very fine day & one of our biggest for the year - i love our farmers market & see we are only 1 of 4 "true farmers markets" to be held weekly over all Oz!!!
Hope things go well for u Joe, don't like those temps already getting up!!! Heather & David i truely hope this is a wonderful start to the best part of your lives - the very best of luck. to all the others where ever u are good harvests, good pasture & good health to u all -
:wave: FE
Posted by: Simon Bedak

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/01/2006 08:19

Happy new year everyone. We're just about finished harvest, just 100ac of oats to go for our own use. Hope the crop lifters on the ancient Clayson 1545 work as the massive winds of late've knocked everything way way down.

Goody, I heard your voice on FireCom on new year's day. I was dressed in my clobber waiting for the call to get into it where you were but instead got a call to ride on Book Book One-Bravo to an incident closer to home. One way to meet the neighbours I guess. We're donating some rolls to the cause at Junee but the DPI or whoever's organising it seem to be wasting time coming to pick the hay up. Might have to organise some trucks ourselves.

Anyway, to all those in Chewing Straw, a happy new year.


Simon Bedak
"Lorraine"
Wagga Wagga NSW 2650
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/01/2006 11:26

G'day Simon,
You missed out on a pretty interesting day on Sunday. I'll bet you were glad that nothing threatened you're place with crops still to come off. Luckilly most of those affected had already stripped and trucked off their's, but still a lot of pasture and bales lost, plus the live stock.

:cheers: Will
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/01/2006 13:17

I was watching the news last night & really felt for those who have lost everything.
Lots of burnt animals in the film clip as well frown frown
Heather
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/01/2006 19:45

Quote:
Originally posted by W W:
I was watching the news last night & really felt for those who have lost everything.
Lots of burnt animals in the film clip as well frown frown
Heather
A very sad seen to watch. Most farmers were getting back on there feet after storms in Dec 2004 and Jan 2005

Worse was when Prime News showed the sheep getting burnt alive. Not a nice to watch. frown

A large truck load of Hay went though Leeton yesterday but still more needed.

A NSW RFS and NSW Police report into what started the Jail Break Inn fire in Junee should be released tomorrow.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2006 10:34

G'day Simon,

I have not forgotten the winery ...harvest got in the way.
The first thing I thought of when finding your message here was that I hope you "did" establish a safe area at your property ?

The fire here was just horrendous & it is hard to believe that it has only been since 1990 that the same thing occured. The start only being a few k's away on the Olympic Way & the ending at Mnt Ulandra ....only this time taking in the town of Junee.
There must be something in Mnt Ulandra ?
Surely the Devil himself

I have undertaken some incident documentation & at the early stage of this fire it jumped 183 m from near the Houlaghans Ck bridge over fallow into wheat stubble.

With 44c degrees a wind of 40ks/hr behind & Fire Index in the extreme of 133.9 little was in the favour of fire fighters.

Later at Marinna on the Olympic Way from Junee to Illabo the fire jumped 2.2 kilometres
This is very unusual for semi grassland topography.

Will get back to you about our trip

Happy trails !
Goody
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/01/2006 11:06

Photographs of the Junee Fire can be viewed by going to the New South Wales Rural Fire Service website & by following the link to Major Fire Updates
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/01/2006 17:26

Just as a footnote on this

For those of you who have snorkels fitted to your vehicles be careful driving through fire areas

My Nissan wagon caught fire with sparks going in my snorkel & did $8000 damage to the vehicle.

I only managed to save it by having a 9 litre water/foam extinguisher on board

By fitting a Uni-filter which is a fine filter made from a special foam this should not happen again...I don't think facing the snorkel head backwards is enough to be safe

Happy trails !
Posted by: Seabreeze

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/01/2006 23:13

Wow that was lucky of you! cool
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/02/2006 00:42

Hi All, cricky Goody i thought u were supposed to be putting those fires out, not carrying them about in your wagon wink well while u r all cooking over there, we r having our coolest ever summer down here....18mm of rain last nite, & for the first time since i've owned this farm we have had green feed in some places right thru from Spring!!! tomorrow i'm taking a herd of cows in from a chap further out who's a bit short of feed, to help me get rid of overgrown pasture - what a way to go....
Hey Heather r u back at school again this year???
we've had a huge School Holiday period in the park becos the weather was so cool, not many families wanted to go to the beach.....cartainly helped the old bank account.
Hope u cropping chaps have finished harvest - the farmers out east of here r still trying to get a few hot days to get finished, one chap told me he only got 6 hours harvesting all last week becos of moisture in the air. Poor people up at Lake Grace r still trying to get roads open let alone get harvest done - real extreme weather up there!!!
Time for bed as i hope to have my first serious fishing day for 2006 tomorrow if the westerly wind drops off a bit :cheers :wave: FE
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/02/2006 21:53

Hi F.E. sounds like you have had a ripper of a year,can't say the same for us, stinking hot and as dry as a chip.We are half way through our wet season and still have had very little rain 89 mm since the year started, plenty of feed in the paddocks and water in the dams but the creek is bone dry. I have baled 46 round bales so far since October usually have 120 in the shed by now. I guess we should be used to it now I think these climatic conditions will be around for a long time yet.
Hope your fishing trip goes well thats one of the pastimes I love.
See Ya Joe Don't forget your Sunnies cool
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/02/2006 22:48

Hi FE !

Just when I think you must have "upped & kicked the bucket" because we have not heard from you for so long you have to prove me wrong ! Glad you can keep doing that laugh

After another major fire here have to say I'm about all burnt out on fires for the year thank you very much.

Still have not got the Nissan wagon back as no wiring loom was to be had in the Land
Down Under & wait we must for one from Japan on a slow boat via China it seems .... it is due tomorrow.

I just don't believe what the weather is doing there "How can this be ?" What the heck just enjoy !

Land of Nod beckons
Ciao for now :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2006 17:35

Hi All, fire, drought etc - gee u chaps & chapesses are getting a rough deal over there this year - still got fires around Goodie, i thought there would be nothing left to burn out your way - hows the Nissan? - hope its going again. Also hope that Simon & BigW have survived what must have been a very bad season for fires out there.
i finally bought a Mazda Bravo - very nice unit, but very lightly built - won't last as long as the old 1979 Toyota, but i recon it will outlive me anyway - very pleased with consumption ATM around 32 mpg!
i wondered if those of u on the north east coast were getting any "useful" rain or just flash flooding - recon Joe might be teaching those cows to swim!!!
we are still locked into battles with Main Roads over land resumption of a big bit of the farm & Deer park - retirements not far away now, but i've just got some more info on fish farming - recon if i can't catch them in the sea i might grow them on land - should be easier to catch!
harvesting dragged on into March over here on the south and south east coast areas - hard to get one hot day to harvest each week!!! however now that autumn has officially started, we've had more days over 30 since start of March than all of summer - crazy year.....
hope u are all well, and hope u r back at school Heather!!!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2006 18:47

Just heard a NQ Farmer on the news. After losing most of his plants to Drought, now he has the cyclone, he literally broke down on the phone, it brought a tear to my eye....
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/03/2006 23:09

Hi Darran, yes, sadly that was what i thought might be the story.....we r not getting a lot of info over here mainly city damage etc - not a lot about rural outcome.....must be a lot of damage to farming sector?
:cheers:
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2006 12:29

Yes, most of the sugar cane has been destroyed, and expect Banana prices to soar, as there will be none supplied from FNQ for a while i reckon.
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2006 12:33

North Queensland crops wiped out by Cyclone Larry
http://www.nbr.co.nz/home/column_article.asp?id=14707&cid=4&cname=Business%20Today

A large proportion of Australia's banana industry has all but been wiped out by Cyclone Larry with farmers saying it will take years to recover.

The ABC says North Queensland is reporting losses of 90 per cent or more.

Industry group Growcom says farmers have reported hundreds-of-millions of dollars' damage to their banana crops.

Banana grower Naomi King says her property has taken a heavy battering.

The ABC also reports that sugar cane growers say it will be several days before they can fully assess the crop damage caused by cyclone Larry.

North Queensland produces a quarter of the nation's annual sugar crop.

Canegrowers chair Alf Cristaudo says the area has taken a battering and initial reports from severely affected areas are that the damage could be quite significant.
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2006 12:34

Link to Article
SYDNEY (Reuters) - A powerful cyclone pounded Australian sugarcane and banana farmlands on Monday, flattening crops and slashing expected production, industry leaders told Reuters from the battered storm area on Monday.

Cyclone Larry, rated maximum-strength category 5 with winds of nearly 300 kmh (185 mph), crossed the far north Queensland coast over the sugar town of Innisfail on Monday morning, damaging growing fields and buildings.

"There will be fairly significant damage to the cane crop ... It's been pretty severe around Innisfail," Alf Cristaudo, chairman of the Canegrowers organisation, told Reuters from Ingham, on the southern edge of the cyclone zone.

Sugar is by far the bigger of the two crops, and Australia is the third-largest exporter of raw sugar in the world.

But the effect on the smaller domestic banana industry was more severe.

Around 90 percent of banana production would be wiped out in the Tully area near Innisfail, the centre of Australian banana production, said Tony Heidrich, chief executive officer of the Australian Banana Growers' Council.

This would cause domestic shortages and price rises, he said.

The full extent of damage to the sugar cane crop would not be known for some time, Cristaudo said, as farmers further north rode out the storm as it weakened and moved west.

The eye of cyclone Larry hours earlier scored a direct hit on Innisfail, the main town in an area which accounts for about 25 percent of national sugar cane production in Australia, flattening and breaking the cane.

Cristaudo said it was too soon to give any official estimate of the extent of the damage.

Before Larry hit, Australia expected a slightly larger crop than last season, when around 38 million tonnes of cane produced 5.1 million tonnes of raw sugar, worth A$2 billion on export markets.

The cyclone-affected area also produces between 85 and 95 percent of Australia's commercial bananas, worth between A$250 million and A$350 million a year.

The industry, which for years has battled bids by the Philippines to export bananas to Australia, would not agree to imports to cover cyclone production losses, Heidrich said.

"You would not want to import bananas that may carry a pest," he said. "That would compound people's misery longer term."

Cyclone damage to the banana crop would cause the loss of thousands of jobs, he added.


© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2006 18:28

Can you believe it?????
It is actually raining :cheers:

And while those in the cyclone area are doing it hard tonight & will be for a long time,I wish them all the best :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/03/2006 21:24

Nice to see you getting a few drops Heather. smile Dry as old bark chips here with only 6.3mm for the month, but better than 2003 when it was only 3mm.

Hoping we get some good rains this year as we've now got extra hungries to feed with daughter Cheryl coming back into SA and us "voluntarily" taking on 5 of her horses. That brings the total back up to 7 and certainly not what we had planned for our bottom paddock. :rolleyes:

Sure would have been nice to get an oat crop in this year for some round bales... maybe next year. frown
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2006 01:45

Hey Darran thanxs for that info - gee banana prices rocketed quickly alright, even over here there $4.95 tonite!!! & u r still being theatened by this Cat 2 off the coast eek
Rain in Cobar! - wow everything is possible Heather!
Hi Helen there is a bit of interesting build up coming thru here tomorrow & Thurs so keep fingers crossed u might even get a bit out of that?? i recon thats a big increase in horse numbers for u, but i have a feeling its going to be a Easter break - heres hoping.... :wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/03/2006 10:32

Hi FE :wave: Fingers crossed. If the season breaks over or before Easter, then the rest of the year should be pretty good... Always said that if we get good rains by my b'day then the rest of the year will be okay for rains... this year it's at the end of Easter... so, here's hopin'.

Been talking to hubby and we're going to try and organise most of the crits off the place before sowing begins... see if I can't get the next door neighbour to plant something as we don't have equipment here on such small acreage. Anyway, will keep you all up-to-date on the progress of this new venture.

Cheers, Helen.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/03/2006 07:45

Good news about your daughter Helen laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/03/2006 01:42

Hey Helen looks like a good break to our season, if u can have a break to a summer where some pasture stayed green right thru - i don't know (never had this happen before)we've had just under 2 inches out of this system....beautiful......lit the fire for the first time tonite...lovely. Hope u get rain as a bithday present Helen - hey WW r u at school again this year or r u fully busy being retired??? hows David going?
:cheers: :wave:FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/03/2006 20:57

It is good news, Heather. Chez finally woke up and realised she was never going to get Dave to change... so it's back here to regroup and start her life all over again with her own car and licence... well, that the theory anyway. laugh ...of course if she'd listened to her Mother in the first place... wink

How are things fairing for you and David? Did you eventually get the Chrissy card I sent you (to the address Mike gave me)? How's the work going at school? Still loving it I'll bet. They're very lucky to have you. smile

FE, I went to town to shop today and was real surprised how green it is still, towards Adelaide. There are patches in the neighbourhood here too that are green with regrowth from the inch of rain at the end of January. No such luck for us however as we never planted a crop last year. Congrats on your nearly 2" of rain, well deserved in my opinion.

We're in that weird autumn transition right now weather-wise. Most nights are cool enough to warrant some sort of heating, but the daytime temps require air conditioning to cool the place... and being a transportable house, hot and cold affects it pretty quickly.

The charts don't promise too much in the way of rain this weekend for us, but further south down Adelaide way and below could get some decent falls. I'll impatiently wait as always. wink

Cheers, Helen
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/03/2006 09:43

Hi FE & Helen
All is well out here.Never been so busy & loving it laugh laugh
David & I have a major gardening project going in our new home,should look good when we have finished.All natives & drought resistant plants,no lawn,little upkeep=plenty of time to golf,read,play. :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/03/2006 10:08

Fantastic news Heather and you've got the gardening ideas down pat, though we've discovered here that if things are planted in spring they curl up and die by the time we're halfway through summer. frown

So, will David build you another pond? Should tell him to bring the one from the farm home. :p laugh

Anyway, have sent you a little email. Look forward to hearing about more of your adventures. laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2006 02:45

Hi All, good garden idea there WW, i recon best gardening tools r tractor, chainsaw, whippersnipper & roundup......Mrs FE does have a bit of a battle with me, but if u can't eat it i won't grow it - i recon fruit & nut trees make a great garden...
only joking actually we have some lovely roses etc...
thanxs for pm WW, good to hear alls well, i didn't get to send a reply, cos i've spent nearly an hour trying to re-register for footy comp & have got a bit mad with myself, off to bed now cos got early morning start for King George fishing trip in the morninf wink
:wave: FE
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2006 14:09

Gardening's hard up on my hill. Windy and dry (like, really windy). Roses (climbing ones) oddly do quite well up the deck posts. The best tool is an old Adze, the head clanks up and down the shaft, but it digs great holes, and doesn't mind the rocks, which outnumber the dirt.
I use it for making holes for trees, and for getting weeds. The wind and steepness makes spraying bloody difficult. adze just whacks them right out.
Posted by: silvercloud

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/03/2006 16:51

FE roses could be classed as edible as you can make jam and tea from the hips. laugh

:cheers: Jules
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2006 10:34

The change was a fizzer for here but I see things were a bit rough out west... A police woman is recovering in hospital this morning after the Police Station at Cobar was struck by lightning overnight.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2006 15:05

Roses taste pretty good, yeah, you just have to check them for aphids first. I'm blowed if I know how the aphids found us, but there they are. I leave them on for the birds to eat (except they don't).
I've been in the US since Dec 1, and don't get home until late April, and apparently the locusts have et everything, like last summer.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/03/2006 16:06

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
The change was a fizzer for here but I see things were a bit rough out west... A police woman is recovering in hospital this morning after the Police Station at Cobar was struck by lightning overnight.
She is OK Goody & happens to be our next door neighbour.Very lucky lady eek eek
It was rattling & rolling here last night wink
Posted by: Lottie

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/05/2006 23:35

The Hunter Valley (NSW) has just been told that ALL IRRIGATION water/allocation to farmers will be cut within one month unless we have substantial rain. No rain is forecast for the area and our two major dams are at 33%. Allocation ceases at this level due to the fact that we have 2 Coal Fired Power stations being supplied via these dams and they have priority over Agriculture. It now seems inevitable that we will all lose our water. I can't begin to imagine the impact this is going to have on so many people and industries.. frown
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2006 05:22

Maybe you need to get WW's little local action group that next time they have the caldron out to call on Thor again to deliver some rain this time. :p

Heather was this the considerably loved local police woman you mentioned to me once laugh
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2006 21:58

Lottie, that's terrible news. frown The Hunter Valley produces some of the best wines in Australia and I can only begin to imagine what that will mean.

So what happens to the power stations if the dam water runs dry? Makes one think a bit more seriously about nuclear power... and might give the farmers a bit more of a chance, too.

Dilbert, nice to see you here again. :wave:
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2006 23:26

Quote:
Originally posted by HelenSimpson:
So what happens to the power stations if the dam water runs dry? Makes one think a bit more seriously about nuclear power... and might give the farmers a bit more of a chance, too.
Nuclear power stations use water as well.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2006 23:39

But do they use as much? Be real interested to know all the details. smile
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2006 23:54

From what I understand they use water many times over and have a cooling ponds.

I would think that they use much less than hydro power. If the water coming out of a dam for irrigation is also used to power generators it would be killing two birds with one stone.

The only problem I see with nuclear power is the waste disposal and the danger of an accident.
The funny thing I find is that greenies want a perfect world when it comes to energy. Even if wind and solar power are used, they cry out about birds flying into turbines and land clearing for solar farms. Even if we all went back to living in tents and living by hunter gatherer mode they would still grizzle about too many fires and killing animals! There is no pleasing them so stuff em.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/05/2006 00:23

I love your way of thinking Adon, man after my own heart. wink

Speaking of hunter gatherers, we here (well me, anyway) are embarking on ways to grow our own produce in this summer-barren land of ours. Potted fruit trees and raised vegie patches look like they'll be the way to go here under a careful mix of bore and rain water. Plenty of horsey poo for fertiliser and the worms are in a tub just waiting for release and if the price of cattle ever plummets again, some Dexters or some Square Meaters (as my daughter calls them) might be the way to go for eating and some cow manure.

Thank the gods for a little acreage here... would hate to be one of the "towns folk" with no room to swing a cat.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/05/2006 22:31

Oh shuck Helen I am blushing! laugh We also have a garden and grow garden peas for ourselves in a little patch in one of the cropping paddocks. I also grow onions,(well dad does, I hate em!) tomatoes, potatoes, silverbeet, beetroot, beans, carrots, strawberries, corn and our own meat. We got a couple of truckloads of of feedlot manure and made our garden from that. It is very thirsty though and takes too much water for my liking so I reckn we will have to get some sand and mix it in. I reckon I would go silly in town as well. At least I can shoot any stray cats that I see!
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/05/2006 00:41

Quote:
Originally posted by HelenSimpson:



Thank the gods for a little acreage here... would hate to be one of the "towns folk" with no room to swing a cat.
I am a town folk now Helen but I still have room to swing cats & dogs laugh Grow our own veges,have a major wood pile,pick fruit off our neighbours trees till ours get established.We have known our neighbours for years wink

It's all good :cheers:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/05/2006 13:58

Hehehe Heather, that post has just made my day. laugh Hope to visit the new establishment one day. smile
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/06/2006 08:16

You wouldn't read about it,but we were to have our clearance sale last weekend & it had to be cancelled because of ,would you believe,"RAIN".

Hasn't rained out there for ages & it rained last weekend laugh laugh Not to worry we had a great send off & now as of yesterday are officially townies wink :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/06/2006 21:20

You picked it too Heather! You did say a couple of weeks ago that as soon as you were off the place it would rain.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/06/2006 01:09

Hi All, Gee Heather u had better come over here & get a farm in what used to be called the wheat belt, then sell it quickly & make it rain, cos theres going to be a LOT less straw over here to chew this year!!!! lot of farms in the wheat belt have either seeded dry & r still awaiting rain, and in some cases not seeded at all!!!!!! its the latest start to a cropping season i've go recorded - we once planted a crop in mid June & just escaped, but a lot of heart break out there ATM.
Once again our little coastal strip continues its best ever season, with green feed thru summer, & with a very abnormally warm May & June & scatters showers just now & again have the best pasture thru winter i've ever known. the only black spot on our radar is that if we don't get some real soaking rains from now on there will be a drastic shortage of water - that won't concern us as we have reticulated water right thru the farm. we still have not settled with the State Govt over our land needed for the new highway, but now know that we lose just under 50% of total area - just a matter of when its taken, the first stage of the construction now finishes right at our boundary!
anyway that will give me a chance to get over to east coast to meet my 1st grandchild & more time for fishing...
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/07/2006 22:10

Thought I'd share the local lad's tidy up

Chooks seem much happier wink
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/07/2006 22:17

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
Thought I'd share the local lad's tidy up

Chooks seem much happier wink
A cull no doubt :rolleyes:
Stuff happens. wink
:cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/07/2006 05:10

35 foxes that don't need feeding anymore cool the endless frosts here have certainly caused the foxes to grow some nice pelts.....but they are a little over-ripe for picking now laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/07/2006 18:11

Yeah got one with some dogs near the house the other night he was giving us hell with the chooks and sending the dogs mad. Full grown dog fox! Biggest fow we have ever got! laugh
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/07/2006 22:55

The only good thing about the lack of rain here has been the lounge room extension has been completed... well, the exterior at least. wink ...and when these winds finally take a hike, perhaps we can get the gyprock home to finish the interior. laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/07/2006 22:14

Well yet another crappy day waiting for rain. :rolleyes: We have channels running to fill some of our dams ATM so at least there is somthing else to keep us occupied. We are only getting one dam per 400 hectares filled so only about 1/3rd of our dams will have water. We still have to pay 100%water rates tho. They say "we have to keep our men employed". Can't help but think "we need to live!" We tried to get dams half full so we could have at least some water in more dams but that is common sence. So we are stuck with water in 5 dams but paying only slightly less than if we had water in all 12! I would love to go to AWB or ABB and charge them for an average yield even tho I only delivered a third and say "we have to keep people employed!". Reckon by a*@e would not even hit the the footpath while being kicked out! Why is it that only farmers would be ripped off like this?
Posted by: Lightnin

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/07/2006 23:34

Well said Adon...

Life is very frustrating at the moment, i nearly lost it in the years i was back home after uni... very depressing times... with the weather against us and the prices as well.

Doesn't make a lot of sense that all the costs involved in putting in a crop keep going up, fuel, fertiliser, chemicals .... but commodity prices are the same they were 20 years ago (not the same value but the same figure) - pity $100 in 2006 doesn't buy you the same as it would have in 1985.

Farmers have become so much better at what they do in terms of efficiencies and production with new technologies and equipment... but you can only keep working for nothing for so long..

We keep praying for the rain to fall and the rivers to run again... would be great to see the smiles on the faces again.

But we get through and the spirit of everyone in the community remains high. We beat the local footy team and we celebrate!!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/07/2006 23:36

Hang on your from Donald aren't you.... ENEMY HATE YOU AAAARRRRRGGHHHHH! smile just joshin but don't mention footy! laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2006 11:44

So who else has taken out a firewood permit this season?......I've bought a 16 cubic metre allotment of 'downed' green greybox and ironbark from the local national park (5kms away) and am just starting to bring it home ahead of this rain.
What I was wondering was who else has this sort of State firewood deal going on ....or is it just in Vic.
Green timber thinnings is all that will be available next year in Vic which means you need to keep ahead of the game.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2006 12:43

My brother got one last week for redgum in his he was only allowed to cut down wood that any hollows were less than 400mm. That was near koondorook on the Murray. Pretty good price for that amount of wood.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2006 12:46

Not aware of any such deal here in SA, except for those already contracted to take firewood. We've been pruning out our dead (non-hollow) branches and finally demolished that fateful gum out the back... Graeme was so brave, but as fate would have it, he won a Husky Rancher, so decided that tree would be good to christen it on.

Next year should see us with a whole bunch of old fence posts (no creosote or arsenic) to burn for the winter. smile Would like to grow some paulonias here for firewood, but they like lots of water apparently, something lacking in these parts.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2006 14:57

old bloke sized logs wink

......and a beautiful sunny day to be out in the forest smile
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/07/2006 15:25

Good load there dilbert! Bet your back (and the ute)knows that as well wink My brother was on a camping weekend and decided to get some on the way home but the silly bugger cut them to size over there!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2006 14:50

Well 20mm or there about for here out of this! laugh not a puddle to be seen out on the paddocks! Best rain here since Feb and hopefully we can get a follow up soon and get things happening around here. This rain has saved a hell of a lot of sheep from the sale yards and will make life one hell o a lot easier!
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/07/2006 15:11

So pleased you got a decent drop, Adon. Lord knows you deserve it mate. laugh Not quite so lucky here with only 7mm all up. Still, better than dust rising out of the paddocks and it should help the natural grasses grow again. Even our little wheat crop is standing up looking a bit happier and with clay soil, the bit of moisture should hang about for a bit. smile
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 11:52

WoodJob scores
Meterage 5
Punctures 4
....three days lost to rain .....play to resume when the wicket drys out wink
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 12:07

This National Park deal is 'household'.....however there is provision for a forestry licenced third party to collect your allotment for you.....lots of people still using solid fuel stoves out here and you can buy a cooking stove allotment also ....areas marked in the forest specifically for 'small timber' for these users.
This is a household allotment that is offered and you only need apply to the local NRE guy in Vic to find your nearest place that is having manicuring work done on the forest .....it's all in the forest interest to mature with thinning .....so as to have many and varied stages of forest through the state I believe ......but the woods welcome and legal for a change wink
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 14:01

Jeez, can that ute cop that load? I take the F150 cab-chassis (big wooden tray) to buy my wood, and a double layer over the entire tray has the springs groaning and tyres bulging.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 16:56

This things a wreck so it don't matter laugh ....I put an old set of wheels and tyres on as I was fearful I'd spike my 'good' tyres ....but that didn't work and I'm back on the good ones :p
She creaks and growns as she rolls down the track but i can get in close to the wood unlike using the truck and it's the only tipper I have...bit small but a few metres at a time knock me up anyway.....and being able to tip it off is the only reason I keep the old girl in the first place.....she owes me little wink
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 17:28

I think I will have to have enquiry Dilbert :p
To much pressure for the old ute wink
Hope the driver wasn't spinning out of control with that loaded laugh laugh :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/07/2006 18:07

It's the headspins after the exertion of loading it .....but a sit down with a ciggie fixes that :p
About 2.5 metres at a time is all I bring home now and thats with a small trailer on.

Even had some help today cool but I was made to cut little ones.

Funny how you can enjoyed getting back to the basics while not just swipeing a card on the gas bill cool
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/07/2006 07:37

Your helper looks very familiar laugh laugh laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/07/2006 07:46

:wave: I've passed that on wink

I just love the woodjob...only an excuse to get out in the forest :p
On top of that you can't beat an open fire for warming your feet cool
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/08/2006 23:33

Wood fire (slow combustion) is the only heating in my house. It works, but, I get home around 6.30 or later, and it just takes to long to get it going, and it is only just warming the house by bedtime. So I don't bother and sit watching TV with a rug over my head.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/08/2006 00:22

Yeah unless the day is really cold we don't have our fire box going during the day. We usually put a big log on last thing before bed and in the morning we get the fire going from the left over coals and then put another good one on and leave it until late in the day. We then get the fire really going with small stuff and then by about 8.00 it is pretty warm (24c) in the lounge but getting the rest of the house takes a bit longer. We have a fan forced one though. But it is really hard to get really warm on bad, frosty nights.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/08/2006 09:04

Mine works well, as long as it's on. But I don't like running it when I'm not here, and don't need it when I'm in bed. So it doesn't get used a real lot! I stoke it up when the family and friends are coming for lunch or dinner, but they still moan about how cold it is (while I'm sweating).
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/08/2006 13:38

Our hotbox runs 24/7 this time of year (hard frost this morn) keeping the central part of the house warm ....shut right down at the moment and the house is wide open with the sunny day ...but still holding a nice core temp and coals and I guess we are lucky the main chimney is smack in the middle of house.
If the war office would let me cut the ceilings I'd put a cheaper (and 12volt) version of these heat tranfers fans to each bedroom...definitely the answer for us.
Well Ant you obviously don't have to get up twenty times a night laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/08/2006 15:40

Quote:
Originally posted by ant:
Mine works well, as long as it's on. But I don't like running it when I'm not here, and don't need it when I'm in bed. So it doesn't get used a real lot! I stoke it up when the family and friends are coming for lunch or dinner, but they still moan about how cold it is (while I'm sweating).
You sound like my brother when he comes home. He is SO tight that hime, his wife and 7 month old daughter live in 16c and think that is comfy! He calls home "club tropicana" cos we keep the house pretty much in the mid 20's all the time. Then again we have all the wood we will every need so it doesn't cost us anything. Maybe if we were paying for the wood it would be different.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/08/2006 05:01

The War Office here (I did use caps wink )says I am coldblooded because I keep the house warmer than she indoors requires.....then again in this area you need to get before lunchtime to see and feel the frosts :p
..so glad the boss doesn't use the internet laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/08/2006 05:28

I could go on about how the local farmers become intinerant worker and go fruit picking/pruning to sometimes pay the farm fuel bill frown

well Bridgewater vineyards are just being pruned at the moment by a team of about 20 workers that have been shipped in from overseas and are apparently working for $12 /hr

Now I know the grape price fell in half and most vineyard are into an end game ....as the national crop enlarging all the time as new vineyard mature things will get worse......but I fail to see how this new idea of importing labour is going to help the nation as a whole ....making our businesses viable by not using aussies defeats the purpose in the first place I would have thought

and please lets leave any racist remarks out of the thread as it has no place in this issue.

I haven't figured Howards thinking behind this 'giving away what little jobs left' but my personal feeling is that it will be misused by business and industry anyway.....it's supposedly to cover the shortfall in skills......for christ sake this is pruning grape vines in Bridgewater and I'll guarantee they already have an over abundance of pruners and pickers in the local population.
I'll investigate the claim of $12/hr today and see how true it is.
I'm not saying $12 is the crime ...lots work for heaps less around here.....they're farming ..and some would gladly take anything.

Anyone else have their caravan park full of international visitors doing the local chores??
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/08/2006 12:06

(sent before finished. pity we can't delete).
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/08/2006 12:11

I agree, Dilbert, wholeheartedly.

I work in the US every year ski instructing, and I've had a good look at how it works over there. They have a huge dependance on "guest workers" from places like mexico. They claim they "must" bring them because they do jobs Americans won't do. They neglect to mention that this is because Americans can't AFFORD to do them. Because the wages are so incredibly low.

I can see us following a similar path unless we are very careful.

If they can bring in people from overseas, why can't they bring them from other parts of australia? There are places with higher unemployment, or numbers of workers whose skills aren't in demand. why not move them to areas needing harvest workers or whatever? I'd go bail that the pay issue is at the crux of it.

Certain industries have used sponsored visa workers for years, even though there are lots of qualified aussies in situ. I don't understand how they get away with this. When the CES existed, they had the job of doing the labour market tests for employers wanting to bring in workers, and I saw so many dodgey applications (and ensured Immigration knew that they were). I don't think anyone does this job now.

This importation of workers is industry-driven, and it's not for the good of the country.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/08/2006 13:01

The thing is that most of the people who are unemployed DO NOT WANT to do these types of jobs. I is the same in the UK. Immigrant workers are virtually the only ones doing low level jobs like street sweeping and other crap jobs. There are plenty of people to do them in the UK but they CHOOSE not to do them. I worked with furniture removalists while I was over there. Yes it was the hardest I have ever worked and the pay was not that flash but all but 2 of us were foreigners because the guy was sick of trying to get locals.

There are heaps of people in Swan Hill on welfare and yet there are loads of fruit picking jobs going up there. And there is also loads of foreign workers both illegal and legal up there. Even here in my home town, the machinary dealership was trying for ages to get mechanics to work here. We are not that far away from bigger towns but nobody would take up the job. They ended up getting 2 mechanics from the Phillipines and could not be happier with them. I don't know how muchthey are paid but by the sound of the owner he would be happy to be paying them more than the locals!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/08/2006 16:58

Well pretty sad day here. frown Went to a friend's funeral today. He was killed last week in car accident. Half of the town(if not more) turned as well as a lot of faces I have not seen for a long time. Was such a nice day aswell but so sad.
frown frown frown
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/08/2006 22:48

Might want to catch Stateline on ABC TV tomorrow night....7.30pm...have been told that David Miles may be interviewed.......
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/08/2006 13:09

Who is David Miles?
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/08/2006 13:14

David Miles is the person who is Aquiess.......
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/08/2006 14:11

I googled him when I read your post Jane and didn't have much luck.....but it rang a bell.
I'd been reading the Aquiess thread tooo shocked ....then again I can't recall ever passing English Comprehension smile
Posted by: TrenthamStormchasers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/08/2006 15:33

I would have put it in the Aquiess thread but I couldn't find it :nerd: (btw, I failed trial School Cert english, so I have no chance either...)
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/08/2006 21:17

That was on Vic Stateline, I gather? Was still at work at Stateline time, so missed it. We get our very own ACT region one, which is nice.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/08/2006 23:44

Well getting pummeled by wind all day today and still getting thumped by gusts now. How have other fared out of this?
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/08/2006 10:34

Same here, the big wind arrived this morning, after a "normally" windy day yesterday. This stuff is savage, smashing against the house. Warm, too. Bloke in Wagga in the NSW weather thread said he could see the front coming from the west so hopefully there'll be something in it, the dust is blowing like smoke here.
Posted by: Rainlover

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/08/2006 11:30

Dug in some wheat I had growing this morning, the soil was very dry. The wheat started going to seed last week.....

Rainlover
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/08/2006 11:58

Quote:
Originally posted by Rainlover:
Dug in some wheat I had growing this morning, the soil was very dry. The wheat started going to seed last week.....

Rainlover
Where do you have wheat? It's ALL dry, no good spots anywhere in the state now. frown
Posted by: Rainlover

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/08/2006 15:22

Was growing it, we have had just enough rain here to keep it going

Rainlover
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/08/2006 19:12

After you said that I had a look at the neighbour's early sown wheat. The head has already formed and is pretty small. The plants are stressing like crazy ATM and will only get worse with the weather getting warmer. That crops will only maybe .4t/ha now. Less than a third of average. Considering that he spent at least $300/ha, he is looking at one very bad year as this is one of his better crops. Just go to show that cultivation doesn't pay!
Posted by: roves

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/08/2006 12:14

Our crops are holding on for now although they stopped growing if we could get 10mm this week we might still get 1t/ha. Still cant believe how this year is turning out starting to think these dry-drought conditions will become the norm with the odd wet spell to give ya false hope. frown
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/08/2006 13:31

Well just saw the first dust sweep through the barley behind our house frown didn't expect to see that today. WAS sounding good for some rain tomorrow but now going south again. frown
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/08/2006 16:14

During the big wind with the last system, I saw a large procession of dust going over my place.
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/08/2006 20:34

Even crops on North Yorke Peninsula SA starting to yellow & brown & burn off around the edges and look pretty crook now. And they are in the lucky SA areas that did get a reasonable amount of rain earlier.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/08/2006 09:13

Crops & pastures alike stressed for a drink here now but not that bad yet. Travelled up past Coonabarabran last week & can say that all crops etc are at about the same maturity as here...After reading the breaking weather for SA just now I'm not expecting much if anything out of this change. All looking pretty grim !
Happy trails !
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/08/2006 09:34

Dad has been in Canberra for a week or so seeing his first Grandson. Reckons it is as bad if not worse up there than it is here. He reckons it only improves when he got to Cowra.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/08/2006 09:50

Time to sell out Adon & buy in at Warrnambool if you want to keep farming ...Get as far south as possible :rolleyes:
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/08/2006 12:44

Yep, Canberra/Monaro seems to suffer from being in the lee of the main range/s. I don't know how farmers in the Monaro do it, it's been so dry for so very, very long. When you head north, the climate seems to change as soon as you hit the interesting hills/gorges from Goulburn onwards, you get more rain happening, and that increases into the highlands (Bowral and Mittagong).
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/08/2006 23:23

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
Time to sell out Adon & buy in at Warrnambool if you want to keep farming ...Get as far south as possible :rolleyes:
You know what will happen tho Goody. As soon as we sign the paper it will start P*ssin down! Think that happened to a ceratain lass in Cobar didn't it! wink
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/08/2006 09:54

Yes I think it did for a little while Adon

I came across your post a moment ago about not getting the header out & a job falling through. Sorry for you that it has come to this.
It looks like the way things are going there will be plenty in this boat...Here in my part of NSW as well.
If Spring rains fail & we won't be long finding out, this is going to be a monumental disaster. I say this because most crops are not sufficently advanced yet to mature to any extent, thus providing an income from turning them into hay.
Adon I no longer drive trucks due to ill health which I was doing albeit on a casual basis, but I know everywhere they are crying out for drivers so that could be worth a look. Two or three trips a week when you have a farm at home is good money.
No trouble Making $1000 for a 5 day week if you want.
Also Mining is short on labor & the pay very good but of course you will have to leave home ?

I have sold nearly all of my farmland to a neighbour keeping just 120ha about the house. I did this for a number of reasons one of which was as much as I like it I could not afford farming.
If this one fails & we go into an El Nino induced drought next year it won't take long for land values to begin falling.
I would like to see it raining plenty over the Spring but I don't think it is going to happen.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/08/2006 21:36

Actually there are two mineral sands mines starting up within 40km of here within the next few months/years. One has to wait until the water situation is better but the other one has access to ground water so will get going by years end(rumor has it) have been looking into getting on these mines but bit difficult as they use contractors to do the mining so you have to find the right contractor do get on with. I have a cousin who is in the mine down Hamilton way he reckon I might have a chance to get on there in Nov but would prefer to get on closer to home. I was going for a Machinary sales job in Swan Hill so understand why they pulled the job.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2006 08:29

There isn't a wether in Arnold now...all gone to the market @ $20/head and these local guys are now in complete drought mode.
Not a crop in the district worth putting the header into and now with this overnight rain, these blokes are ploughing in failed crops.
Must be heart breaking frown

88 points overnight which is welcome but a little late.
Hope you received a similiar freshen-up Adon smile
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2006 21:40

Yeah did have a very good rain up here Dilbert! 105 points so yeah very happy! We are lucky our crops were not really badly stressed and will take off now. Will get SOMTHING now! Although notlooking to make a fortune may get the debt sorted fingers crossed for a few more of these events before Nov! smile
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2006 22:21

Rain out there at exactly the right time. surprised they didn't issue an alert for sheep weather around here though, it's bloody cold and windy, might even get something more solid. Sheep won't be happy, lambs might not survive.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/09/2006 12:37

Yeah we were a bit worries about some sheep we were shearing yesterday. Wind was pretty strong and rain coming down. But we fed them and kept them around some timber and they seem to be fine.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/09/2006 09:23

Very pleased to hear your rainfall report Adon
All are very happy about these parts with 20mm being the eventual end to proceedings. As the root systems have not developed very well becuase of the dry season some concerns exist as to the eventual yield ? Needless to say that yield is still going to be down but quality hopefully will be up with some more rain.
Happy trails ! laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/09/2006 10:03

yeah secondry root system has not really developed yet but this rain will kick it along now. Had a dig in the paddocks yeaterday and the good news is that we have usful moisture down to about 40cm now. smile we had moistur down out of the reach of the plants before the rain but is is all joined up now so hopfully with a storm or two we should be able to get somthing out of this.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/09/2006 09:11

No little red legs Adon ....rampant in our lucerne patch at the moment frown ....I gave 'em a big drink though wink
Posted by: roves

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/09/2006 10:35

Glad to hear you got a nice drop Adon not so lucky up this way with 5mm total and with all the wind of late we are back to where we were and no rain within a fortnight will spell the end for this year.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/09/2006 14:11

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
No little red legs Adon ....rampant in our lucerne patch at the moment frown ....I gave 'em a big drink though wink
Na not really Dilbert but keeping an eye out for them. Plants up here are a little too far along for that now but the clover in the pasture may cop them. Never really had huge problems with them apart form fencelines any way. Only thing to do really is spray them but dunno if yours is worth the trouble. They are red legs and not lucerne flea?

Yer Rove amazing how it works out eh? I remember being green with envy hearing aboput your rain a while ago but while we are not WET we sound better off than you. Just proves you cannot count your chickens eh? frown I also hear WA is having a shocker. Hope next year is a biggun 'cos prolly not many farmers will be around if we have another dry year.

Funny though I was talking to a bloke I used to work for on the weekend, he wanted me to drive do his cropping next year. I asked him why his son wasn't going to do it he sidestepped that and offered me $1.10 an acre to drive HIS tractor! Go figure!
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/09/2006 07:39

Everythings sprouting in fits and starts with the odd rain Adon and I think thats why the bugs are abundant on any new growth ...not enough bugs in the paddock to bother with.
They are redlegs....my understanding is fleas are about three times the size and brown/yellow while redlegs are black, tiny (less than 1mm) and have quite bright redlegs....easy to see in morning light.
I won't be spraying Adon, it anything it needs stock as it's lain fallow for 10 years and needs a few steers on it.....shame it's fences are knackered :rolleyes: laugh
Posted by: Alexia

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/09/2006 19:43

How much an hour is that?
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/09/2006 23:15

Quote:
Originally posted by Alexia:
How much an hour is that?
Umm what are you talking about?
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 01:28

If he's raking straw on the fergie.....about $2/hr .....while if he's mowing in road gears it may be a different story :p
and stripping works backwards...the slower you have to go, the more you both make wink
Posted by: Alexia

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 06:58

adon you were offered $1.10 an acre to drive.How many acre's can you cover per hour?
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 09:16

On the ACT Region ABC TV news last night, they showed the wheat "crop" in the Mallee, hardly even out of the ground and losing ground fast. I think it's going to be a shocker for them this summer.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 10:07

I hope Adon comes back on soon

Hi there Alexia !
Sure is a lovely place where you live :wave:
Posted by: Mikezoom

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 10:11

Hi Alexia, how have you fared with rainfall so far this month? Going to pop over for one of the familys wedding's this month, would love to take some pics of the green valleys once again (hopefully they are green frown ).

Mike.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 12:40

Quote:
Originally posted by Alexia:
adon you were offered $1.10 an acre to drive.How many acre's can you cover per hour?
Oh sorry 'bout that. Use quotes to avoid confusion! smile He uses a 15m seeder and travels about 12km/h works out around 45acres/hour. So talkin $50/hr! But every 2-3 hours you have to stop to fill and that can take 30min and shifting paddocks can be a hold up but reckon $45/hour would be a good target! I reckon he thinks that I wouldn't hold him to it but I have been offered $1/acre for real so he will have to beat that. I have to add though that even if I drove the tractor for every acre, I would only get about $7700. The season he was talking about only goes for about 2 weeks. He by no means is talking about full time stuff. I am not THAT valuable! wink
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 12:43

'Tis a rare bird to see out here but the Channel Ten chopper just went screaming past heading for your place Adon obviously on a mission.....what have you been up to? :p
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 12:47

Dammit have to hide the secret crop! laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 12:48

...the cash one laugh laugh
Bugger, now I will have to watch the Ten news tonite :p
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 12:53

But now I think about it my wifes out on that road near Wedderburn at the moment ....touch wood it's not a road accident
....and is some good news for a change wink
Posted by: Alexia

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 13:31

THANKS adon I have read your posts for three years now and really feel sorry for the conditions you have been trying to farm in.To me that didn't seem like much money.Mikezoom we have had 19.5mm so far this month missed rain on the 6th only 2mm. We have had 289mm for the year to date [average rainfall 800mm]The valleys look beautiful but we have had no run off.We have had couple hot days grass wilting under trees.People are getting very worried about water even here,a lot of dams are very low.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2006 22:32

Hi Alexia, feel a little blush to know that you have been reading my posts for that long! shocked Actually the money is WAY better than usual for tractor driving out here. Most get between $13-$20/hr that works out to .35c/acre. This is what I used to get so you can see why I mentioned it. If I got $1.10/acre for a whole cropping season(Oct-Jun) it would be worth about $30000. Would be hard to knock that back to be honest.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/09/2006 22:05

Change of beat !

Thursday saw 58,300 plus sheep sold at the Wagga Wagga Livestock selling centre as farmers in South West NSW fast running out of feed realize a cashing out of livestock.
This is the highest number of stock sold in a single day since Sep 26 2002 when 55,600 sheep were auctioned here.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/09/2006 07:52

A sad day indeed. frown These are type of records that rural Australia doesn't need broken.
Posted by: Weathernut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/09/2006 18:17

Here's the artical.
http://www.riverinamediagroup.com.au/Hom...ticletype=Local
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/09/2006 19:19

The drought is hitting home now.
I hope it rains really soon,for all those who need it for their crops & animals :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/09/2006 23:23

Hi all u straw chewers - hows life ? sad to see u r talking about dry times again over there in the east. In Gods own country here on the south coast i'm embarrised to say again its probably the best Spring we have ever had. Feeds that strong with the low winter rainfall and warm winter its like we had spring all winter!!! wet winters fill dams, but tend to slow feed growth, this year there was little run off to dams, but the feed has grown all year!
75% of last years hay still in the stack, but will soon be transported north to people only 30 kms away who are already short of feed and will be short of water.
i've been missing off WZ (except for getting my footy tips in ewach week)becos our life has been in turmoil for the last 10 months as we have been in the death throws of fighting a losing battle with Govt over compensation for taking a big slice of the farm for a new road system, arguements with Ministers, bureaucrats, planners, valuers ect - our only saving grace is that land prices have skyrocketed while the arguing is going on and valuers will only give 90 day valuations and Govt is incapable of getting paper work together in 90 days - its like a merry go round, but every day we still have deer park open, Growers market and farm work - quite frankly i'm exhausted, but expect some finalisation in November.....who knows, i thought that last year!
thankfully Mrs FE & i r both in good health, our little one & only grandson is due to be over here with Mum & Dad for Christmas - he'll be 10 mths old, it will be my first meeting, Grandma spent a month in Canberra with him in July. so i've got a fishing rod ready, hope he can walk by then to cast it laugh fishing taken back stage over last few months, but i hope to be ready for summer fishing.
well thats my up date - my condolences to those of u facing dry times again - unfortunately from what friends who have come back from overseas tell me it looks like cliomate change is causing trouble all over the world. my nephew went to europe, was in a little village in the Alps somewhere & was surprised to see netting barriers all thru the town & upon asking was told it was to stop rocks hitting houses, apparently a glacier had melted higher up the valley and for the first time the ice in the granite rock had melted and the granite was falling to bits, previously held together by the ice!! seems we r all going to suffer somehow, yet we keep expanding populations, increased living standards need more power = more pollution - i think its gone too far to correct & i cant see big energy using nations really doing anything substancial to turn it around..all just too greedy i guess when it takes so much resources to sustain $million salaries to those with snouts in the trough...
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/09/2006 00:05

Hi FE :wave: good to see you back again, you've been missed. Fingers crossed all this government stuff will be over and done with before the year is out. Glad to read that someone is able to grow some feed. For the first time since I moved here all the crops in the valley are below a foot in height. eek Luckily for us though the valley is still as drought proof as ever and the natural grasses are still holding on to provide enough feed for the 9 horses we have on the place for the time being. If we can score an inch of rain before summer, we should be able to make it through the hottest part of the year with very little hay supplement. Fingers crossed.

Our biggest problem at the moment with the lack of rain is that we're fast running out of water for the house. In another first, the tanks never got full enough to overflow this year. Looks like we'll actually have to cart water in unless a small miracle happens. Fortunately our neighbour has a property on which town water is connected, so if we get to that desperate point, we can fill up a tank and just pay her excess water rates for what we use, rather than outsource and pay through the nose for someone to bring it in.

Surprisingly the aquifer is flowing quite freely and has even risen over the last few months, unfortunately it's a tad too hard to put through the house system without a filtration system of sorts. Reverse osmosis is what we've been looking at, but a high iron content in the water could see a system costing up to $8000 to put in. Way too much for our meagre budget. frown

Okay, enough grumping from me. We're all real well here (well, I have the flu, but the rest of my health is good) and my son at 25 years old is finally moving out to be independant, giving me an extra room and cutting our food bill in half, not to mention saving us on water. Loves his long showers, that boy. He'll be right in Clare, they're on town water there, LOL. I've also been blessed with seeing my eldest daughter more often with her living only just down the road after coming back from NSW after the split with her ex-boyfriend.

Anyway, glad to read that you and Mrs. FE are both well and that you'll have your grandson home for Christmas. What a thrill that will be and I bet Grandad will just spoil him rotten. laugh

Hope to see you again here soon.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: ----

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/09/2006 08:25

Quote:
Originally posted by Fine Elsewhere:
it takes so much resources to sustain $million salaries to those with snouts in the trough...
:wave: FE
Ah Mr FE, that little line above is a pure gold 1 liner quote of what runs our world.
I hear ya passion mate as do most of the real world people. But governemnts pander to corporate mindsets not people so I see no real change until like you say its all too late. I deal with these snout in the trough people all day and their conviction that our technology will save us all and keep the economy of growth sustained is oh so very strong. Too strong I am afraid. Their view of the small person is as a resource to be drained and at times their treatment of me and others in the store is second rate. If only they knew how stupid they look at times.. lol..

Well mate I must go to work I suppose, take care over there and fight hard!
Cheers,
Tim smile
Posted by: Lindsay Knowles

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/09/2006 19:06

Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/09/2006 19:43

Silly weather today it seems for NSW....nothing more than a few spots here despite the green mass moving through on radar mid morning with strong winds beginning at 5am.
Sydney has 34 degrees with bushfires raging & snow falling in the High Country.
Atm the Southern Cross is twinkling brightly over a very light breeze.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/10/2006 22:49

Point of no return has been reached here now with Canola crops too far gone so many are turning stock in or making hay from these crops. Another week & the same will happen with cereals as they are folding up very quickly. We may see these crops "freeze dried" by applying Roundup to kill the crop thus preserving nutrients for whichever way farmers go ...Make hay or go with a stock enterprise
Recent conversations with farmers have seen a common statement made "It's enough to make you cry ! ".
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/10/2006 23:09

Yeah goody I am going off to windrow frosted wheat tomorrow. frown By the sounds of it is would have gone the tonne/acre but over 80% frosted so they are going to bale. At leaset they have enough to bale. ATM we don't have enough to stop wind erosion. frown Worse than 2002 now IMO. No way will we put stock on as they powder the soil even more. Just leave it till next year and re-sow.

Had another interview today went well hope I get it. With a cropping research group so still farming just getting paid to do it! wink
Posted by: Twisters

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/10/2006 23:46

Yeah when drove up to Mildura from MElb never seen so many Bare or just green paddocks for late septmber normaly full of wheat not this year

Also noticed many paddocks with a wheat crop that had sheep eating there foot high crop never seen that before shows how bad things are and when drove home with the gusty winds there was blowing dust and think wednesday will be even worst frown
Posted by: Twisters

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/10/2006 23:46

Yeah when drove up to Mildura from MElb never seen so many Bare or just green paddocks for late septmber normaly full of wheat not this year

Also noticed many paddocks with a wheat crop that had sheep eating there foot high crop never seen that before shows how bad things are and when drove home with the gusty winds there was blowing dust and think wednesday will be even worst frown
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/10/2006 20:33

On the 15th of last month I posted a report of a record number of sheep 58,300 being sold at Waggg Wagga
That was broken again today with 64,000 out of a booking in of 75,000....I was going just to see this event happen & photograph it, but decided at the last minute it was something I did not want to do.
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/10/2006 16:31

From all I am hearing from farmers, and what I've seen, this could be the worst drought since 1900 in most areas by the end of the year...if it isn't already!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/10/2006 23:08

Yeah it is bad but at least farming practices are mostly better and the dust would not be as bad. These frosts are killing anybody's crops who actually survived so getting pretty bad. Just hope that this is the last bad year for a while now as everybody needs to get back in the black. Holts I have heard things about your forecasts for next year. I will not give your secrets away(I have not actually read a forecast, just heard about what you are saying), but this will really prove one way or the other if you are worth paying for! Good or bad if you are right(and we are still here!) you may well have another client. wink
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/10/2006 10:37

G'day Adon. Yer, the forecasts are copyright, but by human nature they seem to go around quite a bit through "pub talk" and "farmer meet on the road by the fence-post chin-wags", " bush telegraph", etc. (I get to hear other long-range forecasters forecasts the same way. I listen to them out of interest, but do not worry what they say, as I go my own way that I have confidence in, and by the computer models that I have put so much effort into). Hope to have you onboard sometime in the future.
Yer, farming practices have improved a lot, and crop varieties also, and most farmers can cope much better in a dry/drought year, but it is still hard to be able to beat a real drought, with well below average rainfall, frosts and heat waves in Spring!
Not many will this year by the look. I don't know where all the crop is coming from on their crop estimates for 2006!
Cheers, Ian (Holts)
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/10/2006 14:54

Fairyland Holt's, that where the crop is coming from! There are even frosted crops in the western district(Vic) this year. I dunno if they have found out about that yet. Well we won't even start the header this year and many others are in the same boat.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/10/2006 16:52

Hi All. Well, got to see the first lot of hay that's being cut and baled around here. What a joke. Most farmers in the district have given up on trying to head their crops and have gone down the "hay" route, if you can call it that! Plenty of green stalks, but no grain in the heads, such a sorry state of affairs in what has been known in the past as a drought-proof valley. No so this year, the rain has avoided a good proportion of people in the Mid North who not only have to suffer the indignation of no or very little feed, but also the lack of water that has kept rainwater tanks very lean. Most farmers in this area have no access to mains water.

Normally by this time of the year we should have had 324mm of rain, but we've received less than half of that and have carted in our first 600 gallons of town water for washing and bathing. Yuck!!! We have however saved 1000 gallons of rainwater for drinking purposes only, so at least we don't have to ingest the stuff. Let's hope the rains start to fall and soon, but that unfortunately is in the lap of the gods.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/10/2006 13:03

You made me go out and tap my tank....we're okay wink
Just had a drive up thru Kerang/Koondrook/Deni/Hay and on into the dry country of central NSW and not a successful dryland crop anywhere along the way.
I'll just leave a slab of pics here for anyones amusement
Yellow Blanket
Nice campsite
Daisies
Daisies2
Scrubs dry but holding
Lunch for some
Dry old country but!
We certainly leave a mark
Can\'t help liking it though
Then you finally settle on a nice isolat...to screw it up laugh
'tis a beautiful country...just a bastard of a place to farm. Irrigated crops were the only thing I saw standing....and I was quite surprised as I didn't think many water allocations were allowed this year confused
...not that any crops were hanging over the fences but they were a far cry from the dryland crops that I watched the hot wind giving curry too....bad state of affairs out there frown
while the bushland areas do seem to be holding up pretty well.
.......shame emus don't bring a good quid.

Sorry about the pics but I was running a kodacrap special smile
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 11/10/2006 15:59

Lovely pics Mike and certainly nothing wrong with them. smile Reckon you could get a good feed off of those emus... only in Australia, hey? laugh

Good to see some of the bush with a bit of green grass, but shame about the dryland crops. I'm confused too about irrigated crops, I thought they'd all but pulled the plug on water allocations this year.

Hopefully next year will see a turn around, but I can sure see why folk are leaving the land and heading in to town. frown

Thanks for sharing some pics and info on what others don't get to see too often.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 08:33

It appears the lull in this El Nino as mentioned by holts seems to on the S.O.I. of late to be coming to an end with figures once again heading downhill & fast.
I agree with you guys Adon & holts that estimates on the 06 crop for this year are fanciful to say the least.
The way it is going around this part of N.S.W. now it could mean nothing is harvested at all !...The forecast of high temperatures could well spell the end sooner than later.
Hi Dilbert & Helen

I think you need a "much much" bigger tank Helen

Happy trails
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 11:37

Quote:
Originally posted by Goody:
I think you need a "much much" bigger tank Helen

Happy trails
Hi there Goody. :wave:

Yep, a much, much bigger tank wouldn't go astray, but then you gotta get rainfall to fill it. :p With less than half our average rainfall to date, even the tanks we have never got close to filling. frown

I reckon this has to be the driest its been in my lifetime and even the long-time farmers around here reckon the valley has never ever been this dry... of course they're the same one's that cry drought when we haven't had rain by May, so are a little prone to exageration. :rolleyes: Still, at least for this year, they did call it right. wink
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 18:31

Kodacrap Special indeed Dilbert. :p
Gotta love that red dirt don't you laugh laugh

Great company .Great pics :cheers:
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 19:45

Great pics Dilbert...I just love the Aussie bush wet or dry...but its better wet, of course!

Some of the irrigators have water left from last years allocation and they can still use some of it until about February I think, then the irrigation channels will be closed. And some have bore licences and can pump from the underground aquifer. That is why they are still irrigating some paddocks, etc. Tha's what they tell me anyway.
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 19:56

Hey Adon cloud is forming up NW of SA and GASP still has NW cloud-band over most of SA and VIC sat slowly drifting northwards with say 5 to 20mm over most of us north of say 50km south of Adelaide to about Ararat to Melbourne, and the band up to Riverina NSW. Even if we cut the rain in half, like we used to do at the Bureau ...then it is still say 3 to 10mm...better than nothing...here's hoping anyway!
The GASP has had a rainfall NW Cloud-band on it for days actually. It would be nice to smell rain and hear it on the roof, almost forgotten what it is like! Don't know if it would actually help many though...maybe a few in the North Mallee SA and Lower North SA & Hills SA, and maybe a few in VIC & NSW also, I guess.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2006 22:20

Oh yeah Good stuff crops are dead now so not gunna do that any good but might settle some dust I suppose!

On a different note, just came back from Melb tonight and saw HEAPs of grass hoppers around Bendigo. Must have hatched in the last couple of days Maybe even today. Real thick little bands of hoppers across the roads evey now and then.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/10/2006 01:21

Hi All, Hey dilbert i loved the pics - the one about the Campsite had some pines in the background, are those native pines or imported radiata or pinasta ? we don't have any native pines on the western side of the continent as far as i'm aware, but i understand u have a few over there.
Hate to say it, but we had a lovely showery day today to boost our hay crop, nearly lost it last week with a 28 degreee day jumped up unexpectedly. Grain from WA will be well down this year due to lack of rain, last forcast i heard was 60 % of avarage, but i'm not sure. i'm off to a big family do this weekend, so i will catch up with those from further up country who can tell me first hand whats happening.
i recon u should get a bit of moisture over there in the next few days, but if its like over here, the systems look promiosing, but moisture doesn't convert to rainfall!?!
good luck to u all,
:wave: FE
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/10/2006 09:51

Yer Holts you are right about the GASP runs having that rain on them for a while. I mentioned it about 5 days ago. While the rain amounts have come back it has stuck with it. Time will tell if it comes off. Never know GASP moy be the one we go to for a while!
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/10/2006 10:27

These are from similiar country Here & here in '05...someone else will have to help you with variety of pine/cedars but they are prevalent across the dunes from Nyngan west to the Darling....with stands of eucy on the lower areas and pines on the high.(not that the area isn't as flat a shitcarters hat other than nasty rocky ridges and endless dunes toward the river)
Timber mills sorted most of the big stuff early last century and after talking to a learned gentleman in Cobar who's grandfather had a saw mill near the Darling he suggested that all the timber trim, lining boards and ornate ceilings of blackwood in my place in Vic came from this Darling river area 110 years ago.
Must have been heaps of timber cut out of these areas...lots went into wood fired boilers for mining and agriculture I'd say......but the regrowth has created a very nice forest that you can move through easily.
Lovely district and those that live there are addicted to it ....but with the beauty of the area I can appreciate why......just tooo bloody hot for me laugh
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/10/2006 12:10

Crops here have failed miserably around the district here but fortunately for us we did have a nice downpour of 50mm(31/08) & 12.5mm(01/09), that seemed to save our paddock of triticale enough to feed it off anyway. Sadly that downpour was only over us & a couple of the neighbours but not a drop out at the 3,000 acre block.
Down to our last 100 bales of hay & haven't had any water in our dams since November last year (besides the few inches from the 50mm end of August at the house block) so now looking at a major destocking in the next 2 weeks.
It doesn't matter which direction you look out here, all looks the same. So much of this beautiful country suffering, no matter which state you live in.
Rainfall YTD - 182.5mm (Avg = 600mm) lagging behind a bit.

Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/10/2006 20:03

Damn it's dry up there Jules, not unlike our neighbourhood. frown

The whole country's getting rather thirsty... only saving grace for us so far is that the aquifer is still holding out okay. smile
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/10/2006 23:39

I've heard that the crops down in the Riverina are starting to fail spectacularly, with most farmers either letting stock in to feed on the canola or cutting it early for feed. frown

Seems no matter where you go in the SE (incl SA wink ) things are looking rather dire!

:cheers: Will
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2006 00:06

Yeah happening everywhere Willy. Very few spots have escaped this one and even some irrigation crops have been frosted and will be well down on yield. We have been cutting crops that looked very nice indeed(even on dryland)but the frost has knocked out 90% of the yield. They are baling it for stockfeed and are getting good money for it so at least they will get somthing. We on the other hand(unless we get a good 10mm+ this week) will not start a header and the crops are so bad they are not good enough to cut for hay. We were too cautious at the start of the season and delayed planting in hope of a better break later on. We didn't have another chance for 4-5weeks and that made a huge diff. A crop across the road from our house(not our land) has a crop that will get seed and a little better and also would have been good enough to cut hay to recover all costs and make a little money. Well win some loose heaps more I suppose but still looking for work away from the farm and looking for mining work in Qld now if I get some I will not be coming back frown
Posted by: Jules J

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2006 08:41

Helen, glad to hear your bore is holding up ok, all ours are now kapoot. This drought is so widespread, if a map of Australia were a dartboard it'd be hard to hit a spot that wasn't in drought frown

Adon, most of the young ones in the district here have left to work in the mines. It's been a major re-adjustment for many of them due to their work ethics, lots have found the bureaucratic bulldust the hardest to cope with. Good luck with your search for work.
Posted by: Alexia

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2006 06:16

Can anyone tell me if there are any problems feeding canola hay to cattle. We are going to buy some but haven't had any experence with it. Would appreciete any information about same.We are having trouble getting hay without huge transport cost.
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2006 07:04

Hi Alexia,
Had a bit of a look around about canola hay and all seem to come up with the following : "Canola is not designed for animal consumption as hay; there are also serious herbicide and pesticide concerns. Canola hay is potentially toxic and is not recommended under any circumstances", so I guess it would not be a good idea.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2006 10:26

Hi Alexia & Farmer
I am only going to confuse you both here because it is my understanding that canola hay is every bit as good as lucerne. I have not had any personal experience with it but Locals here have turned sheep into failed canola crop while others are making it everywhere of late into Silage bales (sealed in plastic) to Large Square & Round Rolls. I think if you decide to go with it surely you could buy some not to far away there Alexia & cut that freight cost down.
If you are in a drought declared area you will be entitled to recieve a freight subsidy to get hay of any sort in. Talk to your local PP Board
Happy trails !
Posted by: Alexia

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2006 13:46

Thanks Farmer & Goody. We are in victoria no freight subsidy for us.We are drought declared.
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/10/2006 08:20

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Farmer:
"Canola is not designed for animal consumption as hay; there are also serious herbicide and pesticide concerns. Canola hay is potentially toxic and is not recommended under any circumstances",

Remind me not to but canola oil after that quote! eek
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/10/2006 17:51

Well I don't know a lot about canola for hay but one hell of a lot is being cut for hay. We have been doing a fait bit of windrowing in both cereal and canola. generally the canola that is being cut for hay has not had as much pesticide applied because of frost damage and low yield potential so if the only concern would be the feed content and I have heard as long as the plant has a few flowers sil on it when cut it is not too bad. I wouldn't use it as a first option but when desperation calls....
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/10/2006 09:45

"I Love a Sunburnt Country"
(The correct forever Long-Range Weather Forecast for Australia: written 1906)

The love of field and coppice,
Of green and shaded Lanes,
Of ordered woods and gardens,
Is running in your veins;
Strong love of grey-blue distance,
Brown streams and soft, dim skies -
I know but cannot share it,
My love is otherwise.

I love a SUNBURNT country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of DROUGHT and FLOODING RAINS,
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel sea,
Her beauty and her terror -
The WIDE BROWN land for me.

The tragic ring-barked forests
Stark white beneath the moon,
The sapphire-misted mountains,
The hot gold hush of noon.
Green tangle of the brushes
Where lithe lianas coil,
An orchids deck the tree-tops
And ferns the crimson soil.

Core of my heart, my country!
Her PITILESS BLUE SKY,
When SICK AT HEART AROUND US,
We see the CATTLE DIE -
But then the GREY CLOUDS GATHER
AND WE CAN BLESS AGAIN,
THE DRUMMING OF AN ARMY,
THE STEADY SOAKING RAIN.

Core of my heart, my country!
Land of the Rainbow Gold,
For FLOOD and FIRE and FAMINE,
She PAYS US BACK THREEFOLD;
Over the THIRSTY PADDOCKS,
WATCH, after MANY DAYS
The filmy veil of GREENNESS,
That THICKENS AS WE GAZE.

An opal-hearted country,
A wilful, lavish land -
All you who have not loved her,
You will not understand -
Though Earth holds many splendours,
Wherever I may die,
I know to what BROWN COUNTRY
My homing thoughts will fly."

(Dorothy Mc Keller 1908, written 1906)
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/10/2006 11:58

Thankyou so much for that Ian, I so love that piece.

Even though written in 1906, it could have very well been written today... and it celebrates its centenary, too. smile

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 10:11

This one is pretty apt, too:

SAID HANRAHAN by John O'Brien

"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
In accents most forlorn,
Outside the church, ere Mass began,
One frosty Sunday morn.

The congregation stood about,
Coat-collars to the ears,
And talked of stock, and crops, and drought,
As it had done for years.

"It's looking crook," said Daniel Croke;
"Bedad, it's cruke, me lad,
For never since the banks went broke
Has seasons been so bad."

"It's dry, all right," said young O'Neil,
With which astute remark
He squatted down upon his heel
And chewed a piece of bark.

And so around the chorus ran
"It's keepin' dry, no doubt."
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

"The crops are done; ye'll have your work
To save one bag of grain;
From here way out to Back-o'-Bourke
They're singin' out for rain.

"They're singin' out for rain," he said,
"And all the tanks are dry."
The congregation scratched its head,
And gazed around the sky.

"There won't be grass, in any case,
Enough to feed an ass;
There's not a blade on Casey's place
As I came down to Mass."

"If rain don't come this month," said Dan,
And cleared his throat to speak -
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"If rain don't come this week."

A heavy silence seemed to steal
On all at this remark;
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed a piece of bark.

"We want an inch of rain, we do,"
O'Neil observed at last;
But Croke "maintained" we wanted two
To put the danger past.

"If we don't get three inches, man,
Or four to break this drought,
We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

In God's good time down came the rain;
And all the afternoon
On iron roof and window-pane
It drummed a homely tune.

And through the night it pattered still,
And lightsome, gladsome elves
On dripping spout and window-sill
Kept talking to themselves.

It pelted, pelted all day long,
A-singing at its work,
Till every heart took up the song
Way out to Back-o'-Bourke.

And every creek a banker ran,
And dams filled overtop;
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"If this rain doesn't stop."

And stop it did, in God's good time;
And spring came in to fold
A mantle o'er the hills sublime
Of green and pink and gold.

And days went by on dancing feet,
With harvest-hopes immense,
And laughing eyes beheld the wheat
Nid-nodding o'er the fence.

And, oh, the smiles on every face,
As happy lad and lass
Through grass knee-deep on Casey's place
Went riding down to Mass.

While round the church in clothes genteel
Discoursed the men of mark,
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed his piece of bark.

"There'll be bush-fires for sure, me man,
There will, without a doubt;
We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

Around the Boree Log and Other Verses, 1921
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 14:44

This is a piece that I am emailing to the herald sun in reply to an attack on farms from Peter Cullen. I have not let on that I am a farmer so we will see if it gets in!

Once again Peter Cullen has popped up to splurge out his garbage to the masses. Mr Cullen wants some of the worlds most efficient and least subsidised farmers to leave the land instead of being helped through a tight patch. Yes this has been the worst drought in a century and will certainly take a long time to recover from. This will mean that a huge amount of money will need to be diverted to rural Australia to help us through. But this is not climate change as Mr Cullen has suggested. This is simply a bad drought, no more. He does however, have good points on water use and I think that everybody should be recycling wastewater and catching storm water for later use.
Most Cities in South Eastern Australia should be restricted from growing further and instead populations should be directed to where the water is. Bendigo and Ballarat are already over stretching their resources yet the building continues. Why are these cities allowed to grow when they have to poach water from other parts of the state to survive? Would it not make more sense to develop towns along the Murray River or parts of Northern Australia where water is more available?

If this drought was proof that climate change will turn more of Australia into desert what would explain the federation drought or the countless droughts before that? Surely global warming was not around then to wreak havoc on the country? Peter and his activist cohorts are using the current drought to push their agenda and trying to fool the people in cities that our land will never be the same. Our water storages are low but that is to be expected as this drought has lasted for longer than they have for a century but this has happened before. Media showing images of dry rivers are being touted as proof that global warming is here, these rivers have run dry many times before they were dammed and is misleading to suggest they have never been that way before. Have a look at history when paddle steamers used the Murray Darling as a transport system; reports of steamers being stuck in shallow pools for months waiting for the rivers to rise again are common. Was global warming at fault then?

Australia has some of the most efficient farmers in the world. They are not supported anything like most other farmers in developed countries across the world are, so they have to be. To suggest that farmers are bad managers is not only wrong but it is an insult to the people who feed you. Farmers do not enjoy getting the assistance they are applying for. They have waited until they cannot hold on for any longer before applying.

The prices for our products have hardly changed since the 1970’s while our costs have gone up with everything else. That is why farmers need assistance in this drought. How would Mr Cullen or most other people for that matter, deal with living with today’s prices while being paid 1970’s wages? In times past, one tonne of wheat was equal to a week’s average wage. Now it takes four tonnes to get an average week’s wages. Farmers could recover from a drought fairly quickly because they were being paid a decent amount for the things they produced. Your average loaf of bread has about 8c worth of wheat in it. If the farmer were getting 16c for that wheat, they would not need help. Somebody is making big money, but it’s not farmers. Now even bigger farmers are struggling to recover because their profit margins are so small, it will take them many good years to bounce back. If the current, high prices for grain, fruit ect. were the normal prices, they would not need help in the first place.

Having only large farms is not the answer, as this means most of the farms will be corporate giants only focused on profit and the land would suffer. Small farmers in general are emotionally attached to their land and take good care of the land they love. Loosing these small farmers would no doubt lead to more land degradation and increased weeds and pests. Supporting farmers who take care of the land should be more important than the bottom line.


Why isn’t Mr Cullen attacking the automotive industry being supported because they are not viable? Every time Holden, Ford or Mitsubishi hint that they will stop production they are quickly handed out huge sums of money so they will continue to provide jobs for the cities. Farms support a huge amount of people not only in rural Australia but cities too; providing high quality food and fibre for us all. These carmakers produce the very things that pump massive amounts of the greenhouse gasses that he says are changing our climate. Or maybe the “artists” who are paid large sums of money to produce “art” that resemble junkyards or graffiti. This is not sustainable; it’s a joke… a costly joke. Or maybe the film industry, which is constantly crying out for more government money to produce entertainment, nobody else will fund. These are industries are unsustainable without constant government support and yet nothing is said about them.

Mr Cullen, I would say to you, go and whinge about government supporting other truly unsustainable industries and stop using this drought as a stepping-stone to push your theory on global warming. While you at it, get your salary cut back to 1970’s levels and see how you go! Farmers need to be paid a decent amount for the things they produce and we will be happy. Concentrate on pushing for change to the unceasing development of water poor areas and call for spreading development over a wider area. Will you be still out there spitting on farmers after this drought breaks, or will you wait until the next drought to reply?
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 17:32

I hope this is published, but knowing the Herald there mightn't be much chance.

There is too much farmer-bashing from certain quarters in Australia.
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 19:40

Well said Adon, and good poem Keith...I shall put it up with the Sunburnt Country on the pin-up board.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 20:21

Thanks for that poem Keith, it's also a beauty. laugh

Adon, that's a fine piece of literature and worthy to be printed in the paper, I sure hope they do. laugh Small typo in paragraph 5 though; should be losing, not loosing. wink

Had to have a teeny giggle with your comment on the film industry which spend copious amounts of money on films and series, which seem to do really well in Australia. My daughter's currently doing a stint with McLeod's Daughters and being fed very well... I told her to bring home a doggie bag. laugh
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 20:44

Good for you adon.
I thought that read very well,I hope it does get published.
I hope people sit up & take notice or very soon there will be no farms left. :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 22:09

Thank guys! Well I have emailed it(with the typo shocked )to them so it is in their hands now. Prolly won't make it but hel it might wake the person up who reads it! There is much more that could be said but no use making it 20 pages long!
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 22:24

I'll have my fingers crossed Adon, them darn city-slickers sure need to wake up and smell the roses. Getting baloney fed to them by do-gooders makes them think there's nothing beyond the city walls.

Now if we could only get the government to recognise the little farms. We're classed as a hobby farm and with hubby working away from home we don't get any relief. Not that we want much, but a few dollars to bring mains water up to the house from the town pipeline would be most beneficial. smile
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 24/10/2006 22:49

It's amazing how these people think that small farmers are bad managers. Dad is not really in debt actually. He has maxed out his overdraught but has no other loans to pay off. We are very small for our area and yet most if not all others are WAY in debt. Dad is pretty old and does not want to borrow much more to keep going as he is ill and will most likley have to sell or lease soon for health reasons. Drought funding is hard for him to get as they think he is on the borderline of being viable yet his postions in relation to others is much better. We take care of our land and do not let dust blow around, weeds are kept under control as are pests. Others in the area who are considered good farmers have wind stripping bare soil away because they flog the country to death. I would consider dad a better farmer as his land in getting better all the time. I wish the bean counter took that into account.
Posted by: Adam Ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/10/2006 08:39

Well said adon. What peeves me off is that the city slickers always seem to be the experts on this subject. Really it does show there lack of knowledge. In the end 500 million dollars isn't alot of money for the government to give to farmers, I mean they gave 1 billion to Indonesia and the city slickers had no problem with that. But when it comes to Aussie farmers who are having to go through a natural disaster (and to me thats what a drought should be classified as) they say screw them. Now if one of our capital cities runs out of water in the next few years I bet you the city slickers will have no problem spending billions of dollars trying to give themselves drought relief so they can fill there pools up and water there garden.

In the meantime, there is still some cotton being grown out on the Darling Downs, irrigated ofcourse, theres no dryland that I know of this year. Theres a hell of alot of sorghum thats going to be planted this year with the current high prices.
Posted by: silvercloud

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/10/2006 12:49

The city slickers have no idea of anything outside of suburbia. Perth is already considering tapping into the Yarragadee aquifer which is under most of the south west of WA which is going to have a big effect on everything down the track. Where it is already tapped into by larger towns near the coast it is already becoming saline. If they take the proposed 45 gigalitres, and I reckon it'll be a lot more than that when they've been doing this for a while, it will have a major impact on rivers and our beautiful karri, marri and jarrah forests not to mention all the orchard and agricultural areas. The only restrictions Perth is on is only using the sprinklers twice a week, there's no limit on using a hose or filling swimming pools and the water corporation said that there won't be any harsher restrictions. mad I am so sick of the city taking everything for themselves with no regard to anyone else. The pipeline they will be using is going to be put through a lot of farmers properties including ours. They want a 20m easement and we can't plant any trees on it. At our place they will have to pull out around a hundred trees to put in this pipe and we can't replace them. mad
Posted by: Keith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/10/2006 13:07

Well, the farmers have another critic.

Dr Suzuki is having a good go at them on...you guessed it..ABC TV.
Posted by: windjammer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/10/2006 14:22

Eventually they will realise that it's not just fuel prices making fresh Aussie produce expensive or unavailable in the supermarket.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/10/2006 22:05

Well windjammer the produce may be expensive now but up until the last two months, the price for grain was still fairly low. I was saying before if we had the current prices for grain(about double the normal price) we would not be needing drought assistance as we would have recovered from the last drought. Even at the current prices, the wheat that goes into a loaf of bread would only be worth 8c. The rest is made by the flour mills and other middle men along the way. If you have some spare time one day, do a search for grain, oilseed and potato prices. Compare them to what you end up paying at the supermarket, you will get a shock.

Oh and Keith for a environmentalist, Dr Suzuki seems to travel a lot. Wonder how he got over here??? Airliners are some of the biggest, most effective polluters on earth. They put the bad stuff directly up there so unless he sailed over, or caught a ride on a sea bird he get get stuffed.
Posted by: windjammer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/10/2006 14:13

Yeah, a friend of mines Dad farms near Dubbo. He topped the market the other week with his beasts. Forget what he got p/kg, but it was under $4 (hung weight) Someone's still making a lot of money, and it ain't the farmer, or the butcher.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/10/2006 11:00

If it does'nt rain out of this I'll be a Monkeys Uncle
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/10/2006 18:28

The skies keep promising rain out this way, but just don't deliver. frown

Interestingly, despite the dry, more and more folk out here are taking up flood insurance for the very first time... and my cacti are starting to flower... something that doesn't usually happen until after the rain. confused

Looking at NE NSW and SE Qld today, things look a little more promising with storms galore gracing the area... hopefully this means that something is finally going to break for the country... and not the bank balance, either. wink
Posted by: ----

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/10/2006 22:18

Hi folks, thought you may like to hear from the only real truly drought-proof country in SA. Even a bad year is still productive here and this year was no real different. More in a minute on that...

October was the driest yet recorded for us though with just 4mm for the month beating all previous recordings. It is amazing just how dry the ground is for this time of year. But you all know the reality of this!!

Back to productivity. The nature of the Southern ranges with much cooler temps and the ability to catch most moisture that will be around has given us anything but a disaster. Hay cuts were about 50% down on hillsface pastures but the gullies and flats (the huge Kuitpo valley for example) were pretty close to 80%. Even now the rich flats are still waist deep in grass with hay cut paddocks regreening as the grass goes to head. This is our worse season ever yet still we are highly productive.

Which leads me to my gripe (what dribble would be complete without a gripe?) The governments go on about water shortages and the rising cost of living due to production shortfalls associated with the drought. This makes sense of sorts. Supply and demand and all that. In the very next breath they say that the economy needs to grow our population needs to increase and proceed to pop up intensive housing developments in the middle of SA's only productive country in ANY year. Er, maybe I am simple, but at last check you cannot grow produce on concrete and tiles? AAARGGGHHH this blatant hypocrisy really $hits me not to mention the veiled insult that we are all fools and cannot see what is going on.
I know there are bigger issues but this one is my pet hate and it frustrates me to the very core to see my much loved hills subdivided and the living standard of all concerned slowly erode not to mention the sustainability issues.

There rant over smile Thanks for the space and time smile smile
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2006 10:49

Good gripe hillsrain !

Hope this coming rain event fires up that grass...not literally of course
The production there is just unbelievable so that says a lot for your fresh air with so little rain. I can see why then you are faced with such a dilema in that the farmers would not want to be selling out.
I don't know what you are going to do about the overriding problem (as I see it) of you being so close to Adelaide & the life style sprawl ?
We have signs along the roadsides here saying Area of High Conservation meaning roadside vegetation....Perhaps you should start a similar campaign for your farmland ?
As climate change bites & our farmers begin to disapear State Gov's might out of necessity put an end to this in areas of such high productivity ?.
Here in NSW now in zoned 1A Rural Farmland one cannot sub divide under 100ha which goes some way to protecting farmlands.
I am in a similar situation to you in that urban lifestyle from Wagga Wagga reaches further every year.
With our fresh air containing no moisture at all & with the way things are going some farmers here in these areas will see this as a Godsend to at least have willing & paying buyers to get out.
This will continue no doubt to be a very vexing problem
Happy trails !
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2006 22:10

I can feel that Monkey suit coming on....I don't like this one little bit going on the radar atm
Posted by: ----

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/11/2006 23:36

Hey Goody, a vexing problem indeed and I really cannot see an answer either. I guess the money talks louder than sense and for that reason alone history will continue to write the same old stories across the planet.
We can only hope that the sense is seen and written to legislation in protecting those rare location jewels that have the capacity to feed us all very capably and without environmental stress. It should also be made law that the corporate interests must be kept out!! Adon writes well why on previous pages.
To todays weather, well not enough moisture to settle the dust on the road for me. These events far better serve the northern ranges and southern Fleurieu. Usually get caught up in the clockwork regular moisture streams ( see here ) that see's me in the dry middle. Can be frustrating at times.
Cheers,
Tim smile
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2006 09:25

We don't seem to have a breaking weather portal going atm for this southern NSW rain event which is probably just as well as nothing has happened yet & does not look like it is going to.
Right now the dust is flying Galahs are wheeling & screeching but I think in vain as the clouds are high showing mammatus bottoms

Now that is sure to get a bite ! laugh
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2006 10:55

There was a topic, storms or something, covering quite a large timeframe. It's often the way though, there's no topic, or it's in Briefing Room and you aren't allowed to say anything about what's happening. Or it's about Sydney.

The radar doesn't look too great, but the clouds here are still looking vaguely possible. Wind's getting up and it's a warm wind. Galahs were eating my house (again) this morning.
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 08:20

We got 10.4mm rain last night.Had raised dust all day yesterday.
A lot of thunder ,lightning & wind.Won't break the drought ,but it watered the garden :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 09:19

and I thought I'd finished the mowing/slashing for the year....now it goes and bloody rains.

We got 17mm and as thirsty as the ground is, we still managed some run-off that made the dam smile
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 09:28

Ant, I've got a stuffed white cockatoo with his wings open....if I put him on the garden table all the other birds stay out of the garden....not sure if it the threat of getting stuffed or attacked.....but it works wink

Maybe a hawk or kite in the window.....maybe even a silhouette of a bird of prey.....or a pump action smile
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 09:35

Good onya Dilbert !
Glad to see someone can get something decent

Heather I just looked at the bulletins & Cobar was listed as 2.2mm so You must live beside the Church there do you ? ha

Had one heck of a dust storm here lunchtime with about 5 spots.
But last night it rained 7mm so I can throw that Monkey suit back in the cupboard laugh
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 09:40

Great to see someone getting some reasonable totals. smile 2.6mm all up for the system here, but the guys reaping what little grain is on the paddocks don't really want a deluge anyway. wink A very few in this valley will get back what they sowed to try again next year, while others are just leaving the paddocks as they are to stop any topsoil loss.

Not since June has there been any monthly rainfall over 10mm in this valley and not a single month has made it over the magic 1" mark. frown Heather, I reckon we're gonna give Lynwood a run for its money this year on the big dry. wink

Anyone else have folk in their district taking out flood insurance for the first time? They're doing it in droves here, although I feel it may be a bit premature... if I'm wrong of course, at least we're raised high enough to not have to worry about flood waters. laugh

Anyway, just about time to head to the big smoke, those Starbucks coffee beans are calling.

Cheers, Helen
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2006 16:42

Quote:
Heather I just looked at the bulletins & Cobar was listed as 2.2mm so You must live beside the Church there do you ? ha

No where near a church Goody laugh laugh

2.2 at the airport & we are 3 ks away from that,my daughter lives about 10 minitues walk from us & she had 12.3mm's. confused
Just had another nice drop about 5minutes ago,still plenty of thunder & cloud around.
Bring on the rain :cheers: :cheers:


Not to sure about the rest of you but I am buying the newspapers everyday now that I live in town & I am having a great laugh/nearly cry sometimes & shake my head at the reporting of the drought.
There has been a ongoing drought now for the last few years people on the land & in the bush know this.
All of a sudden it seems city folk & politicians are finally coming to realise what we have know for years.

We are in trouble with this drought,big trouble & no one wants to try & fix our wasted water problems.


Every morning I go for a walk & every morning there is water running down gutters & into the drains being wasted.One spot has been the same for the past 3 months & the place the water is running from is Council owned.Go figure. :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/11/2006 13:42

Canola Hay a Drought Ration

Something has come to my attention that I would like to make mention of to anyone wishing to purchase canola hay. It might be just prudent to ask for a declaration from the seller on what chemicals have been used....To also seek advice from your local Agronomist & Vet to its use as a drought ration.

A scenario may (I say may) exist as I see it that Farmer has eluded to in an earlier post.... No one really knows & any sort of trace back to any farmer would be the last thing now one would want to see happen !

Happy trails
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/11/2006 08:17

Bendigo market saw $3/head for sheep last week before this rain......'twill be amusing to see what sort of kneejerk sheep price we get this week after this nice bit of rain through the district.
Graziers will choose to sit on their hands still (and be happy to feed their breeding stock) but the w/end farmers will be having a buy up with sheep so cheap :p

Have to feel sorry for the guys with crops still standing ....they are so short that if they shoot in the head they will be able to take root :rolleyes: .....nay sorry shocked (sick humour).....the crops didn't need hammering any closer to the ground, so stunted and short already it will be hard to keep the header out of the rocks frown
Seriously...lets hope the growers get a break and these crumby crops don't shoot in this moist air and destroy the lot......hoping for a breezy sunny day here.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/11/2006 13:01

Hey Adon !

I was just watching the ABC Landline story on the Birchip Field Days....Which one was you ?
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/11/2006 13:38

I've just been for a run up into Adon country this morn....Charlton Wychiproof across thru Birchip to Hopetoun and back.
So bloody dry out in that country...just straw coloured without a break frown
Everyone was chirpy though and never walked passed a person in Charlton or Hopetoun without an "'ello!" or a "G'day"....nice change from even Bendigo.
Ended up getting a cup of tea in the OP shop even....and some bone handle knives.

Nice district and nice community you have up there Adon....shame about the dry.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/11/2006 09:28

Radar atm looks fantastic not so on the ground only 1mm here
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/11/2006 13:18

It's all going south of us now. We got a few mms earlier this morning, but now it's dodging us. although the sun out will warm things up... a storm would be nice.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/11/2006 14:05

Fingers crossed for you guys in the east. But unfortunately unfair is the name of the game with systems this time of year. Clare, 33kms to our SW has received 28.2mm, we've had 8.1mm. Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining about the rain, it's indeed welcome, I'm just complaining that a water-wasteful area gets a deluge. frown
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/11/2006 21:34

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
I've just been for a run up into Adon country this morn....Charlton Wychiproof across thru Birchip to Hopetoun and back.
So bloody dry out in that country...just straw coloured without a break frown
Everyone was chirpy though and never walked passed a person in Charlton or Hopetoun without an "'ello!" or a "G'day"....nice change from even Bendigo.
Ended up getting a cup of tea in the OP shop even....and some bone handle knives.

Nice district and nice community you have up there Adon....shame about the dry.
Yeah not very pretty up here. But still hope for a storm or two. Had 11mm today and 8mm last week. better than the whole winter! :rolleyes: but that the way it goes up here, it always rains AFTER it's to late!
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/11/2006 22:13

G'day there Adon
I spent two days this week at a Conference in Canberra on Intergrating Agriculture & Environment Imperatives for a Profitable Future. Your Ian McClelland from the Birchip Cropping Group did a good job as one of the Speakers.

It is the way of things is it not that when all the crops are dead it will rain. Distant lightning here tonight but little rain
Happy trails
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/11/2006 09:59

Much discussion about 'row in row' cultivation Goody?

I've been helping a local father and son team move toward this 'row in row' method with a mixture of GPS and a localised positioning system....they farm here and Koondrook...and the Koondrook lads are pushing them pretty hard to make these investments in equipment.
I'm just fitting sensors (following the idiot sheet) on air seeders and such at the moment for mainly basic acres meters .....but the sensors will be used when the big gear arrives and they take the big financial plunge.
Still swings on rain ....and I've got to say I'd have cold feet about this big step.
They admit themselves that they have been surviving on 'opportunity farming' for any profits they have made in the last few years ...which doesn't sit well with making this huge financial commitment to high tech cropping
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/11/2006 12:59

Hi Dilbert

Firstly, 12mm in the gauge from tail end rain to the change yesterday....Went to a farm near here this morning to have a look at what was left of a big old dead tree hit by lightning. Not much as it was all in pieces, not even a stump left in the ground.

Yes row in row that and a whole lot of High Tech stuff like you are working with which was dealt with in a Session dealing with Emerging Technologies for Intergrated Management Solutions...Sounds pretty impressive huh !
Speakers were Dr Andrew Moore, Dr Mike Robertson & Professor Alex McBratney who is Director of Aus Centre for Precision Agriculture, Sydney University.
Tram lining (driving on same tracks) for all cultivations, sprayings etc with Harvestor monitors even testing incoming grain for protein level ...Linked into to the satellite data already recorded for the fields

Amazing things can be done but as you say how can one afford all this ?
Sounds like you are at the cutting edge with it all Dilbert
Happy trails laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/11/2006 15:20

Talking about GPS guidance, I have been using a base model auto steer unit on a windrower for a few weeks. Well I wouldn't buy the bloody thing! It was not accurate enough and was really annoying by loosing satelites all the time. Another thing that really annoyed me about it was every time I engaged the auto steer the unit would "wiggle" offline then correct itself making a bulge at both ends on the land. mad .

I also helped a farmer setup his top shelf auto steer to inter row sow sorghum between canola stubble. It may have been easier if he let me do it from scratch but it took us 3 hours to finally get it right! Not exactly what you want when he was trying to dry sow the stuff and we could see the clouds coming in! I gather Dibert that the guidance you are talking about it a 2cm with base station?

They are not too bad now ($30 000) they used to be nearly $100 000 ten years ago.It is getting pretty popular with farmers around here now esecially with sprayers, but some are going the whole hog with gps on everything but the sheep! Must say it does look bloody good and does save money over time. There is fairly strong evidence to say that inter row sowing is the way to go for lower disease and better trash handling. Some crops use last years crops residues as ladders to grow on, therefor making them higher and easier to harvest. As the units get cheaper, they will be on nearly every tractor within 20 years. Antother good point is that once setup and tuned in, the operator is able to do longer hours with less fatigue. I really noticed going from a GPS machine to a fully manual one. Even though the GPS was not behaving that well I was much "fresher" at the end of the day than after a day on the manual machine.

There is another type of system i have seen which uses a camera mounted on the tractor that looks down to the crop rows. It then steers the tractor between the rows. Not GPS but needs gps to start off with so you don't have wiggly lines to work with.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/11/2006 08:20

"Sounds like you are at the cutting edge with it all Dilbert"
I race up there every time they call...I reckon this stuff in so interesting...and not much harder than wiring a trailer plug.....the boys lack a bit of confidence around technically written stuff...just haven't rubbed against it enough.
One thing about farmers/growers I find.....they are always apologising for their narrow knowledge base with their cap in therir hand .....and they are bloody wrong.
My standard line with them is that I am actually in awe of all the information they just 'know'!.....and tell them how I alway looked for our apprentice intake every year from farm boys for our city stores all over aus.
The best balance appreciative guys you will ever find for an apprenticeship....who understand work!.

I had blokes talking at me for many many years in some crumby noisey building in melb/syd
........now most issues are discussed and considered in the big blue shed which I just love so much.
I wish I'd worked all my life in the country but foolishly I thought I had more opportunities in the city...(I foolishly believed the literature)
None of this stuff is that hard Goodie you just need to be interested wink

Story time....When I got here in 1980 I became very friendly with young bloke who came to me and wanted to buy a dead stock feed mill....he wanted me to stand by his side while he bought the place for $185,000 ....I was glue...we travelled everywhere buying gear (and I taught him how to fill out the bank withdrawal and all)....we interviewed staff and found ourselves a bean counter loonie for the front desk and office and put the crews on piece work for the first year.
Then I got a govt tax guy in and he freaked when he realised Graham couldn't read smile ....and the woman from the CES office cracked up too smile
Graham payed off his mill and owns a string of equipment from hell now and tells me the Mill is turning 4 million bucks a year....and is quite profitable.
Every time I drop in to see him he likes to read me bits from the newspaper .....and always so serious it make me laugh.....I wish I had his life abilities and his focus is second to none....never ever find that steadiness in someone from the bigsoup/town.
I like hanging around farmers ....they keep me calm smile
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/11/2006 09:25

Wow ! Dilbert what a story ..... laugh

Once I started I could not stop, as I have a vivid imagination all is connected to a flash card display along the way of visions I know you speak about.

Oh dear...you know with the weather that is happening I just came here to put a post in saying : The End is Nigh

Happy trails :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/11/2006 10:50

I'll give Graham a plug....he deserves it.
Fremantles Stockfeed Mill Eddington, he does rail and road and horsey everything and well as the usual lines wink

End is nigh? .......had to put the snow chains on to get to the general store but other than that things are normal around here. confused

.....and I'm wearing mukluks laugh laugh
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/11/2006 19:09

And a very happy Christmas to all, and a from the heart...safe, blessed, prosperous and rain-filled New Year 2007 to all of you on the land, from Ian :wave: :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/11/2006 23:29

Yeah well Ian I hope your right about the rain filled bit! You should have a fair idea so hope you telling us somthing between the line! Seasons greetings right back at ya and to everybody else on the forum! :wave:

I am off working again tomorrow and not sure how long for so hope next time we chat there is somthing to chat about!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 27/11/2006 15:30

Well Dad and I are going to start the header and see what we get in a while. Reckon we will run over only about 30ac and prolly won't get much more than chook feed but sort of have to do it. Just glad we didn't sow much this year. Couldn't afford to. frown
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/11/2006 06:20

Good luck with getting under it Adon...and hope it doesn't turn into a rock collecting exercise wink .....at least the chooks will be pleased with your efforts.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/11/2006 22:02

Yeah, good luck from us too, Adon. Our neighbour had the header on his wheat crop next door today (125 acres)... he was in road-gear I reckon and had it all off in less than three hours. eek
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/11/2006 17:59

Adon I wish you well but if things don't go well ...You might like to see this account of Harvest here which is about All Over Red Rover. Creek flats yielded 2-3 bags to the acre while Granite Hills fared better with 3-4 bags to the acre. This means just enough to get seed back

I won't say happy trails with this post as I know it ain't
Ciao for now
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/11/2006 10:34

Well out of 270 acres, I managed to get......wait for it..... 25bags of barley! :rolleyes:

Had a bad night last night, my 16 month old nephew was taken by air ambulance to bendigo. He is OK now but gave us a scare
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/12/2006 19:36

Well the sheep and lamb market has really turned here in the Monaro.
2 weeks ago 40 kg lambs were making $60 to $80 at Cooma markets. Took 25 lambs to Cooma on Monday and made $8 each. eek

Agent said they could not even give away half of the sheep.

Up til mid November we had not been doing it as
tough as other areas in NSW but that has now changed, with no rain in the last 4 weeks.
frown
Posted by: windjammer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/12/2006 22:15

Why, Farmer? How can a 40kg lamb be worth $80 one week, and nothing the next? Is is advantageous speculation on the part of the buyers?
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/12/2006 22:42

That's whats called over supply of unfinnished sheep windjammer. Unfortunatly lots of farmers are selling livestock in poor condition and the market is full. The only thing that happens is the price falls becuse they do not want any more. It's funny though, one decent widesprea rain event will see the markets shoot up again as farmers try to re-stock. You can make a lot of mney if you are willing to bet on a rain and that is a very brave/stupid thing to do in these times.
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2006 07:33

Quote:
Originally posted by windjammer:
Why, Farmer? How can a 40kg lamb be worth $80 one week, and nothing the next? Is is advantageous speculation on the part of the buyers?
Hi Windjammer, I guess the fact that there were 8,000 more sheep for sale this week did not help matters much.
As Adon says, with that many sheep and lambs for sale now the major buyers can set their own price, while not many graziers can afford to gamble on rain in the near future and buy up big. frown
Posted by: mangoes

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2006 09:50

Same situation with other stock atm. Camden sales yesterday saw at least 200 horses go through.

My neighbour told me about a guy up Newcastle way that has over 400 horses in his paddocks waiting for the drought to break. Apparently he is buying up big at the sales at low prices (bought two truckloads yesterday) and is sending the poorer ones overseas for human consumption. He is keeping the good ones to resell and make a good profit on when the rain comes.
Posted by: farmer bob

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2006 15:39

It's not all bad news out there.

Did anyone read page 3 of last weeks 'The Land'? Some bloke stripping his durum wheat, and it's going to average 5 tonnes to the hectare with patches going 7t. Up in Northern NSW, on the Liverpool Plains. Deep black soil country. Wow, that is a good result, and imagine the return per hectare. He had 1200 hectares to do. Just amazing.
Posted by: windjammer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2006 22:12

I guess it's hard for a kiwi to fathom, all this drought and hardship. Where I grew up in NZ (King Country) we never had to gamble on rainfall, if it doesn't rain for 2 weeks, they call it a dry spell! Good grazing was always a given, and, from memory, (I was a kid at the time, and maybe blissfully unaware) things in my neck of the woods only went bottom up when wool prices crashed, and the days of the golden fleece were all but over. But the land, and nature, never failed us.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/12/2006 23:05

Anthoner thing happening here is the rabbits are just exploding around here. I am putting it down to the lack of mozzies due to the lack of moisture. I shot 6 the other night and they just sat there! The only reason I didn't get more was I ran out of bloody bullets! We had heaps of kiiten rabbits in the spring when we usually have mozzies and myxo going to town. We will have manier night out with the spotlights this summer!
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2006 07:18

Same thing here Adon with the rabbits. The local RLPB have done some collecting and sampling of wild rabbits around here and found that most are now immune to the Calici virus.
So I guess its back to the old control methods of shooting and warren ripping again.
Another problem I have is with wild pigs, deer and goats coming out of the hills to eat what I have left of my fodder crops. Really need a bigger gun as they just laugh at my 22 magnum. laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2006 14:43

Lucky we don't have pigs here but the rabbits are a pain. I reckon calici was only good around here for about a year 'cos we only found dead rabbits(with calici) once and the rest have been from good ol myxo.

on what type of gun for pigs well I would go at least 223 but reckonfor deer and pigs the 308 is the way to go. Just have to be careful of what is behind the target if you miss! Hell 22mag would hardly bruise a pig! Just enough to get 'em grumpy! laugh
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/12/2006 18:14

Quote:
Originally posted by Farmer:
Same thing here Adon with the rabbits. The local RLPB have done some collecting and sampling of wild rabbits around here and found that most are now immune to the Calici virus.
So I guess its back to the old control methods of shooting and warren ripping again.
Another problem I have is with wild pigs, deer and goats coming out of the hills to eat what I have left of my fodder crops. Really need a bigger gun as they just laugh at my 22 magnum. laugh
You need a 243 for the pigs.
Don't you muster the goats & sell them? That is what most of the property owners in the Far West are making a living out of at the moment.Wild goats. :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/12/2006 22:13

Merry Xmas,Happy New Year to all.
I hope it rains,rains & rains.
Nice soft soaking general rains for the whole country.
:cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 07:43

Some mongrel 'collins st ' farmers have just done the big diddle on a local bloke here......he purchased a flock to go with his newly expanded property (get bigger they said) only to find a few months on they have Johne's.
Ag department have basically condemned his whole flock while also finding that the property the sheep came from has changed hands at paper level and the corporation that sold the diseased stock have disappeared into the paperwork....and the history looks like they were well aware of what they were doing and covered their tracks.

Now this neighbour has his new land to pay for and no flock.....his stockagent takes no responsibility ......ag dept can't track the previous owner even though all the paper work and tagging was in place
.....what a crock all this tracing of stock through tagging ....when a string of corporations allows them to cover their tracks of who actually owns it and therefore avoids any liability.

I was rewiring/mending his old Bedford tray truck yesterday (his only truck) when he told me all about all this(he has to float all his sheep about his property now as his dieseased sheep aren't allowed on the road...what a load of crap he is in ....can't use his existing rams either and will have to buy new......it just goes on and on
.....and he payed top money for this flock .....time some of these rip off merchants were gut shot mad
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 08:53

Same thing happened to my ex-brother-in-law, only with stud Holstein-Friesians. Being a classifier, he had some of the best bred dairy cows in Oz and just needed a couple more bloodlines to make his herd complete. He bought a couple of top bred cows from a farm that was dispersing and with the good price he paid thought he was getting a bargain. Six months later his herd started getting sick, so he called in the vet... turned out that all but a couple of cows had Johne's disease. ALL the cows were destroyed and the land quarantined for 25 years... not a critter to be placed upon it and signs up everywhere... and he couldn't sell the place either.

The owner of the two diseased cattle had disappeared into the woodwork, no one would take responsibility and with 10 children to feed, David was back on the road classifying cattle with a heavy heart and an empty pocket.

He's only got a couple more years left on the quarantine now and I would imagine it'll be how quick he can sell the place and retire.

Corporations have a lot to answer for. mad
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 08:57

Oh yes...

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to one and all.

Hope it's a safe, happy and wet one.

Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 12:08

I was just speaking with a Ag dept guy I tripped over while playing autosparky this morn, who suggested that 25 years may have been applied originally but would have since been seen to be too long.....maybe the land is free and clear now Helen as they say now only two reasonably hot summers and the land is free to use......and we've had a few of them.
He also explained how worlds apart the bovine variety of Johnes is from the sheep strain.

Bedfords running like a bought one with new found insulation on her wiring ....and I cranked up his hasn't worked for ten years AM truck radio at the same time which made his day .....trivial things but he needs some joy in his life and every little bit helps wink
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 13:17

Thanks for that ifo, Mike... of course him being my ex's brother, I haven't had contact for quite some time... good to know that info though. smile

Glad to hear that the truck's running a pearler and what a bonus to get the old radio going as well... great stuff and just in time for Chrissy, too. laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/12/2006 16:08

He's much happy today, someones done a nice deal with him for Suffolk rams .......and I think the farmer in him has taken over and he's thrown his whingers hat in the ute and gone to introduce these young lads to what remains of his crossbreed ewes.
Resilient bunch these farmers smile
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 20:33

We left here on the 23rd travelled to Wagga Wagga,yes indeed it is very dry there but you still have ground cover,lucky people,stock still look good.
Then we went to Beechworth,so very sad to see everything looking dry & distressing,Hume Weir shocked to see that eek eek still looking at ground cover.Drove around ,seeing drought affected areas,special interest at Yarrawonga nice place,cheap housing,waterfront views laugh cool
Driving back to our town ,no,groundcover,red dirt,very depressing.
Listening to radio coverage of El Nino "may/could " be over by March?
False hope or any truth???
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 21:35

Yeah we have next to no cover now apart from the best stubbles from last year and the crappy ones from this year. Our neighbour has 900ac south of our house that has been blowing it T*ts off for the last 2 months but finnaly he has ripped it so we are not getting so much now. They are talking rain for us late next week. Well that would be nice to get but that also means summer weeds and spraying and money going out the door again so mixed blessing of sorts. If we get a heap we may get some feed so we will be able to stop feeding but reckon no chance of that.

Got an interview at the sand mine in Pooncarrie in Jan so will be moving off farm for a while of it goes well.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 22:05

Heather I don't think anyone really knows...As we seem to be in unchartered waters with this one.
Feb Mar has been in the past the traditional time of year for El Nino (Walker Circulation) to end...Google it. There is always much hype made about this by the Media as we have seen tonight on some TV News coverage with some even saying drought breaking rains are on the way ? In the present circumstances I think this is cruel
Many El Ninos in the past have ended like this with flooding rains that Dorothea McKellar wrote of. Some however do not & linger well into the following year....Summer rains though are not much effected by El Nino
Keep a close eye to the BOM site & in particular the Seasonal Outlook of El Nino Wrap Up along with the 12 Seasonal computer Enso models for next year.

Happy trails
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 22:31

We were both interested to see what we presummed where bales of stubble left over in the rice paddies travelling back towards Griffith.Are they used for feeding stock?? Seems to be a lot around & a lot of farmers baleing the leftovers .

I hope the drought is over & ends in March,but I have heard it too many times to really belive it.
For all those relying on rain (isn't that all farmers)I hope it is true :cheers:
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 23:05

I think in the past Heather rice stubbles have been burnt as it is not so good for hay fodder but with the way things are whatever can be baled up for animal feed is being utilised....The bales however could have been from cereals which is also grown in those sites.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 23:21

All the rice that ws grown last summer would have been burnt by now as goddy says it would not be good for stock feed. Prolly was cereal stubble. I have friends cutting it now. Getting good money for it too lucky buggers!
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/12/2006 23:34

Hi there Adon
Hope all goes well for you with the sand mine interview... May that be a great start with a job for 2007 followed by some drought breaking rains to come home to.

Happy trails with 07 Adon :cheers:
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/12/2006 20:41

Thanks for the replies,interesting.

Just in case I don't get back on here for a while.
Happy New Year to all of you & I hope it rains,rains & rains.
I really feel for all of you who are on the land & trying to keep your heads above water & trying to earn a living (no pun intended) :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/12/2006 00:14

Hi All, belated Merry Xmas & early Happy New Year to u all - well our life has been in a bit of a whirl of late, on 23rd November the Road Aurthority finally agreed on a price & paid us for the animal park & we had to close that day becos of public liability insurance, but can lease the house back while we build a new house on an adjoining block not impacted on by the new highway.
yesterday we signed the transfer for the cattle block after 22 months of negotiation, finally got them to accept that the land was future development land not farm land, (very big difference in compensation) so apart from our deer farm and venison at growers market we r semi retired --- ha ha as we seem to never have been so busy in our life getting all the different bits finished off!!!
however it was great to have our whole family home around the homestead dinner table for the last time together with me meeting my 10 month old grandson for the first time, then my daughter finally announced her engagement - boy has that taken some time!!!! but it really made a great christmas, especially not having to have the park open, the first time in 18 years!
so sad to hear of continuing dry over east, no too flash in whaetbelt, but we have feed eveywhere and hay is selling fast for those who trade it some up to $80 per roll - we r still a bit old fashioned and charge our normal rate of $45 a bale for this years and $35 for old season bales, don't believe in making profit out of others misfortune believing same people would help us if we were in need.
so life rolls on, i make venison smallgoods 3 mornings a week, growers market Saturdays & once things settle down hope to do more fishing wink wink
best wishes to u all, & i hope to get back to joining in with u all a bit more in 2007 than this year!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/12/2006 08:51

Hi Fine Elsewhere

Nice to see a report come in from you & to know you have had some wins with the Authority behind the land purchase...Hope that includes a nice Off Ramp to the Deer Farm. Also to remember don't work so hard in retirement & to make a few more regular reports for us.
Farmers being farmers over here are all just relieved this year is over so they can look forward to the next one...Most appear to still be cheerful (on the outside at least) despite the happenings.

While on the keys I would like to wish you & everyone else who travels this road to WZ
All the Best for 2007 See you then

Happy trails ! :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/01/2007 01:06

Hi Goody, we have a plague of locust passing thru here ATM, pests of things have been heading for the south coast from inland since late November! & i recon those Wagga crows must all be over here having a feast!!! don't think i've ever seen so many locust or crows.....
just heard that 2006 was Perths driest year for about 1/2 a centuary - dry year has also seen wheat crop drop to 6 million tonnes from 12 million year before - from memory i think our biggest crop was around 15 / 16 million tonnes!
RE off ramp - i have the eastern section of the road right next to what used to be my (now Road Authority)eastern boundary, but i recon by the time they build the next western section i will have finished with the deer - i recon 2 years will see me out - i don't have my heart in it anymore, so i want to just slowly scale things down - thats the official version to please Mrs FE & family - i have a nagging feeling to go & buy another property further out where land prices are more realistic for farming, but the rest of the family keep reminding me that i probably would never get that running how i'd like it - clocks ticking by a bit quick now.... so i'll just wait and see what happens over next few months as i get use to lifestyle change.
Goody do Durnhams (sp) still have their Deer & Ostrich show going just out of Wagga...the father was older than me when i went & looked at it about 12 years ago - but i know he's got a few sons who worked there?
i'm reading "The Duke of Windsors War" by Michael Bloch -a wonderful book, & the first time i've been able to lie back in rocker and read for a few hours at a time - pure luxury. tomorrow its back to venison smallgoods making & i've got a load of hay to load with the old MF tractor which has a bad clutch - interesting game - i hope to get a chap to put a new clutch kit in if he can get hold of one - tractors about 35 yo... not over capitalised there wink wink
anyway we will probably get a bit of interesting weather up north over the next few days as it looks like first cyclone is on its way!
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/01/2007 10:22

FE
I'm glad that we still have some crows left in Aus as there are not many to be seen here these times....I believe in the early days there were lots there at Wagga Wagga about the lagoons of the river. I think also many flew in there to roost for the night. I have a few on my farm & am always telling them it is safe here so not to stray.
I did read that report about the low rainfall for Perth so am wondering how the water situation is going with your Dams ?
Now as far as I know the Durnhams still farm deer which was a big operation but will have a look for you the next time I go by & see. I know of one other along the Sturt Hwy East of Wagga Wagga near Borambola. Also see one over by Cootamundra way that I could identify as N.Z. Reds. All the Ostrich farming seems to have fallen by the wayside except for one chap who I know also near here who has many hundreds of them ....Sure is a strange sight to see hundreds of these birds out in the fields...I think his product is going to the U.S.
Over the past few days quite a few late afternoon storms have been about but no rain much to speak of. Still plenty of moisture infeed from the North Coast which is unusual to get down this far but it has been going right on through to Melbourne.
A wise man can always keep abreast of the times that see changes taking place about him & to know how to rise & meet this change. I think you are on track to doing that...Yes time is a thief & our race is run all to quickly.
Mine is done & I realize I must hasten some matters in life...Go to my Homepage in the above box FE & see Exercise a Devil in my Blog to catch up on my health.
I will have an answer for you & post after my next visit to town so in the meantime.

Happy trails
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/01/2007 16:56

Hi all hope everybody had a good New Year and wish everyone the best for 2007.

Well we have had a bit over the inch so far and could get a little more out of some storms to the NE but pretty good really! laugh I actually sowed some oats after the first storm we got and it got a nice little rain on it that night so hoping to get a little bit of feed off there. Nothing major but just ripped up some ground that had been drifting a little and it came up so nice I thought bugger it I'll broadcast some oats on there and see what happens. Will have to get some more tractor work done before I head off to the mine but just waiting to see what happens today. I think there is still talk of a good rain next week from this cyclone so we may have some subsoil moistur to work with this coming season. At least we will have some summer weeds to feed the sheep anyway!
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/01/2007 20:55

Good luck with the oats Adon. I did something similar. A couple of weeks ago I had a feeling that we might get a good season coming up, so I bit the bullet and put in 50 acres of turnip/millet mix. Well after 25 mm of rain on Friday and Sunday it is coming out of the ground already. Now I just have to watch that the grasshoppers don't get it all laugh laugh
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/01/2007 23:09

Not overly confident of getting much feed out of it as the ground is crap and it has set hard already so will need that rain on Sat to get things going again.

How do you reckon the rain has gone for the catchments over there?
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/01/2007 18:16

Anyone have any info on alpacas and sheep lice....if alpacas are susceptible to them and any known controls.
Also alpacas and yonnies disease info....seems to be none about at all.

The yonnies sheep bought from the market have brought lice as well.....easily delt with in sheep but no one appears to have information on lice and alpacas.
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/01/2007 19:59

Quote:
Originally posted by adon:
Not overly confident of getting much feed out of it as the ground is crap and it has set hard already so will need that rain on Sat to get things going again.

How do you reckon the rain has gone for the catchments over there?
The main part of Sundays storm that dumped 40 mm plus seems to have gone right over Googong, which is the main dam, so there should have been a lot of water flowing in to it.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/01/2007 22:11

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
Anyone have any info on alpacas and sheep lice....if alpacas are susceptible to them and any known controls.
Also alpacas and yonnies disease info....seems to be none about at all.

The yonnies sheep bought from the market have brought lice as well.....easily delt with in sheep but no one appears to have information on lice and alpacas.
Dilbert, when you talk about "yonnies" are you meaning OJD the disease in sheep? Because if you are you should be destroying them ASAP.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 07:10

Only Yonnies I know of Adon....the Ag Dept are in control and the property is under quarantine.
lots have been shot....all purchased last year in gippsland.

This properties not the worry....the property in gippsland they came from is unknown (and ear tags were fiddled)...owners unknown.....now there is a property in Gippsland that they know Yonnies sheep came from but they don't know were it is .....police and ag dept are still trying to find the previously owners of these sheep...the trail is nicely covered with a corporate paper chase.
Every sheep farmer in Australia would like to know that they found this property I'm sure .....but at the moment they are trying to get search warrants for accessing some Collins street farmers books who is the prime suspect.

The problems with the selling end.....they've ended up in an honest farmers hands who immediately rang the AG dept and they quaratined his farm....he's the honest one (broker by the minute) while the thieves who sold him the sheep have $68/head of the honest blokes money as well.

If it was me I'd take it personally and go blow the seller away.....no more paperwork then.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 07:38

On another note....who's fencing with the new Cyclone fencing system.....the tension rod on the corner stay pad snaps/breaks and the post comes out of the ground.....messy!
Here's my temporary fix....but we wait on cyclone to supply a bigger new stay as the weld repair I've done on this broken one is only a mend and not a fix.
I've inserted the pads on the pic with the broken stay... clickable to 220K pic

Crap idea in my opinion and I'll stick with the ironbark strainer posts thanks...new fangled crap with burnable plastic pads is not my idea of permanent fencing.
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 09:05

A few people are considering these for their Tomato Trellis' this year.
I agree with you Dilbert. Way too temporary for my liking too. I sold a few of these in the NT to the DPI for their trials, and that was about it. Haven't even sold one here.
No one else up there went near them. Stuck to steel pipe, or railway iron.

Cheers

Darran
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 09:16

Personally believe that no farmer had anything to do with it's design.....maybe some superannuated grape growers/ex telecom engineers thought they'd diversify after the grapes hit $300 a tonne smile
Posted by: Petros

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 09:29

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
Personally believe that no farmer had anything to do with it's design.....maybe some superannuated grape growers/ex telecom engineers thought they'd diversify after the grapes hit $300 a tonne smile
Do you mean that literally Dilbert - have table grapes had a good season this year?
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 09:35

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
Personally believe that no farmer had anything to do with it's design.....maybe some superannuated grape growers/ex telecom engineers thought they'd diversify after the grapes hit $300 a tonne smile
Telecom... Is there anything they can't do?
I haven't seen the Cyclone stays... Only Waratah, but I will have a chat to the rep about them. We're good mates, and I will see what I can find out.
Have you been in contact with Cyclone about them? Let me know, as I can track down the local sales rep's number for your region Dilbert.
You and him can have a "Chat" laugh

Cheers
Posted by: W W

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 10:22

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
On another note....who's fencing with the new Cyclone fencing system.....the tension rod on the corner stay pad snaps/breaks and the post comes out of the ground.....messy!
Here's my temporary fix....but we wait on cyclone to supply a bigger new stay as the weld repair I've done on this broken one is only a mend and not a fix.
I've inserted the pads on the pic with the broken stay... clickable to 220K pic

Crap idea in my opinion and I'll stick with the ironbark strainer posts thanks...new fangled crap with burnable plastic pads is not my idea of permanent fencing.
I can just imagine them out in this country,thinking of "Gundi" when I say that
:rolleyes: :cheers:
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 13:13

Hey Dilbert good to hear that you are going by the book with OJD. And pity you have been stuck with it. frown Our neighbour here will not comply with the brucelosis controls either and it makes it really hard when you are constantly worried about his sheep getting with yours. What's worse is that I have not seen an NLIS tag on any of them and there are no real fences to keep them in. We have found them nearly in town some morning and yet he is never pulled into gear by authorites yet if we did the same thing we would be trampled in no time! mad

I have been doing some drought assist work in Hattah NP putting up rabbit fences. We were using similar end assemblies up there but they were different in the pad to that one you have shown. We were all saying that we wouldn't use them on our places too. I would be sort of worried about putting a large strain of fence on them anyway actually. But I reckon that they are really temp and farmers would not use them on longterm stuff. Would be very interesting to see how a fire on them would go! wink
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/01/2007 21:32

FE
I went for a drive this afternoon to inspect the Deer Farm for you....This was so I had an excuse to message you & say Albany seems to be the centre of the Universe atm with the leftovers of Isobel coming back on your location. Hope all is well & the water off the Down Ramp is diverted straight down the well !

The Deer Farm is only a shadow it seems of its present glory with only a handful of deer to be seen. I drove right around & scanned thoroughly with my binocs to see sheep & where crops have replaced where these fine animals once dominated the scenery.

I am reluctant to use the word fizzer but that is how I see the leftovers of Isobel in reaching here....What rejoicing though for those in WA who were on the recieving end of its trip down south

Happy trails
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/01/2007 23:16

Hi Goody - sorry about the reply - wrote 1/2 page the other nite, hit the reply button, jumped over to Obs to look at Esperance rain, then looked up Ag forum today to see no reply - my computer skills don't improve!
Thanxs for looking at Durnhams, situation seems to reflect what i've heard over here - Eastern States wholesalers looking to the west for deer, but there aren't many spare here either! two of us seem to supply Perth, South West & South coast - me the latter ATM, don't know how long for, i might just look after wholesale (restaurants / butchers) & give Growers Markets a miss soon, as i was a foundation member of that group & only missed 4 Saturdays in 5 years - asked myself at 5am this morning what on earth i was doing racing about at that hour - habit more than need ATM - just hard to slow up....
Sad about Durnhams, it was a show place when i was last there in early 90's... seems to be the way of things rural these days unfortunately.
BTW i was very impressed with your Web/Home Page Ian - well done - u should starta consultancy for silly old sods like me who can't even get their posts out of their PC's shocked
looked like the "Joe Black" was in good health, u have inspired me to get on with a project i was thinking of on the 17 acre block i'm going to build our replacement house on, on the south side of what farm we have left. it has a small "damp" area which was cut out to plant pasture for milking cows that were here b4 us. always thought i'd like to fence 4 or 5 arces off in the hollow & replant a heap of local trees & bushes there to see if some little critters need a home, cos the highway extension will see a lot of road verge habitat go...
RE - Ex cyclone - i always thought it would be well east of us, we got about 3.5 mls & a bit of wind equal to a winter burst & quite frankly didn't want any rain as i still have fair bit of good dry feed & its too early for autumn break, don't want a germination yet!
now i'm going to try & post this lot as the war office says teas now cold - i thought it was going to be a cold tea anyway wink won't have time to correct - please forgive spelling etc.
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/02/2007 23:36

Neighbour of yours Adon, Wichieproof lad dropped in the visit today unintentionally ....pulled up in a bit of a rush just short of town with a missing steer tyre....and lucky we all were that this fully laden semi (wheat) wasn't on it side in the middle of town.

A nasty experience loosing a steer tyre with a full load....Warren was a bit shakey but still had a smile at how lucky he was that it happened on a nice straight rising road and the only things damaged were his nerves.
Posted by: silvercloud

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/02/2007 18:22

OMG he was soooo lucky. We've seen a few too many truck rollovers on the highway that runs through our town. They've kinda renamed South Western Highway the Woodchip Highway as the trucks that roll over most are carrying woodchips. One actually crashed into the awning of a shop in one of the towns in our shire spilling its load all over the road. Luckily that one didn't roll but the SES were called to shore up the front of the shop and clear the road of glass and woodchips.
Posted by: Pete Rothwell

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/02/2007 10:33

I went to an auction in Melbourne a few months ago and what I saw there made me never want to drive a truck again. There where about half a dozen truck recks being auction and the damage done to them was horrific. I couldn't quite imagine how any of the truck drivers would have survived, my guess is that they didn't. It really woke me up to the force that something wieghing 35t, and a lot more, and travelling at 100km/h has.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/02/2007 15:11

Fine Elsewhere Are you OK over there ?
Heard about the fire your way this morning & saw some footage of the Porongurup area. Fingers crossed you have not been burnt out eek
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/02/2007 01:04

Hi Goody & All, yep i'm fine thanxs Goody, i've been away in Perth for a while (daughters engagement do, looking at homes to see what Mrs FE wants me to build in her new shack etc) & came down Albany H'Way Sunday nite to see a huge cloud of smoke when we were about 80kms out of Mt Barker - had a hollow feeling in my gut becos at first i thought it was due south near home, but as we got towards Mt Barker i could see it was in the Porongurups...2 houses burnt on Monday, fire under control Wednesday. bad fire as a lot of it was in National Park where it was impossibvle to get access.
been a bad month for fires over here - further north at Dwellingup the other week 14 houses were burnt in a fire that lasted about 12 days.
lifes all over the place for us ATM - we've nearly found homes for most of the animals from the Tourist Park, i'm not going to growers market anymore, just doing wholesale venison which takes about a day a week. Main Roads contractors r ahead of schedule on stage 1 of the new highway which finishes at our eastern boundary. we r in stage 2 which so far they only have the money for land purchase, so we could be in our house for a while yet, which gives me more time to build a new house which i think will take about 12 months if i'm lucky.
BTW Adon, give that chap who lost his front tyre my regards, i lost the front tyre off my tractor on the highway one day - i was very red faced, but lucky it was right next to where our boundary started, so i cut the fence & drove it straight into my paddock leaving a big scrape right from bitumen thru the fence shocked - when i was a teenager, i was in a mini minor, going down a hill into Perth, when a tyre went passed us, much laughter until the right back corner hit the road & we realised it was off our car!!
anyway enough from me, thanxs for ur concerns - :wave: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/03/2007 01:55

Hi u "straw chewers" have any of u looked at the remifications of this new "superannuation" business for older people - i've spent a lot of the last month talking to accountants & f/planners (could call them something else but better not...) i wonder if at my age there really is any benifit to starting a self managed super fund, it seems to me on the surface that the only benefit is containing tax rate to 15% pa, but to do that it seems u have about $1,000 to $1,500 annual complience cost ie u need about $30,000 invested at 5 to 6% just to pay this cost? i had always thought that the sale of our farm would be my super fund as none of my kids want to come back here to live on smell of an oily rag.......seems to me that to get the big benefits govt sprouts about u'd need to have annual income in $100,000's - maybe i'm getting it all wrong? anyone else looked at this?
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/03/2007 13:38

Hi FE
Well, as far as I am concerned I left it all up to a f/planner we have & it has turned out pretty good over the last few years with the stock market going up etc. I have some money put into MLC MasterKey Units & Superannuation Fund. Over the last 12 mnths the performance has been 14.30% & 13.94% respectively. I know though that some people do not like self managed super funds ! The f/planner thought the last one should do better as it had been up to 16%. Besides this we were lucky enough back then to get into BHP Billiton & Rio Tinto at a good price. We have a good spread that is not to risky & are happy of course the way things have gone....Touch Wood !

Happy trails then & keep an eye to this Cyclone coming down the coast to your Ozspot. laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/03/2007 16:45

thanxs for that Goody, it gives me more faith to carry on down the path i'm travelling ATM. my accountant recons SMSF is the way to go as long as i'm healthy (reasonably sound of mind i guess is what he means wink ) so i've been doing some 5 - 10 year projections based on data as it is today (ie tax rates ect) i can only see the govt (any party) keeping some attractiveness to super to try & keep more off social security ....just seems we r a bit in the transition period of getting the workings right!
now i recon the n/west is well overdue for a cyclone - only had 1 so far this year & march/april is not too late by any means!
strange weather up north, in the Murchison they have had a "wind drought" and have had to cart water on some stations becos not enough wind for 3-4 weeks to run the mills!!!! i watched 3 very intertesting programs on ABC this week 1st on climate change & US politics (this Bush is a worrying chap)2nd on lightning, 3rd on Chinas demand for energy ie 60 new coal power stations & 40 planned N/E generation - the latter will take years to build & apparently put huge demand on cement & steel supplies (ur BHP shares like my Wesfarmers look damned good investment to me wink i really can't understand these folk who don't believe in global warming...the fish stock off our coast (complete food chain)is almost beyond self sufficiency - not thru over fishing but habitat change, cos some of the spicies i fish have never been commercially taken & theres only a couple of us along this coast that eat them (thru ignorance of preparation not taste)a number of steams from underground origin on the south coast have stopped running this year - lower rainfall & bigger demand from blue gum plantations (imo for tax minimisation not wealth production) on land that used to support grazing on a lower water demand?
anyway enough of my rambling, rotten fingers are too big for this keyboard, can u get big keyed keyboards i wonder - sure market for the future there wink
:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/03/2007 20:48

Just to confuse you further FE

A fellow on ABC Radio this afternoon said mineral commodities will for the next 10 yrs do very well....It will mean choosing the up & coming ones to invest with. I am assuming he thinks is to late to get on board with some of the old ones ?
Also heard Peter Costello saying today folk like us should not be investing in the Equity Market Super ??? As these are not Listed on the Share Market & therefore fraught with danger as some in the U.S. now are in trouble ?

Happy trails ! Watch George it has your name on it laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/03/2007 02:42

U might'nt be too far wrong there about George Goody - i was talking to a chap tonite about it, got to watch where the highs r when it comes back towards the coast - if its still at sea when it goes around Exmouth i'll start to cleaning up a bit - if its still at sea out from Carnarvon, it would be a bigger clean up, if its at sea out from Perth my yard will be spotlessly clean wink wink
i'll talk to u later in the week about shares & China - my brother in law went there last year - he's 70yo and came back as excited as a teenager about future resource commodity demands! he's also started producing bi diesel from his canola - he recons China will soak up world fuel production - he travelled on a 6 lane - 3 level highway system!!!!
too late for me now - catch u in a day or 2..
:wave: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/04/2007 01:57

Hi All belated Happy Easter to u all - hope u might have got some Easter rain - we did, just what we needed here on the south coast - 14 glorious MM's. already the germination from previous two weeks couple of showers has green pick up & away with more to come towards the end of this week - perfect especially when i'm now down to last 8 round bales of hay - cut it a bit too fine this year eek
i also got a bit of a fright, becos other years when i got low on bulk in paddocks, i got grain dust from the port - different chap has the contract now & takes it all to his own property - gave me a bit of a fright when i could'nt get it! anyway its funny how things turn out - just be4 Christmas one of the big supermarkets got some near out of date 1kg packets of peanuts - becos we used to have the tourist park (used to feed peanuts to pet kangaroos)they contacted us to see if we would cart these away to save them waste disposal costs - to my surprise there was a tonne of the things - anyway these were vacuum pack sealed, in 1kg bags 10 to a carton - so i put them in the shed with a heap of rat poison thinking they might come in handy over the next 12 months...when feed got shory i started mixing 1 kg peanuts with 3 kg of pellets - fantastic results - wonder if anyone else has used peanuts as stock feed???
anyway enough from me - hope a few others got to share some rain - well into autumn now - soon time to start cropping over here if a big rain comes in wheatbelt...
:wave: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/04/2007 22:56

Hi All, great rain right over sw corner of WA on Sunday - 90 mm the heaviest i've heard of - 20mm here - absolutely wonderful to boost easter germination - i'm still wondering if anyone has had any experience with peanuts as a stock feed?
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2007 07:46

had a walk around with Simon Ramsay in the Gannawarra shire yesterday. For a gumboot party bloke he's quite an impressive personality....no answers .....but interesting.
He say's he's been basically left to organise Vics MurrayDarling water deal with the Fed Govt himself...I certainly found that interesting .....I'd thought the deal was done ....but apparently not.

Off to Birchip this morn to see how the country looks out there....that's Adon Country I believe.....might takes some snaps.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2007 08:03

He also said that his own property in loosing $16,000/mth at the moment with the cost of feed ....and he didn't even blink when he said it.

These numbers are far too scarey for me .....gotta have respect for these farmers that keep trying.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/04/2007 16:20

Bit greener into the Mallee as we drove west today around Donald .....lots of guys opening ground and massive amounts of gypsum going in also.
Township of Birchips cute.....a famous CWA cairn to country women is nth of town and it one reason I went there ....got my pics wink

......and some of the Birchip Bull.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/04/2007 00:10

Hi Dilbert - very interesting comments there re ur country trips etc especially interested in gypsum? whats a tonne of gypsum worth out there?BTW big bit of bull in that pic! i recon people with AWB shares could be in for an interesting 12 months - the class actions have started - i could be wrong but i recon these class actions will just keep rolling on until all moneys gone (mainly to legal eagles i guess)
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/04/2007 08:04

Member of our family (prick relation) is up to his ears in that AWB fiasco ....absolute car salesman type that I can't stand (married the dolly wife and all (ex long term myers model and very very blonde)

Sorry about profiling ...but I had a family arguement the first time I met him (slimmy creep he is)....and it wasn't 'til he went down with the AWB debarcle that we find out how dangerous it is having these glorified white goods salesmen doing internation deals for us.

Put me on the jury and you'll see the key thrown away wink

Gypsum?...I'm picking up my loader/backhoe today as she's been out handling lime herself .....local dirt doctors borrowed her so I can get a 'real' price off him and will post it later.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/04/2007 10:47

Here's where the biggest lies started....this is the bit where our DFA washes their hands of any knowledge .....though Nigel
Former AWB executive, Nigel Officer, admitted to the inquiry that the wheat contracts sent to the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAT) and the United Nations did not provide the full picture.
He says they did not mention trucking fees imposed by the Iraqi Grains Board because AWB knew it was what he called a 'grey area' that might contravene UN sanctions.
Asked if it was a deliberate decision not to reveal details to DFAT or the UN, Nigel Officer said, "...it was not a deliberate decision not to advise them."
(that's corporate talk for 'Ssssshh!!')
"Just to leave them uninformed?" asked Commissioner Terence Cole
"Correct", Mr Officer said.
"That was the decision that was taken?" asked Counsel Assisting the Commission, John Agius SC.
"That was the decision taken, yes." Mr Officer replied.
"Whose decision?" Mr Agius asked.
"That was a collective corporate decision." Mr Officer said

From this story

...Nigels keeping sweet with the Howard/Downer camp should guarantee him continuing employment when he gets out laugh

The AWB fiasco came up with Simon Ramsey earlier in the week ....and he is of the common view that 'every country was into it' quote.

That's what should be investigated....not the nuts and bolts at the coal face .....but investigate an unethical system that allows it to happen.

My heart goes out to those farmers who thought they should back the AWB by buying shares ......just to have their loyalty rubbed in their faces ....that's the travesty that will maybe tip some troubled farmers minds and see them walk off their land in disgust.
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/04/2007 12:04

Hello All,
I guess you have all heard the statement from Mr Howard about the Murry/Darling.
No drawing water from it unless for personal use.If there is no SUBSTANTIAL rain in the next two months.
I really feel for all you people who rely on that water system for your farming needs,you wont even be able to water your animals.
Bloody sad state of affairs.
I am waiting for the price of fruit & veges to skyrocket now,I don't think the prices will stay low for to long.
I put some pics of the Darling at Tilpa on the Zone a couple of months back,it was nearly dry then.
Well now it is.


Funny people that live in the bush,gotta love them ,at Louth this weekend they are having a Dinner on the riverbed of the Darling to raise money to build a new hall in the town.
Big posh event ,black tie,shorts & thongs.
I love it.
We would have went only we have a wedding to go to.


I just hope you all get some decent rain & soon.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/04/2007 08:22

Maybe should start a thread about availability of water from standpipes around Aus.
Local water authority (Coliban) has talking about locking up stand-pipes for stock use.

Local farmers here have been carting water to sheep and cattle as the local dams are dry ....that's about to stop in this district.

So all you townies better send the RSPCA up to the bush because all the farmers here are about to let their sheep die of thirst.
Mutton will be cheap for a week and then there will be none.

Your average lettuce growers in trouble too with no water allocation......$10 bucks each by xmas is my guess smile

As I said somewhere else ....the planet, she's screwed!
Posted by: Dazza_XL

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/04/2007 15:22

Everything is in Full Swing here at the moment. Stakes are starting to go into the Tomatoes, and the Caps are firing as well.
Beans are going in the ground as we speak. Plenty of country put aside for them this year.
Will get my finger out and take some snaps this weekend.

Cheers
Posted by: Carl Smith

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 26/04/2007 17:30

Hi All.

I have started a new topic in General Weather called:
Urban Heat Island Effect - Australian rural sites

There is a list of rural sites in the opening post, and I thought some of you might have some valuable information regarding how 'rural' some of these sites really are.

Thanks in advance for any information you are able to provide.

Carl.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 04:06

Just want to take my hat off to all those farmers opening ground in the area...I wish them well smile
I look after a few of these outfits electrical issues ......and we had this ones seeder computer on my bench all day yesterday....farmer John was having a coronary. He's got two of these setups and 8000 acres to sow.

A few combinations like this one that I'm the sparkie for started yesterday and are out there as I type (touch wood) Sitting next to the phone waiting on a breakdown here and I can't sleep laugh ....these blokes have nerves of steel.....imagine turning all this equipment and money out on the possibility of rain :rolleyes:
As I said "My hats off to anyone opening ground cool "
Might call around on the UHF and see how their doing...they must have the dawn horrors about now smile
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 08:30

Its incredible when you see the paddocks being worked 24 hours a day. When I was living in Junee a few farmers were a bit late in getting their canola in I think it was and with a considerable rain event progged were working around the clock to harvest.

Quite surreal to see the harvesters, glowing in a see of straw.

And jesus that's an amazing bit of equipment there Dilbert, can't imagine how much it would be worth.

:cheers: Will
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 09:48

I'm seeing some paddocks worked all night! But they're not growing anything useful, they've planted the new Defence HQ right up in a lovely, green productive valley. They're doing the earthworks right now, and in the night it's a sea of little flashing red lights as the machines stooge around busily.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 10:30

Hi Bigwilly. the gear in the photo above is about medium sized gear so all up, the combo at a rough guestimate new price would come out at about the $400K mark.
Some of the big rubber tracked crawlers that can run at 30kph down the roads you pay pretty close to the half mill $ for the tractor alone.
The farming game is about big bikkies but the costs are also real big bikkies so if you get a bad year you lose a fair bit.
If you get a run of bad years like all farmers in the SE of Oz have had over the last ten years you can, do and have for most around here, lost a million or two dollars and that takes years to recover from.
The reasons for the slow recovery are the prices farmers are now getting for their produce.
In the 1930's, 40's and late 60's and through the 70's a tonne of wheat, in value, was roughly equal to about the weekly minimum wage of the same time.
At today's prices for wheat, it now takes about 2.5 tonnes [ it was about 3.5 to 4 tonnes before the 2006 drought ] of wheat to equal the minimum weekly wage of over $500.
So relative to everybody else we are only getting a third of the price that we received as little as 30 years ago.
[ Prices of our inputs of course have risen at rates close to the general wage rate rises.]
The same ratios apply across most food products but you the consumer are largely missing out on these low prices and I don't need to tell you who is getting the profits.
Ask yourselves how and if you could survive under this sort of price and income situation.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 12:35

The guys here buy these JDs off lease out of queensland/WA ....the tractor pictured came from out of West Aus with 4500hrs and cost $45,000 (but as I said he has a few of 'em, the others have duels and more hp and are at Quambatook this week opening ground too) .....then about $40,000 more to replace the OE filters and oil (kidding but nearly)
Second hand seeder that came without a puta .....and all the swivels on the points were frozen and had to be replaced....mostly all labour and that made it possible for a little acerage Vic bloke to afford what's seen as a big outfit here on the edge of the mallee
....go 50 kms west and everyone who's trying is on big acres and using rubber tracked crawlers as Rom talked about.
I get a big fat cream filled home made cake sometime today (apparently a tradition) if the outfit runs through the night without a hitch.
Electricals are the only thing a Johnnie ever seems to have trouble with.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2007 12:45

Adding some thoughts to ROMs post.....
Neighbours boy bought a worn header same as his dads at auction for 11 grand (worth about $40 new).....employed an experience mechanic/rebuilder for a week and pulled it down.....cleaned and repaired every little bit of the thing for a good couple of mths.....then got the expert back for a week and reassembled it.
This they did while they had no crop to harvest last year ......the lads 21 now, bought his own property and has a mortgage that scares me to death ....but these are the boys we need .....motivated and can do.
I hope they get a few good years now wink
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/05/2007 00:43

Hi All, "The changing face of australian farming"..the capitalisation of todays farming ventures is quite frightening to me new headers $400,000+ or good secondhand JD 9650 headers etc 3,000 to 4,000 hrs $175,000 to $215,000 for one bit of gear add outfits like in that pic above, roadtrain, multi axle field bins....chemicals $50,000 /$100,000 = add bit of fertilizer $400 tonne here atm where does it end?
2 of the biggest old long owned faminlies farming properties down here have just been leased out....quite amazing, farmers too old to keep farming, nobody prepared to pay land values way over what the farm will actually produce, so leasing is the next progression! leasing prices also a bit frightening to me - unconfirmed at $60 + fertilizer & rates with some high producing smaller properties at $80 per ha per year...not for me! talking about costs, i just bought 50m roll of double insulated underground electric fence wire, the old one (about 5 years ago) still has sticker on $29 - the one i just purchased $67 - now i don't know of any primary product that would have an electric fence component that has encreased by anywhere near 1/4 of that rate???? there in lies the sad story...imputs go up by over 100% in 5 years....
price for our processed venison has gone up 15% in the same period...super, copper, zinc $400 tonne...not hard to see why less people involved in farming every year.....& australians recon that oz produced food will always be available?!? dream on...this is situation without factoring in any climate change this is just imput costs!
too depressing for me - off to bed :wave: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/05/2007 00:48

Hi straw chewers, great rain thru large bit of eastern states - great pics on TV showing pools of water - get that grain in the ground boys - might get bogged next wink i went up to Perth last weekend, things r still very thirsty up thru great southern - this week will hold the key for the great southern 3 to 4 days of rain forecast for end of the week, but things don't look too bright for northern areas...down here on the south coast the pasture is almost like spring, but no runoff yet & many water holes need a good drink!
hope u r all slopping about in water over there & have those tractors going...
:wave: FE
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/05/2007 12:37

G'day people's! Yes lovely and damp here now and still haven't been able to get a tractor on a paddock yet and I have to head back off to the mine tomorrow. Just finished crutching some lambs and know trying to get the spray contractor out to spray the paddock. I had to get a contractor to do the sowing for me because he has the proper setup for no till and I don't have the time. Now my problem is getting seed/fert in the paddock ready for him. Still too wet on the road to get the truck down there but prolly would get through a joining padddock. Getting fert first thing tomorrow and a friend is bringing some seed over as I have none from last year.

I am looking at getting a small spray rig as we have got our spraying done by contract but I reckon if I am to do down the no till path I need to get a sprayer so I don't have to wait to get spraying done. I only want a small one as they are cheap at clearing sales and I would only do knockdown and pre emergent with it.

I know now though I will not be able to run the farm properly while working on the mine I am at. I am so far behind that it will cost me later on and it is too late to do much about it. Dad want's me to take over next year(at least the crop side of things) and I reckon that I will have to either stop mining of get work closer to home to do it properly.

I suppose the next step is to get a seeder set up for no till and a tractor to handle it. All second hand for me ATM no way I could afford new.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/05/2007 12:39

Hi FE. Yep. they are really getting rolling around here in the cropping areas of NW Vic.
Probably amongst the best opening rains, cropping wise, that have been seen around here for many a long year.
From a morale point of view, these rains would arguably be the best rains in a generation, something that any farmer who has been through the last ten years or so would probably agree with.
Again, from a morale point of view, the rains may just prove to be, in the most literal sense, a life saver for some individuals who were really just running right against the ragged edge.
We have a long, long way to go before we see any income in say feb of 2008 and a hell of a lot more money to flow out before then but we know now that we are at least in there with a chance.
Thanks for your kind thoughts. Cheers!
Posted by: reallyisolatedshowers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/05/2007 17:11

Aah ROM was over your way staying at Horsham last weekend! :wave: Country is certainly looking a lot better along the drive from Lucindale, I must say. And FE a lot of tractors are ploughing ground everywhere. Well, in between the bluegums - seems to be a few of them between Lucndale, Penola and Hamilton. Amazing. We've had two inches here now. Grass is coming and it has been a bit like spring growth with the warmer weather and showers to date. We don't have crops, just cattle, but several neighbours do. A lot of new people farming in the past 10 years or so in our area now. (SE of SA) Cropping started in a big way around 1995 and there are a lot of people who have never seen one of the normal wet winters of pre 1990s. A lot of people have sold off their stock during the drought and will be cropping even more this year as stock are getting pricey to buy in for them. The 21 year old Dibert talked of - now we do need more of them!
Hope you all have a great season. :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/05/2007 01:26

Hi all, those posts r some of the best news i've read on WZ Ag section for a few years - yes one rain doesnt a season make, but gee its must be a great feeling to get some seed in the ground, & i guess there would still be a fair bit of warmth there in that damp ground to get germination up - good start.... really hope u all get those bins full come Christmas time
... just hope our boys get an inch this week - its getting on a bit & don't wont to be too late with these early & drier springs we have been getting!
BTW i like that "reallyisolatedshowers" handle, made me smile - good to see ur post & hope we have more...
very best wishes to u all,
:wave: FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/05/2007 07:24

...but did you read the profile laugh
"Favourite weather: rain
Most memorable weather experienced: rain
My least favourite weather is: no rain"

....probably a farmer :rolleyes:
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/05/2007 08:36

Quote:
Originally posted by Dilbert:
...but did you read the profile laugh
"Favourite weather: rain
Most memorable weather experienced: rain
My least favourite weather is: no rain"

....probably a farmer :rolleyes:
Occupation: Journalist/Farmer. wink

Speaking of farming... all is good here. Our little oat crop is up 3" high and looking healthy and happy. We are light 9 horses, 4 dogs and a boarder. Finally all is back to a state of normallacy and feed will be plentiful for our 2 horses come spring.

...and I'm fitter, lighter and healthier than I've ever been. :cheers:
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/05/2007 09:42

Hi All. I reckon those 21 year olds will be lining up to go farming in the next few years. It will take time but some real interesting data is now starting to emerge re the world food supplies, something I have been spouting on about for the last 5 or 10 years but who the hell wants to listen to an old uneducated cockie?
An interesting interview on the Vic ABC rural hour the other day.
One of the big wheels in a large financial organisation was giving some figures.
Food prices relative to income have been coming down for the last 300 years but his organisation believes we have reached the bottom and food prices, relative to incomes are going to start to rise from now on. He went on to say that the consumer can soon start to expect to pay much more for their food than in the past.
[ Another financial analysis publication also gave figures showing a 54 year cycle in commodity prices. This was based on a study done in the early 1950's, which was based on 300 years of historical wheat prices in the UK. The forecast in 1954 was that wheat prices would bottom in about 2006 in this cycle and then continue to rise through to at least 2033. ]

Our problem from the farmers view point, is to get our share of the action!
This doesn't worry me as the only way food prices will rise is if there are shortages developing which I have been expecting to happen sooner or later. If shortages occur then there isn't enough to go around and the big retailers and processors will just have to bid up and pay to get their requirements from the producers.
What really worries me is the probability of the very large corporations moving into the purchasing of land and tieing it up so that they control the food chain from one end to the other.
If the financial houses are talking up food prices and possible food shortages developing in the next decade or so you can bet that some big corporations are already doing their sums on land and food chain control.
The International Grains Council in their monthly grain summary report [ http://www.igc.org.uk/en/publications/grainmarketreport.aspx and down load the pdf summary. ] gives figures that show a reduction in world grain stocks of 100 million tonnes since 2002 / 03, the smallest stocks since the 1970's when there were only about 5 billion, not 6.5 billion people to feed.
I simply don't think we can expand our food production by something like 40% to feed and just maintain current living standards for a world population of 9 plus billion people by 2050.
Any way check it out at the IGC site above if you are interested.

Helen, I also had a horse once that also kept me fitter, lighter and healthier too, just trying to catch that bloody animal!
Cheers!
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/05/2007 23:08

Well ROM we may be coming into better times but geez it's hard trying to get a start! I am going through hell in getting my own overdraught bank acc. ATM. I had a call from this buisness bank bloke today. He noticed that my income had gone up substantially in the last few months from working on the mine. Yet they have been stuffing me around somthing terrible for over a months now and I am just about to threaten to take ALL my banking somwhere else. It's amazing that the last few years(when I was just about broke) I was getting constantly hammered by increase my credit card but when it comes to me asking for funds to start buisness I am not the ideal candidate for an overdraught.

All I can say is how the hell can sombody get a start when they cannot get finance to start??! I will have enough money from the mine to pay for the paddock I am putting in but it annoys me that I have to use money I have been saving to pay off the rest of my car. It's not like I am asking for big buck all I need is 20 F#*@ing grand!
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/05/2007 07:51

And that Adon is the trouble! Young guys like yourself who are the future are getting a bucketing from the banks due to the big wheels who are supposedly running the banks and who have big tickets on themselves re their own egos being just too bloody ignorant and stupid and short sighted to be able to see that not long into the future we are going to need young, highly motivated and skilled young guys as food producers.
The big banks have been very consistent in totally misreading the future as we saw when they closed most of the rural branches a decade ago. They just arrogantly assumed that agriculture was finished and that no one had any other options than to continue to deal with them and bad luck sport! You are just going to have to drive another 50 or a 100 kms to do your business with us.
They failed totally to forsee the rise of alternate sources of finance like the Bendigo and they are now rushing around reopening some branches to retain their customers. Its a bit late as a lot of those customers, once gone won't be back.
There won't be any change in the big banks attitudes until the shortages start to hit then as usual all sorts of outfits will be throwing money at agriculture and anything else rural.
I saw this happen in the 1970's when wheat hit $150 / tonne when world shortages occurred due to crop failures in the old USSR. These prices stayed there for the next couple of years. The equivalent price now would be around the $350 / tonne.
The same thing happened in the wool boom of the early 1950's.
The banks were rushing around everywhere opening new branches and sending car loads of executives out to meet individual farmers to get them to bank with them
But until there are shortages of basic foodstuffs and prices go through the roof, the banks and finance outfits of every colour will pour their money into sleazy, dodgy and ultimately failure bound hedge and equity funds and to hell with the people who actually produce all the needs that keep this civilisation going.
Posted by: reallyisolatedshowers

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/05/2007 21:45

Agree with you ROM.
Adon hope you take your banking elsewhere!!! We do $10 an hour jobs on the farm like fix a gate or fence, and $500 per hour jobs, like go through the hassle of reviewing our finaces and insurance. But for some reason we happily do the $10 an hour jobs and see them as important, and we despair over the $500 an hour jobs in the office!! Overdrafts are really expensive these days for farmers. But that is what we've traditionally used. Best type of loan for faremrs these days seems to be a a line of credit style facility - you only pay for what you use. Landmark is one of the cheapest with this style of facility in SA - they have just taken over the Adelaide Bank Rural portfolio. Not sure about Vic.
Alternatively, have lots of friends in Vic who use specialist rural finance organisations instead of banks - one is Southern Finance ltd, especially for farmers, based at Hamilton I think. Not sure if that is any help, but don;t ever let those banks make you feel bad, just change!!
Also, have been thinking about this world shortage of food. Do the countries who need the food most have the capacity to pay for it?? Then we also face the issue of corporate farming. McQuarie Bank is apparently gearing up to buy 200 farms to run sheep, cattle and crops. They already have MIS scheme supported bluegums etc. I think corporate farming is the biggest threat to small farmers other than that "d" word drought. Aaaah. All too much to think about :rolleyes:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/05/2007 00:20

Hi all, yes adon i know exactly what u mean, i'm semi retired now, but over the last 25 years when we were trying to keep things together there was no help...only at 18%, now we out of the game & cashed up due to govt land resumption negotiations we get unsolicited offers from banks offering to give us more credit!!!! absolute madness....
adon i read thru ur situation the other nite & got thinking what i might do, just wondered if while ur on a regular income stream at the mine which is very helpful, cos we don't know yet if we'r out of the woods so to speak, is it worth u getting someone to do a bit of share cropping on ur place? for sure it limits ur income, but might save u having to increase debt a bit - just a thought? might be a way of having a bit of both good worlds ie regular income & keeping farm ticking over...anyway u'l know whats best..
:wave: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/05/2007 01:52

Hi all, rain, rain & more rain - 31mm since Friday nite 7mm so far tonite since 6pm & raining hard for last hour- winters here now, hope its getting into the crops areas...
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/05/2007 21:28

Fantastic news FE. Nothing too much here at the moment, but some precipitation is forecast for tomorrow. Certainly the cooler temps are going to make it feel like winter has arrived.

Our oat crop is now 4-5" high in places and the weeds are having a grand old time growing in places where they shouldn't, but better than nothing at all on the place.

We're now back to two horses as well, with eldest daughter moving out again and taking her tribe of 9 horses and 4 dogs with her.

Hubby and youngest daughter head off for their northern adventure on Thursday, so get to escape the cold. They'll just love the theme parks of the Gold Coast having never been before.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/05/2007 21:38

yes Helen u should get a bit, i see esperance got more today as front moves east. final tally here after a very wet nite last nite was 43.5 mm for weekend making total to date for May 72.5 (av 94mm) total ytd 223.5mm (av end may 235mm) very close to avarage now!! not so good further inland & very worrying in east & northern wheatbelt - i hear some cropping not started up there yet - not a big growing period left.
it was good that u put those oats in early wink wink still some good growing time ahead 4 u - well done....
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/05/2007 11:17

Wow, "get a bit" was an understatement. laugh 25.5mm of rain for this system and wind gusts up to 145km/h. eek 'Tis good though as we've passed our 46mm May average (53.4mm this month).

Our ytd rainfall is 312.6mm (average 112mm), so we're doing extremely well so far. Of course January's unseasonal rainfall helped this total tremendously as did April's phenomenal falls. Only February was rainless.

Let's hope this all bodes well for the rest of the country. A lot of our fellow farmers are doing it oh so tough and need as many of our well wishes as we can give them. smile
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/05/2007 11:41

We are doing very well rain wise here around Horsham as well.
57mms in the last few days of April and another 58 so far in May out on our place about 25 kms north of Horsham.
A lot of areas around here can easily top that with up to 100 plus mms in the last couple of weeks in storms and heavy rain in various locations around here. This on top of a 50 or so mms in mid January.
First time I have seen water starting to lay in the table drains along side of the dirt tracks since the very early 90's.
Probably the best opening rains in a generation as far as morale is concerned and perhaps a "lifesaver" in the most literal sense as I am not sure that some could have taken another year of dry or drought.
It is real good to see that other areas and people are also sharing or starting to share in the rains as well particularly my fellow forumees [ what a word!! ].
Even our reservoirs in the mountains are just starting to get a small amount of runoff after sufficient rain to soak the soil.
May all of you get the rain you want and we will all be smiling!
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/05/2007 13:58

I got 9mm last night. The ground was still damp from last week's 25mm event, and I'd turned off the bore and the irrigation (treez). So that's off for at least another week. The dam is half full for the first time in years, but it's stressed the wall, and there's been a giant cave-in! So that's another job, truckling dirtand rocks down there with the Kubota. Don't want to lose the water that's now coming.

Weeds are in full force though, the Patto's curse has resurrected itself, and it's even flowering. Squeaky leaves, so shall hit them with the poison again. Anyone know the best stuff for Patto's? Everything else is under control.

Tons o roos. Grass cover is OK but not spectacular. I think we are moving back into "normal" early winter patterns, which is awesome. Windyest night in ages (years?) last night, I had to move bedrooms as the western one was being attacked by the wind and rain.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/05/2007 20:24

Hi ant !

Igran at 700 mls / ha will do wonders with messr Paterson ....Make sure though the temp is under 20 & no frosts will happen for at least 3 days after. Otherwise Broadstrike at 25gms / ha is another option however this chemical does better in warmer temps where Igran likes the cool wet conditions.
Happy trails & spray early ! laugh
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2007 12:29

Excellent, thanks for that Goody. I wondered if anything would work in teh cooling/damper conditions. It's an odd time to spray but the buggers are growing (and council is threatening weed inspections in June). I keep hitting them intermittently, but Pattos isn't a weed for nothing, I guess.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2007 16:12

Hmmm. Apparently we have been using Metsulfuron. There's some suspicion though that it seems to be nuking everything and nothing grows in the soil left behind for a while after the Patto's is gone. Have you noticed or heard anything like that?
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2007 17:35

Metsulfuron, ie; Ally is a residual type herbicide which remains active for weeks or even months when the soil has a high PH or a high alkalinity.
Very low quantities can still be toxic to some or most legumes and some other plant species.
There are various companies formulating metsulfuron so just google say Ally and you will get a good idea of it's characteristics and restrictions from the chem companies sites.
Posted by: Farmer

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 31/05/2007 21:35

Quote:
Originally posted by ROM:
Metsulfuron, ie; Ally is a residual type herbicide which remains active for weeks or even months when the soil has a high PH or a high alkalinity.
Very low quantities can still be toxic to some or most legumes and some other plant species.
There are various companies formulating metsulfuron so just google say Ally and you will get a good idea of it's characteristics and restrictions from the chem companies sites.
Totally agree, the range of activity depends on the plant. Wheat can be planted after 10 days, oats 6 months and most clovers and medics upto 12 - 15 months before they can be replanted in the sprayed ground. Also be careful to clean spray tank properly as minute residues that are left behind can still cause damage to other plants.
Fill spray tank with water and add good old no name brand bleach at 500 ml to 100 litres of water, mix it up for a while then flush with clean water. laugh
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/06/2007 10:06

That would tally with our observations. The Patto's infestation is repeated and quite widespread though. I was interested to hear the Landmark agronomist bloke say that winter is actually when you should hit it. Amazing weed, pity it's not useful.

What I'd really like to do is sow some native grass in its wake, grey poa seems to be what grows up my way. Where do you get such stuff? I'm not keen to go buy pots of it in nurseries! I need enough to spot-sow several hectares.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/06/2007 11:22

Just Google [Australia ] "pasture seed companies".
You will find a few that are quite reputable to deal with and will have a branch in your area which is important as their sales people and agronomists that give advice need to be familiar with the local conditions, particularly in your case, larger area pasture establishment.
You need something better than your average garden plant salesman.
Posted by: Cascade

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/06/2007 18:04

I mix MCPA 500 with IGRAN to kill patto & cape weed. The igran boosts the mcpa against the patto & does the job on the cape.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/06/2007 19:37

Ant try Owen Whitaker at Yass his expertise is in this area of Native Grasses....Due to the ongoing Drought a lot of native grass seed is in short supply but Owen always seems to know where to get some & his advice will put you on the right track.

If you have a look at Meribah Reserve on My Homepage you will see a photo of him & a planter he has for this specific purpose.

Happy trails !
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2007 08:55

Ant, so hard to get seed you can trust and getting Provenance seed would be impossible....maybe make a brush harvester for the front of the ute and collect your own.
I was thinking of making a really simple one I can basically leave on the roobar when travelling and pick up sample stands where ever you go ......not many collecting native grass ....I hear it's less than 0.5% of pasture grass collectors in Vic
A brushharvester for the ute only needs a soft brush instead of wire fingers (like a header front) and can be driven by an electric motor...as well as mechanically sweeping this long bottle brush spinning in a half case/body causing a draft that delivers the seed to the bin/tray .....you'd better google it if you haven't seen one.
Alternatively I've driven around with a piece of ordinary domestic house guttering on the front of the ute but most grass seeds are so light they just jumps out again ...some can be collected this way but, mitchell grass is one.
Collect your own I reckon....you can get a permit for public land .....and any farmer will do a deal with you ....thats the easiest....hardest is to find the clean stands of seed.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2007 09:09

When you guys wash up your spray gear and flush and so on.....do you do it in a pit or depression or what's the go?
Having such a small piece of land I've been washing up spray gear on top of the old defunct and filled-in sheep dip here ...which I've fenced off from the kids .....nasty bit of ground I figure.

This is an issue I haven't seen many guidelines for anywhere at all and having a pregnant daughter around makes me nervous ....sometimes wonder if she's safer in town.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2007 10:22

You have probably done as well as you can Dilbert. We flush the boom lines and tank out in the paddock with a couple hundred litres of clean water in the flush water tank that is a part of, like all modern spray rigs, the standard Goldacres 6000 litre boom spray rig.
Off topic but you might do better for your daughter to take care with a couple of other things, not just a couple of farm chemicals. ;http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/index.php?feed=Science&article=UPI-1-20070531-16491300-bc-ageofautism-crn.xml
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2007 11:36

Watching Catalyst the last few episodes was eye opening and something we all secretly knew anyway.......About aging and dementure and it's relationship to our diet. (Crank up that vegie garden guys wink )

I'm made pretty aware of this stuff like the inocculations by the women in my family....my older sis who was with NursingMothers as far back as the sixties and has been going on about some of these issues for ages. I recall their efforts to send aussie mothers breast milk to certain parts of the States as the mothers breastmilk there was contaminated with I think Teflon, gawd they coped some political crap...and lots of other stuff, too many to recall (understandable with my bad diet)........makes you think twice before scotchguarding the furniture.

This innoculation debacle has always been.....but always argued from the greater good perspective (OK if you support the affected)
My sis and few others started the Coeliac Group years ago after having two major operations herself and same for other members of the family (genetic problem) and was advise about her own outlook for a healthy life and did her usual thing and made it national .......well that's been a can of worms in a country that grows grain for a living laugh
Sometimes the truth gets stymied for lots of reasons.
While at the same time our understanding of our own biology is trailing badly anyway wink
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/06/2007 12:36

I found this mob in Nowra
http://www.seedworld.com.au/native_grasses.html
and they seem to have a pretty good range of grass seed and also tree and shrub seed.

I just have to work out what seed is best up here (dry, shaley, windy). Something the roos will like. I know they don't like clover! They eat around it on my lawn (dunno wehre it's come from, as we didn't buy lawn mix with clover in it, but there it is).
Posted by: Cascade

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/06/2007 11:11

Has anyone had the dung beetles working overtime?
I cant believe the amount of cow pats that are disappearing & mounds of soil in there place.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2007 15:26

Quote:
Originally posted by cascade:
Has anyone had the dung beetles working overtime?
I cant believe the amount of cow pats that are disappearing & mounds of soil in there place.
They've been doing a wonderful job here, very enthusiastic these little guys. laugh The horse poo is mixing wonderfully with the soil below and dare to leave a doggy-doo on the lawn for too long and they're into that, too. laugh

Cheers, Helen
Posted by: BD (Bucketing Down)

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/06/2007 07:39

We went for a long drive on Sunday through from Ad hills to Barossa to Burra to Peterborough to Orroroo and back. Country all looks magnificent, best I've seen for years. Nice to see farm dams with half to 2/3rd full water in them and water pools lying all the way along the sides of the roads, and many shades of beautiful green paddocks and green hills everywhere!
Sure makes a difference from the 2006 multiple shades of yellow, orange and brown!
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 05/06/2007 09:56

Absolutely Ian. Last year was a complete disaster for a lot of farmers here, but interestingly enough real estate still sold well. Our next door neighbour moved his family to Casterton and his property (which borders us on 3 sides) sold for a cool $1.2 million which was bought by another neighbouring farmer. Real pleased it was someone we knew. smile
Posted by: adon1

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2007 10:52

Hey all its adon but for some reason I cannot log in on my usual username. This is the best start we have had since I left school without a doubt! I didn't know how wet it had been while I was up at the mine. I had talked to the folks a couple of times but they forgot to mention that it hardly stopped raining for a week! We have had close to 50mm since I was last home and the crop that I had planted for me is just starting to come up. There are some minor issues but they will be easily fixed when the time is right. But one very happy miner/farmer typing this I can tell you!

There is some bad news though. My application for an overdraft was denied because they reckon by balance sheet is too weak.... WELL BLOODY DERRRR! So I give him a real serv over the phone about wht does his bank continually hammer me about increasing my limit on the credit card and the fact that the mining job I have acutally pays 3 times the amount I was asking for. He skwirmed about with no solid answers so I just said that I will look to other banks for the overdraft and if successful I will shift ALL my banking there. And how they were not making financial sence because they will loose more money in the longer term by not having my accounts with them. Further skwirming happened and then he came out with "is there anything else I can help you with?" To which I replied.....Get off my phone!
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2007 15:14

:bounce:

Hubby would like to do what you're doing, but don't you have to know someone who knows someone to get into that field? He really wants out where he is, but won't leave until he has a steady job to go to. smile
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2007 23:28

Well as far as mining goes I didn't have any connections(that I used) in the mining industry to get my job and they were so desperate to get people I didn't even have an interview! I would however not recomend he go to the mine I am on 'cos it is pretty terrible. The mine is OK but the boss is a.... well would get in trouble to use that word! The hardest part is to get the experience on the machines and also working on mines. After you have say 6 months working on a mine you find it heaps easier to get in. That's where mines like the one I am working on are good generally mines with a high turnover will be easier to get a go on but they have either crappy conditions, bad mamagment or are isolated. If you can kack it for a while then doors open up.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/06/2007 23:56

Banks are hopeless. Many years ago we needed some money to continue building my house. Owned the land outright, had a good track record with building, had a good public service job. But nope. 50 grand, for a female owner builder? no way. For a 3 bedroom brick box in tuggerangong, sure, but not for a strange house in a rural area. Scum. Eventually tried teh credit union i'd been with since birth, and the female manager said sure, not a problem, do you want more than 50 grand?
Banks SUCK.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/06/2007 21:58

Hi all very quick report from soggy south coast, just had 102mm over the weekend from a big rain, water now in phone lines so i'll be very brief as i'net keeps dropping out - sadly it tappered off very quickly inland 50 kms in from us in cropping area only got 11 to 15 mm and eastern wheat belt even less. the northern & eastern wheat belt are in a bad way, some destroying sheep now - no winter pasture, really hard for them to know if to plant a crop on less than 20mls of rain. testing my luck by being any longer - cheers FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 06/09/2007 22:12

How are you Goin over there FE ?
Did you get yourself a little tractor & What's happening on the farm with the Hwy re-route into your property ?
Getting Damn dry over here with the crops starting to die ? If it does'nt rain soon it will be All Over Red Rover
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/09/2007 09:14

Dry, dry, dry. It's depressing for us and we don't earn our living off the land. Can't remember what a day's good rain looks like. It's such a helpless feeling. I am not surprised that so many people on the land are suffering from depression.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/09/2007 10:40

Couple of well established and on the large size operators sited some 50 k's north of Horsham have told me in the last week that they have had a guts full and may be pulling out if this year is close to a wipe out.
In their area after this last weeks warm and dry that is about the case. Their season is about shot!
Crops being mown for what hay they can get before it dies or stock being put onto crops.
Still hanging in around just north of Horsham but!!
South of, the crops are still OK and still have a good chance of decent yields IF they get good rains.
Wheat was still running at over US$8/ bus or AUD$350 /tonne Chicago last night and AUD $495 on the Paris exchange a couple of days ago.
[ for city folks info, that is over twice of what we were getting 18 months ago before last years drought and before the perceived collapse in world grain stocks. ]
It twists your guts and makes one cry to watch the crops wilt when these prices are on offer and knowing that a good crop at prices like this would go a long way towards starting to get a lot of people out of deep financial and mental trouble.
Posted by: Mr Christo

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/09/2007 21:59

Here in the central west we have been pretty lucky. The canola is in flower and most crops look like they'll make it to windrowing. However the wheat in many cases is stressed for moisture. Its shocking to think after the autumn we had that we're back to praying for rain. Always optimistic, it'll rain........ one day.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/09/2007 12:18

There does not seem to be a thread running for this southern NSW area rain event Mon 10th so posting a comment here : Up till now it is a non event really with only enough light rain here this morning to barely settle the dust. Can't see much more in it....Radar atm showing most falls coming through south of Albury so looks like Gabby might have a smile
F E Have you gone fishin or what ?
Happy trails !
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 10/09/2007 13:02

Yeah, the threads always seem to "ring" us, without us actually having one! We were meant to get showers late in the day, but after a big grey buildup, we got a nice shower around noon, and d big lowering of temperature. But now the sun's poking out again. Hopefully we get some more, but sounds like this system looks good on the pictures but hasn't got much for us.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/09/2007 18:08

Hi All, Nothing wrong here Goody, just very short of time & energy ATM and not becos of fishing unfortunately!

Mrs FE’s dear old Dad (93 yoa) passed away 4 weeks ago, just a week b4 Mrs Fe headed off for her trip with our daughter to Europe & UK – my daughter’s last taste of freedom b4 getting married next year! They’ll be away for 8 weeks, so I’m here trying to keep the show on the road & battling – little mishaps like misplacing the cheque book for 3 days in a plastic bag of groceries etc…..found parts of the house I never knew existed in my frenzied search!!!

Yes Main Roads have purchased 72 out of our small 150 acre property & will probably take about another 5 acres next year, but that wasn’t all bad news as land prices here r now amongst some of the most expensive in Oz. Deer Park went in the sale as well as our house which we r leasing back in the short term while I build a new house. Building is a bit of a challenge ATM as WA (non Ag Section) is really booming with bucket loads of money flowing in from mining, & lots of tradesmen have gone chasing big dollars in the mining industry. I’m doing a fair bit myself, & have a team of “dads army” retired tradesmen lined up to help which is handy – it will probably take 2 years for me to get finished. ATM I’m bogged out & my sand pit is full of water – really annoying when farmers 20 kms inland have wonderful pasture, but r already reducing stock numbers becos there hasn’t been enough continual rain to get any reasonable runoff to fill their dams!

Yes after 3 months of chasing all over the south west & perth, & having driven dozens of different makes & models I finally made my mind up on a little 30hp 4wd hydrostatic JD with bucket & can lift a bale of hay -very operator friendly & very comfortable for old bones. It gets into Melboune on 17th Sept delivered to my place on 28th .

Its very wet here on the coast & absolutely perfect growing conditions, but as I mentioned above some farmers r battling for runoff – lot of bore sinking going on ATM – next question is how long will that underground water last?

I see the world demand for grain has passed the “tipping” point now & prices have reacted accordingly - & who can believe the absolute stupidity with grain shortages we r now going to use more grain than ever for fuel sources……..big slippery slope coming now “hungry tummies verse energy”…what a mess.

Some cropping areas in WA r looking very promising, northern wheat belt is very sad – no crop & no pasture, must nearly be the end of the line for a few up there…that’s the reality of global warming, most marginal ag zones get hit first. A chap I know just purchased a property down here on the “wetter” coastal strip that nobody wanted for years, cos it used to have more water covered ground than dry land every winter – he pick it up at a very reasonable price & recons it’s a bargin cos he hasn’t seen water over much of it in the last 3 years & recons he’ll put up with a 1 in 5 wet year from here on!!!

We’ve still got the venison business & I’ve got meat to pack tonite, so I’ll call it a day here & wish all u good & “goody”folk all the best …hows that retirement & those grandies going Heather?

:wave: FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/09/2007 21:00

Hi FE,

A lonely Willy Wagtail sings tonight & perhaps heralds the Gates of Hell open wide to swallow up those farming....It just will not rain ! The changes come & go though but are empty of any worthwhile moisture. We say another week will see the end of it but it goes on as the temperatures have stayed cool. Despite this now the crops have just run out of puff to get higher to make hay making a profitable venture rather than a saving grace. With grain prices sky high against those of last year many can see it is not worthwhile to carry stock on.
It means this year is far worse than the last & I can see we will have many walking wounded in our community to hold up.
We have had 2 months travelling around the World after first attending a Nieces Wedding in Alaska to arrive home not long before Mrs FE departed your shores.....It was a worry to me that everywhere we went people all said the weather was most out of the ordinary to what they have known.
Likewise here our country region is running out of tradesman so "What are they doing!" My town of 4000 people cannot boast a bricklayer as it seems it is to hard for the youngins like shearing where once a team could be found within the township without much of a problem.
I have been passed the John Deere place in Melb many times there on the Ring Rd with my truck driving experiences now ended so know well where your machine is coming from.... In the long run I'm sure your purchase will hold its value far better than another regarded cheap choice. In lifting some of these hay bales now one needs a pretty heavy tractor to begin with.
Don't work to hard there & be sure to text Mrs FE to tell her the Aussie $ is up to 85 cents so she can spend a bit more ha

I am battling on with health issues that have hobbled me a great deal but am not going to lie down just yet.

Happy trails for now !
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/09/2007 12:58

I lied it rained again last night 2 mm
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 20/09/2007 14:23

We got .2 mm (that's the airport, up on my hill I think we got less than that). From such a mighty-looking system, barely a thing.
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/09/2007 13:01

hows that retirement & those grandies going Heather?

Hello everyone laugh I am full time in our special needs class,I have never had so much fun & done anything so rewarding as working with these lovely kids,they are amazing .
Also doing courses left right & centre.

I have sent my enrolment papers away to be admitted as a " mature aged student "to study Psychology & Counselling.Fingers crossed on that one.I was a bit hesitant & have been tossing up about this for a year or so,I finally bit the bullet.

I am also on a major health /get fit kick,going to body pump classes,throwing a few weights around,playing squash for the first time in 23 years (ouch) walking & jogging every morning.
Going into my 2nd childhood I think.

The golfer in the family is having a lovely time,he is away playing near Dubbo today.The garden is looking good due to his efforts & some grey water.

Now the grandchildren smile ,they are all fantastic.That is what life is all about.
Life is good.
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/10/2007 14:44

Don't tell me you are being rained on again over there F E ? :evillaugh:
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/10/2007 11:59

Morning all,
I have just come back from Port Macquarie,it's school hols,had a family reunion.It was great to see those who turned up for the occasion.We all had a fun time.
Plenty of koalas roaming around Port it is not uncommon to have traffic stop for koalas crossing the road.Also got to see whales, that was a highlight.

The trip from here started out with brown barren countryside,crops failing,sad to see.
Gunnedah looks lovely.We arrived in Tamworth & things started to green up a lot the crops look great.Green as far as we could see.

Port Macquarie is a booming town.I am pleased I live out here in the peace & quiet though.Nice place to visit .We stayed in units across from Flynns Beach nice spot.
http://www.beachsideholidays.com/
http://www.australianexplorer.com/port_macquarie.htm

We came back through Coolah,Duneedoo still very green & crops doing well.Get to Dubbo & it is not doing to badly,once we get back to Narromine the dry starts again.

I hope it rains for everyone & soon,we are currently on level6 water restrictions,now that is fun.Not.
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/10/2007 16:46

Haveing fun bucketing water to our garden.

The washing machine water is used to water the tomatoes,radish,cucumbers etc & what little garden we have on the south side of the house.

We have containers in the showers to catch that water to put on our front garden.
All fun and games here atm.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2007 02:59

Hi All, sorry so long between posts,under the pump over here with new house project put back a few months becos of wet winter here on the coast. Mrs FE gets home next week & i've got dozens of unfinished jobs. i'm trying hard to get the bridge/culvert over the creek finished so she can drive from the front gate up to the house site excavation on our newly made road instead of 4WD over the still boggy flats & also hope to have the fence posts up alongside the driveway - post holes dug yesterday & had to put a few posts in as soon as digger finished as holes filled in with water on the flats. i've not checked my own records (a fair bit of adding to do & i haven't got to it) but i'd recon July, August & September would all be above average rain here. The new JD is going very, very, well - i love the hydo-drive & FEL is outstanding - really glad i bought the larger model than i first looked at - 30 HP with 4 WD is working where the old MF 165 can't go in winter - however with all the electronics on the new Johnny i dont recon it will be going in 40 years like old MF which is very basic in electrical dept....but has been a good honest tractor.
While on machinery, i hired a 25 tonne excavator to do the house site & roadway construction - now theres a machine that moves a lot of dirt really quickly - outstanding value for money.
On the coast here the season is absolutely outstanding - i have pasture feed foot high in many paddocks & looks like a bumper hay season ATM but 2 months to go yet..
Cheer FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2007 07:05

Interested in FEs earlier comment in regard to bore water and "how long will it last". When we moved back over here from WA we sunk a bore on our block and it has been going strong ever since (about five years), but because of the terrible drought conditions we are experiencing, more bores are being sunk in the area. The guys who drill the bores have a seven month waiting list. I'm wondering too, how long will it last? Does anyone on this wonderful Ag Weather Forum know anything about underground water? Are there any maps to be found of where underground water exists? Where it comes from? and how much there is of it? Noone here, even the organisation which issues the licenses seems to know.
Sounds like you are working pretty hard FE, with an exciting but huge job of re-establishing yourselves again. Hope you have plenty of helpers!
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2007 09:41

Hi Gabby,
I am presently endeavouring to determine how much underground bore water is still below in two bores we have on farm....hoping for the best but fearing the worst. Ground water which was near the surface here some years back has dropped some 20' now. Our granite rock hill outcrops are what is called the re-charge areas of our topography where water enters the ground to filter out many miles along layers or sand & gravels in the soil to provide this bore water which has built up over many thousands of years. I think in most situations where bore water exists it has originated in this way....Despite what some Water Diviners tell you it is not flowing along in an underground stream as if going through a railway tunnel.
This all works fine of course if it continues to rain but now the worry is these aquifiers will be all to soon pumped out. Some aquifier structures collapse once the water is taken out thus ruining them forever. Our Dept of Land & Water only have records (sometimes sketchy) on where bores are, how deep they are & what the yield was at the time of completition. I think you would have to go to the Murray Darling Basin Commission to glean the info you seek. If you are near the River & I think you are your water is more than likely coming from that source in these similar types of water bearing layers.
In the 1982 Drought here at Wagga Wagga I shut down my farm so to speak & went working for a friend putting down bores so picked up a lot of experience about it all. I recall at one site we brought up pieces of timber, leaf & bark debri from 165' down....Now how old would that have been ? I kept these things for many years but eventually threw them out.

You are working too hard over there FE steady up will you !!

Happy trails
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/10/2007 10:20

We sunk a bore on my hill a few years back. Central West Drillers did it. They had a divining stick, and surprised us by saying there was water. My place is quite high, I'm slightly above Telstra Tower in Canberra (so get good TV reception). It's very shaley. They drilled down 120 metres, apparently there are pockets and flows and little pools of water all the way down. They drilled through a band of very dense grey rock below the shale.

I'm very concerned about that water. It obviously flows down from the huge hill up behind me, but unless there's rain, how long will it last?

The family have an old bore that was on the farm when we got it. It's down in Canberra, right next to the Molonglo. Apparently there's an underground river there, called The Red. but in 82 the pressure from that bore slackened.
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2007 08:21

I have read a little about the Great Artesian Basin and wonder sometimes if some of the bore water within a reasonable distance comes from this. most schools of thought believe that water refills the GAB from the near by Great Dividing Range and from monsoon regions of our northern end, a smaller pocket of hydrologists? believe that it is a massive collection of water that has been there for thousands of years and will eventually run out. One wonders who is correct? If it runs out because of overuse what about the communities and landholders in that region who have access to nothing else but artesian water? if its an endless supply then why aren't we making more practical use of it? I am wondering if in some way the GAB controls most underground water in Australia? The chap who sunk our bore (his wife was a diviner) said that the water ran in underground streams and could come from as far away as New Guinea or Indonesia, my theory is that the GAB has something to do with it all. Its a mystery, but one, I would have thought would have been investigated more thoroughly, considering Australia's propensity to worsening droughts and the reliance of alot of people's livlihoods on the use of artesian water. None of our governments are pro active they always react afterwards - when it could be too late. Even in our present election frenzy I hear no mention of water or the dire straits the Murray Darling System is in, now. Perhaps this is not a popular topic, like tax cuts and therefore we won't mention it and it doesn't exist. I think we will rue the day we didn't do more now and I believe that artesian water is the key to our prosperity and survival. I didn't mean to become all political as this is such a low key forum,which is what I like about it, but many people who contribute posts are suffering and it kills me to read them and no one who can do anything about it seems to care other than to give handouts, which is a temporary solution. I could get on my high horse and go on and on. It all makes me so angry and at the same time very sad.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/10/2007 08:35

More tax cuts = less money for gov't to do things that only gov'ts can do. $15 a week is all very well, but that 15 bucks a week from every taxpayer is a lot of potential use if it's all in the one bucket.

It is frustrating when they go for quick fixes like new dams or desalinators. Expensive, bad for the environment. There are better ways.

There are things that only gov'ts can do but, like Gabby says, they resort to quick handouts, middle-class welfare to those who don't need it, and nothing useful for those who are struggling and suffering.

I want my taxes used for the strugglers and sufferers, and for sensible, thoughtful solutions. To whom do I return my share of the pork? I don't want it.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2007 00:48

Hi All, hey Gabby good to see ur post - nearing "c" season up north wink wink i fully agree with u & Ant, its a long time since we have had any "statesmen" in Oz - all reaction - "steering by the wake" either too late or over correcting....no real planing IMO!
Gabby i don't think anyone really knows where a lot of this underground water comes from - i've seen all types of maps, some showing "fresh water" stored under the ocean off WA coast - now how did that get there, how long has it been there - is it a "pool" or does it get recharged, or is it really there anyway - what quantity ?????? too many unknowns for us to just assume it will be there for ever!
other matters :- my good wife has returned from her overseas trip of UK & Europe - many things to tell me about - biggest surprise was the density of population thru Europe, polution & lack of insects, birds & animals thru countryside.......once in 100 year flodding happening every second year....to frightening for me to go to places like that!
i met a chap today who does whale counting, he tells me that only half the usual number of southern right whales came thru this year....
anyway its great to have her home & some normality returning to my life after 2 months.
Cheers FE
Posted by: Goody

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2007 14:45

Hello FE

Just to give you & possibly Gabby a clue on chasing the underground water trail. A man who worked on the Snowy Scheme & is an Englishman specialising in tunneling in Granite has the theory that most of the water we see on the surface of the Earth came from within.
Meaning when the crust of the Earth was formed ...His belief is the water that makes up our Oceans etc came out of the granite rock making up a difference of a % that is missing...If I have the Story right ?

Anyway, he has put out a book titled : The Voyage of Discovery his name is Lance Endersbee & the ISBN is : 0-646-45301-7

Happy trails ! :cheers:
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/11/2007 21:10

It's raining has been since 6pm tonight.(Cobar)
I am not checking the guage till morning.............if I can handle the wait.

Thunder every now & then ,some good heavy rain.

About time :cheers:
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2007 08:29

44mm overnight & more to come today.
Best night I have had for a long time.
Listening to that heavy rain.
Hope everyone else gets their share. :cheers:
Posted by: DNO

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2007 10:13

Great news Bushy. Hope you get plenty more before it leaves.
We are having a pretty good season here after getting good unseasonal winter rain, but would welcome a good storm or two any time now.
Storms about earlier in the week but we only got 3mm of rain. A few places north of Maxwelton got between 25-40mm so they should get a response.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2007 10:59

That's a great sound, heavy rain. Got a bit the other night with the storms. Only amounted to 3mm the lot, but while it was happening it was better than a Sibelius symphony.

We're not getting any decent totals out of any of these systems, just a few mm. I have heard that up in the Brindabellas there's been heavier totals, which is good, as that's where some of Canberra's dams are. It seems to peter as it heads east though. Tuggeranong gets double figs, Airport gets rubbish, and up on my hill we get a sprinkle.

Hey Bushy, why don't you stick "Cobar" in your location, on your profile? That way we'll all know where you're from all the time.
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2007 13:06

Just fixed the profile.
I thought it was there.


This is the best rain we have had for a long time. :cheers:
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/11/2007 13:34

Good to hear that some areas needing rain are finally getting it. Nothing nicer than the sound of rain on the roof and the smell of dry soil becoming wet. Just waiting our turn for a decent drop. I heard on the grapevine that NSW will be banning the use of bores along the Murray, so I'm hoping for rain to fill rhe tanks, before its made public!
Posted by: Farmweather

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/11/2007 06:48

Gday all slightly off topic but got the new "farmers phone" the next g with pull out ariel it is slightly better but alas still hasnt solved all the problems.

Been complaining since next g inception that my old cdma was far better or bag phone was better again, but anyway the recommended i upgrade to the f165 farmers phone and are no charging me $32 extra per month for the priviledge of upgrading to somehting that still isnt betyter than my old cdma.

Stndard reply is put ariels on tractors and all vehicles they dont realize we carry them around in our pockets

cheers
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/11/2007 09:26

I had a Bag Phone when I first moved out to my hill. I didn't have a landline for years. We brought power in from the back of the property, to conserve the remnant bushland near my front gate, but then we couldn't bring the phone line in the same way, so I had mobiles for years.

When they killed the analogue network (which was excellent), I got a digital. Did tests (brought 3 phones out on Telstra, Voda and Optus, and Telstra was the best). And it worked fine for years, and then suddenly the signal stopped working. It was still there, but unusable. (5-bar, too).

Telstra denied I had a signal, denied there was a tower on the Bungendore escarpment (I could SEE it!). Phone Ombudsman was USELESS. Then, after months, they activated Tower ID in my area, and suddenly, my signal worked again. Their lack of accountability though was a real eye-opener. And this was before it was flogged off fully.

I can't believe how they are stuffing rural people around, making them change phones every few years. What a joke! When I went to digital, I had a Nokia... the fat popular one (5110?). It only got replaced last year, after 2 new batteries (I got a tiny tri-band so I could use it in the US, cost me $80 on the 'net).
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/11/2007 09:59

If all you grain farming types out there want a few laughs on what not to do while harvesting go to the Combine Talk Show and have a look under Did You ever do anything so stupid.

Rain on the first few days of November, about 36mms, saved our hide from a total disaster again, at least where we are about 25 kms north of Horsham.
Crops are still green enough that they could take advantage of the rain for grain filling. A few more days and it would have been too late and we would have had just a few shrivelled up grains in the wheat heads.
Barley is further advanced and will get some but a lot less benefit.
Lentils are now filling what pods were there. They probably would have been almost a total wipe out without the rain but we may get a tonne / Ha from them now.
Very big differences across the Wimmera as the crops in the southern part are excellent as they got regular coastal showers. Those in the north Wimmera are about wiped out.
Posted by: ant

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 07/11/2007 11:47

These food issues are going to really bite the city people on the bum. Although I fear that the gov't will take the opportunity to buy in more cheap food from China (and don't ask too many questions about how it is produced).
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/12/2007 19:30

Happy Christmas all Straw Chewers where ever you are, very strange summer down here on the south coast with green feed at the end of December, but today & tomorrows heat will knock a bit of that over!! With the unseasonal start to summer, i'll have to do the firebreaks again at end of January by the looks of things!!!!
My wife is having Christmas in Sydney with my son, his wife & our only grand child, becos in recent months i've been having bad attacks of vertigo & Dr said i shouldn't fly until i'm over it.......if & when?
Anyway life goes on, its now 13 months since the govt bought our animal park for the highway development & i've just got homes for the last of our rooster & guinea pig collection - i'm already missing the bantams crowing all hours of the nite & it seems a bit strange seeing no animals except our 3 pet roos and that rotten old horse when i walk around the place.
On the positive side we've added another 2 bays to the shed on the new house site, got underground power into the shed & working, new house site has been excavated, roadway up to the building site is complete (few posts to go on side of culvert/bridge before someone falls off it) - i never envisaged the crossing being quite so high ready for climate change floods!!! now i'm trying to finish a new cattle fence around the house & shed site - having a hell of a lot of trouble bending down & getting up with vertigo so its been a long drawn out exercise but i'm nearly finished. i didn't want to put any sand fill over the excavated site without a good fence to stop adjisted cows coming in and "mucking" it up.
Other big hold up is that after waiting since October for my sand pit to dry out another 2 inches over the last few weeks has filled it up again & the sand pit is on the highest part of my farm!!! it seems that an underground stream popped up after i excavated the sand for the shed extension - haven't seen the bottom of the pit since May! anyway in the New Year i'll get an excavator back and cut a drainage trench out of it. sorry my posts have been a bit lite on this year, just time is rushing by & even with rotten daylight saving i'm still way behind schedule!
So have a Merry Christmas, Happy, Safe & good farming New Year where ever you are.
:wave: :cheers: FE
Posted by: Gabby

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/12/2007 06:04

Hope all of you had a great Christmas and that the New Year will bring you good health and prosperity. Hope your vertigo improves FE, sounds like you need to take it easy for a bit. It all won't be much good to you if you are not well enough to enjoy it in the finish. Some photos of progress would be nice!
Posted by: Farmweather

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 28/12/2007 21:27

harvest done here guys was between below average and poor
yielded from a high of 11 bags on some barley to 2 bags for wheat and everything in between

jack frost visited some where during grain fill

always next year anyone getting sick of that whilst chem cost fert cost and overdraft get higher.......
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/01/2008 17:43

HAPPY NEW YEAR :cheers: :cheers:
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 23/05/2008 12:49

Hi Bushy wink ....bit late though!

Any of you guys have a West Aus Forward Engineering airseeder bin? I'm curious if you've left the 'electrical relay released' dog on the seed feed standard or have modified it in any way.
I have a neighbours who has two of these and I modified both this morning as they were both having dropout problems and leaving bare patches (nasty nasty and all the neighbours will talk hehheheeeee)
Anyone fitted wireless/remote control stuff to these things at all...seems the logical progression for a one solenoid and 5 or 6 hall sensors setup...and to get rid of the 75ft wiring loom.
I'm not a farmer so maybe there is a reason why the manufacturer hasn't...but I can't see it.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/05/2008 10:21

I just played sheep dog with one of my radio controlled planes this morning to round up a small flock of 500 finewool wethers.
Easy easy when they have that merino gene that sends 'em in circles wink

The sheep were in a paddock with a wheel driven sprinker setup (the big figure 8 irrigators/sprinklers that are popping up everywhere) and the stupid idiots lay down and sleep in the wheel ruts of the sprinkler and get run over during the night. Dumb to get killed by a wheel moving at 1/2 a mile an hour.....but that's what's happening with thee young sheep. So we pushed them out of the paddock with my noisiest plane.
Farmer was impressed...but I told him not to dream the plane would replace a sheep dog .....planes don't work well ahead of a storm I told him.

Watching this mob milling/spinning around along the fence and then continuing rolling around as they spilled out the gate, it crossed my mind this gene may be the same gene that's in the urban population of us humans. I've seen the same behaviour at the Telstra Dome.
....wonder if I'm on to something? :rolleyes:
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/05/2008 12:05

Cor! Dilbert! I can see you now with an evil lear on your face as you drive that 3 metre monster of an aircraft around and above the milling crowd as it pours out of the Telstra Dome, all the time dropping smoke bombs and percussion grenades into critical areas and using the airborne Taser to round up breakaways as you herd them towards the Bus terminal. Metrail, Quantas, Virgin Blue, Yellow Cabs and etc, the direction depending on which of these has paid you the most on the day!!
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 29/05/2008 14:41

the problem with herding (should that be flocking maybe) these mobs is the last few generations have become dependant on handouts and everytime I go flying in their paddocks they tend to block the landing field by coming over to see what I have for them .....the whole lot of them are totally dependant and quite dumb about it.
Buzzing crossbreeds have little effect I've found and they barely lift their heads.
Found it to be the same with sheep too wink

I've spent much of the day scanning/copying schematics from tractor/equipment books. Knew everyone has stopped sowing during this lull and rang around this morning suggesting we make a data bank.
Everyones on board it seems...just copying all wiring diagrams and info into my computer and if nothing else we can email/fax from here when we chase bits.
Having everyone holding the same emailed/faxed diagram is a bargain though when guys are talking across the country.....especially when you want the right bits sent the first time.

being on the same page is what I'm trying to achieve here....saw a fair bit of confusion lately with wireless control systems that the manufacturer had sourced from three different suppliers on the same year/model equipment.

takes a bit of control to stand outside my shed for twenty minutes leaning on my actual rain gauge and the word itself was not mentioned.
Sorry but I have no idea how these guys maintain their composure. everything costs zillions ....diesels even dearer .....crop that's in has started germination on the last rain ....and is drying off nicely now frown
You don't need a phd in psychology to understand that ain't good for you.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/06/2008 11:35

With adelaide and melb airports shut with fog this morn ....who saw the jets circling over dimboola?
I took a heap of pics of all the circling trails .....never seen it before and certainly looked awesome.

Even now the jets are ripping up the sky on this route as they catch up I guess ....go have a look if you are in the area.
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/06/2008 19:50

Happens a couple of times a year, Dilbert
I have also seen them doing the same when there are no contrails, Just some silver specks going the wrong way so they get watched as to what in hell are they up to!
I reckon there may have been a bit of language in administration while they figured out how much extra fuel and the cost thereof was used up this morning.
The actual orbits, pilot speak, were half way between Dimboola and Minyip.
I have also seen some other weird patterns on occasions over head and I think it may have been test flights on aircraft after major maintenance or just some pilot getting a check flight in real life instead of on the simulator.
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2008 09:06

I've only been here a minute by comparison I suppose :p
Since 1980 I've seen lots of contrails in these clear skies we have. But nothing like the circles I could see yesterday.
ROM, You are just about underneath their circling area by the sounds of it....while for me it's way on the horizon at about WSWest.
Interesting watching them circling I thought they must be chasing an updraft laugh ...bit optimistic in my opinion. Bet they had the pencils out doing fuel calcs furiously though.
Your boy could maybe have put his crop in on what those jets burnt in those few minute. There would have been a few 'please explains' about in the airlines yesterday I guess.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2008 12:43

Must have been an amazing sight, Mike. You should post up the pics here. smile I for one would be real interested in seeing them. laugh
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2008 16:46

Amazing to me Helen smile but these guys in the bush are hard to impress apparently :p

I only spotted the contrail loops basically on the horizon and only had a kodacrap cam with me. mentioned them here hoping someone underneath the circling aircraft could have gotten some nice pics.
Twas a beautiful cobalt sky at the time too.

I'll send you a couple of littlies and one biggie of my best choice ...they aren't anything special Helen that's for sure.
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/06/2008 20:08

Look forward to it Mike and I've PM'd you my addy. laugh
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2008 00:09

Hi u straw chewers - nothing like a good rough nite on the south coast to get me back on WZ for an hour or so. How r u going over in SA Helen rain might jump up a bit when this lot get over there? Gee Dilbert u do get up to some tricks - model planes rounding up sheep - given me a few ideas for the little sods who keep getting into our place chasing roos - i recon i could put the fear of the almighty into them with a plane (with a big k/roo painted on the wings) - ROM ur idea of letting him have a go in telstra dome would be priceless - recon it would be worth paying for a private box so he could give an uniterupted flying display at about 5 mins from the end of a game!!!
i've been flat out with house building - progressing slowly & taking up a lot of time - all new rules & regs since i last built in 1985 - i can see why there a not as many owner builders about these days - but i'm getting thru the maze. absolutely wonderful season so far here on the coast feed everywhere - i decided to drop stock numbers a bit this year & have adopted a few very simple ideas to replace fertilizer this year ie stock reduction per ha.last few years i've been feeding out hay in very exact placements....heard they did this in the old days to build up pasture in weaker parts of the paddock - only fertilizer i will buy this year will be for the hay paddock. i'm looking at a spray on emulsion that a few chaps are playing with over here - like a giant liquid fertilizer unit - livestock poo, seaweed & some minerals & sprayed on - the trick is when to put it on - the soil must be moist so it gets into the ground to plant roots, but not washed away!?!
anyway must go, good to see u all still posting - got early start tomorrow..
Cheers FE
Posted by: Dilbert

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/06/2008 06:18

FE, My reflexes are shot but the kids are good enough to muster with these planes. I just teach them the basics and they take it to the 3D extreme where my thumbs won't take me.
The best flyers are the kids. Here an example, 13 years old. http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=_5wgP8zxNZM
My grandson out flys me consistantly, but somehow it doesn't bother you too much being outflown by your own progeny smile
All the planes we build here are electric/battery and we are limited to about 1.5 meter wing span because of battery cost....and are charged on solar panels as an example to the kids also. (my own get charged at the nearest powerpoint :p )

The thunder dome isn't a problem as you can see from the hovering and control in the vid......but mustering would be a waste of time as the sheep in our paddocks barely move out of the way when you land.....and take little notice when you buzz them. The concepts a bit much for our dumb vic sheep anyway ...they are more likely to run toward any activity hoping for a feed than run away from anything.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/06/2008 09:48

I along with a mate are also looking at alternative FE. We are looking into compost teas. Not so much a fertilizer but microbial inoculant for the soil. From reports of some using it in other areas, results can be seen in a week or two. Actually there is a bloke near bendigo who has changed his whole farm to this type of farming and his costs have gone through the floor. We are hoping to get in contact with him soon and have a look at his operation and see how we can go about getting it going here.
Posted by: Farmweather

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/07/2008 05:55

Gday guys long time no post
Crops are in and up and look ok for the marginal amount of moisture weve had 92mm for the year 212mm for same period last year.
Feed is scarce as is the rain but weve had 8mm from system just finishing
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/07/2008 01:46

Hi All, just a quick post, yes Dilbert i still have a model to make up, i had a lot of fun with wire flying as a kid b4 radio control, bought a big glider for my son, its still in the box in the shed so when this rotten house is built i'll build it for my grandson!
adon ur 100% right - most of these mixtures are "microbial inoculants" but the one i'm talking about seems to have 2 bob each way, as it does also contain enough "juice" to both "stimulate microbes & give plants a boost - its all very interesting, but basically u probably need to reduce stock numbers a bit as fertilizer certainly gives a higher grazing rate - but too costly for the bit extra now in my book - keep looking at other avenues!!!
Cheers FE
Posted by: SBT

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/07/2008 15:33

Compost Teas

Hi all I did a quick search and found this Australian website that has a lot of information.

On a smaller scale I used to make my own teas with dried cow poo, a cup of fish emulsion (Charlie Carp or seaweed extract) and a 44 gallon drum of rain water. Susupended the cow poo in an old onion bag and leave it submerged for a fortnight or so with the odd stir every time you walked past the drum. I then diluted it 4 to 1 (water to tea) My mango trees lapped it up as did the rest of the garden and veges.
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 03/09/2008 01:59

Hi Wobbles & All, flat out building just at the moment, but i have successfully put in a "sand" dam by forming up 3 banks on the lower & end sides of hole where we excavated the sand for the huge sand pad where i built. i was worried that the banks would let the water through at ground level, so to overcome this we fenced the dam off b4 winter so cows couldn't get in there & let the kyk go wild to bind it all up, now have it almost 7/8 full & ATM its holding despite the wet soil.
part of the reason i put this in (apart from supplying the sand for the build)was to get a source of "cleaner" water to use in pumps if we get this broad acre "fertilizing tea" thing going, i have been warned that the water from our clay dam will most likely fristy block spray nozzles & secondly may react/restrict/unbalance the nutritional process in the tea. i'm also putting in a 90,000 litre rainwater tank for house & shed as a backup to testing water quality for the "tea" as well as runing rainwater into the house for drinking & cooking, also for our bathroom. guest area will be on the scheme water so we are not telling visitors to stop wasting rain water with 1/2 hour showers!
it will be a while b4 i have enough time to get more into the "tea" got to get a roof over our heads & get on with the building, the footings & slabs are down & we hope to start laying bricks in 3 weeks time & have a roof on by end of January. cheers FE
Posted by: Joe Marshall

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 04/09/2008 22:31

Hi FE haven't posted on here for a long long time seems you are very busy with a new house is there any thing you can't do.I am just a hobby farmer these days the drought went on for 1 year too long. I had to sell all the breeder cows last year because we ran out of water, I guess we used the money to live on for the rest of the year now the drought seems over for us we don't have the moneyto rebuild the herd. We decided to put most of the farm up for sale and do a bit of cattle dealing, once we get a bit of money to buy a bigger cattle truck. Any how enough of my problems how have you been,we are getting good rain now this has beem the best season for about 15 years, hard to beleive it has been that long.
Cheers Joe
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 08/09/2008 02:01

Hi there Joe, good to hear from u again,sad to hear about ur battle with the drought - what can i say - u get put through all that pressure of trying to find feed & water & get cleaned out, then the next season comes up trumps mad mad just so hard for u & others in that situation....strange u mention that 15 year mark, depsite very good seasons here on the south coast since spring 2000, & the fact i put in contour banks about 4 years ago, our biggest dam still hasn't overflowed for about 15 years! even though i've only got half the old farm left after Main Roads purchased almost half the place for the new highway (a blessing in diguise as it turned out)i just can't stop puting water holes in whenever i get a chance - we have scheme, soaks, dams & rainwater, but i'm still frightened that with continued dropping of runoff & increasing demand i recon scheme will not be available for rural stock water soon.
re house building, its not that hard to do Joe, this is my 5th and last build over 35 years - i tend to overbuild to blazers - professional builders have to build to a price which is much harder job.
BTW theres a lot of things i know u can do that i can't Joe - pulling down & rebuilding engines & machinery for a start - i always have bits left over or run out of bits b4 i finish, & very often end up having to get help to get things going again - my welding looks like chickens feet, & when i tried shearing we almost filled the freezer up in the first & only run i tried & never completed wink wink
good luck with finding a suitable truck Joe & i hope theres some cattle about at a reasonable price - to u & others doing it hard over there & down in Tassie i truely hope things get better & some of those better seasons return & get to be more regular - regards :cheers: FE
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/12/2008 02:03

Hi all, a quick note from the rainfall record breaking south coast of WA- wettest November ever - despite that the big dam still didn't overflow - its about 15 years since it has... anyway with all the wet its back to redoing firebreaks atm - there is feed everywhere & my stocking rate is the lowest ever due to my earlier revolt against super prices & a slow attempt at dismantling our stock numbers in preparation for more retirement time. after 9 weeks of off again on again rain all the bricks have been laid in the new house and it will sit at wall plate height until early January when the roof frome goes on & cladding in early February. hope u all have a good christmas & prosperous new year :wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 13/12/2008 19:13

Hi there FE :wave: a very Merry Xmas to you and yours from a rather soggy (and getting soggier) Booborowie... 96.6mm so far this month and raining again.

...and to everyone else who frequents the Ag section, a safe and prosperous Xmas and New Year to you all.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Arnoldnut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 14/12/2008 08:41

I do wink
Dilbert and I would like to wish everybody happy hols smile ....I'd suggest this last year has been a little stressful to each and every households breadwinner and that's on top of the usual crap.
I'm recommending a 'party hard' approach these hols, so as to balancing this bull **** out laugh

At last saturdays community christmas party I had a wipe around and the general consensus here amongst the local grain growers is that we have received not too bad a supply of rain this year.....just about every bit of it at exactly the wrong time but smile
.....they were already partying hard laugh
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 17/12/2008 23:31

Merry Christmas everybody.
Another lousy year financially but Mother Bear [ wife ] and self are still in fine fettle and hope we remain so.
Compared to so many others we are in the Lucky Country and we will make it through OK.
Did some figures on our previous 15 years of rainfall from 1994 to 2008 inclusive here at the local Longerenong AWS.
We have missed out well over two years of total rainfall in the last 15 years when measured against our long term median rainfall.
Got that into the local press on Friday and it excited a lot of comment locally.
Mother Bear thought it quite funny when Rob Gell, the TV met guy came up with exactly the same comment on Saturday's weather so we reckon the BOM's clipping service got it and the met guys liked it so on it went.
I have said on a couple of threads that I am prepared to bet 5 bucks which is all I can afford to lose, that the Murray will come down in flood in 2009.
So here's hoping and all the best to all of you for 2009.
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/12/2008 08:30

I hope you're right ROM. I'll be living in cropping land (Junee) just north of the Bidgee and only a short drive to the Murray, would love to see such a spectacle as the Murray in flood, not to mention the enormous benefit to communities that rely on the river and the flora and fauna.

:cheers: Will
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 18/01/2009 23:54

Hi All Straw chewers, been a bit hot over here last few weeks - 41 on Friday - damned near melted me!!! anyway i had a great trip over to sydney for Xmas to visit our only 2 grandies (2 grandsons 6 weeks & 2 3/4 yoa). during our stay we took a train ride down the coast to Kiama to meet friends who took us out to Jambaroo - what a wondeful part of Oz - recon it could be better than my bit of heaven on the south coast here! loved to see the lush green - they tell me they cut hay all year round except for winter - now thats my type of country.
anyway back to house building now, roof frame 3/4 done, verandah framing this week, tin on in 2 weeks time so its all water proof be4 easter.
hope u regular s/chewers survived Xmas - anyone heard from goodie lately?
:wave: FE
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/01/2009 07:22

Hey there FE. :wave:

We were in Kiama in Oct. '07 for a couple of days, gorgeous area and took the train to Sydney for a day... don't know why NSW people complain about the trains, so. Great way to travel. cool

Nice to read that the new house is coming along. I bet you and Mrs. FE are getting excited now. laugh

Survived Xmas quite nicely, thankyou, although that was 3 weeks without pay, with Graeme having started a new job. Was okay though, knew it was going to happen, so budgeted accordingly.

Been crispy dry here without a skeric of rain. Only two days under 30ºC, three over the old ton and two over 40ºC. 44.6ºC on the 13th. frown Soul destroying stuff is summer, especially out here, but sometimes life dictates where you should live and works in your favour in the end. With approximately 700 wind turbines earmarked for the Mid North, Graeme will be in work for at least the next 20 years. laugh

Haven't heard from Goody for awhile, not since last year. I might drop him a line today and make sure that all's okay.

Cheers, Helen :cheers:
Posted by: Bushy

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 02/02/2009 13:30

Hello All
Just thought I would drop in & say hello.
Haven't been around much still busy with,school.grandkids & life in general.
Been pretty dry here as usual,getting a few storms now & then but like the most of Australia we could all do with some good soaking rain.
I have joined St Johns Ambo's keep busy learning first aid with them.I am going to join the local cadets & do a bit of community work with them as well.
Time to give a bit back to the community.
Hope you are all fit & well :cheers:
Posted by: Arnoldnut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/04/2009 16:30

Bushy, I thought you moved to town to retire laugh ......what happened???!!! laugh
Great to see everyone busy wink ......flat here myself .....not that I'm achieving anything but I have the neighhbours fooled.

Watching the commission of these fires last night i see the ‘community’ has asked that the Commission focus on the cause of the five major fires that were started by the electrical grids failures here in Vic.
Specifically pointing at the SWER (SingleWireEarthReturn) system we use here in the aussie bush.
Dangerous ******* it is and we should never have installed it.
People need to be educated about this stuff and not just accept pole fires as can’t be helped. SWER is the cause and the system needs to be looked at.
Replacing the single/one 12,700volt wire system with a wired earth return (dual wire) would cause some massive employment ......may be a good time to get it done!

I’d guess that this is pretty well not known to most townies that we have this SWER system ....but mark my words you guys are gunna get educated about this over the next little while…...papers will be full of it when the reporters get their heads around the implications of ‘earth return’ .......may take a moment however of it to gell with most reporters I'll guess ....don't expect Bolte to figure it out as it is beyond him (clown)

I'm thinking a linie career (either underground
or 'hot glover' overhead) wouldn't be a bad move for anyone in any of the many dying employments areas at the moment.
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 25/04/2009 13:40

Quite a few farmers around here have dry-sown their winter crops and it looks like it'll pay off with some half decent rain yesterday (average of about 12mm over the region), some nice heavy showers around today and more rain tomorrow.

:cheers: Will
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 09/05/2009 12:38

This one is for the farming types as it would probably be wasted on your average citizen.
It is from David Archibald\'s site and uses info that I have seen some time ago but is worth repeating.
David Archibald is well known in the world of climate physics as he has published a number of articles and papers on climate matters.

The very short article above really raises some quite astonishing scenarios.
With the strong possibility of global cooling the northern limits of North American agriculture will again move south and production from those northern areas will decrease.
Based on how far the limits moved north in the last few decades of global warming the calculations are that the movement south in a cooling climate again has the capabilities of completely wiping out the export share of the US agricultural production.
This without taking into account Canada's loss of production as well or all the effects of a global cooling climate on the other agricultural production areas at the same northern latitudes.
As the US is the world's largest agricultural exporter, this potentially disastrous scenario, and that is still all it is at this stage, from the global food supply aspect is quite frightening.

But as usual absolutely nothing will be done to boost agriculture as the farmers are destroying the earth according to all the fundamentalists green groups who seem to have unlimited access to the government ears.
So immense resources will be splashed on trying to eliminate an essential gas that will have no effect at all on global temperatures while a world food shortage will literally only take a few weeks to develop into a full blown global catastrophe.
Posted by: Arnost

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2009 13:49

http://business.smh.com.au/business/aust...14t.html?page=3

I think that some time back there was a discussion on the merrits of these schemes...

I think most agreed they would eventually bust. Snake-oil at its best! LOL
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 12/05/2009 19:53

It may be even worse for investors than outlined there, Arnost.
A near neighbor of mine who has since passed away had relations who are quite big in the Victorian timber industry.
As most people are probably aware, the Tasmanian Blue Gums that are so prominent in the plantation industry have a timber quality that is near useless for any other purpose other than pulp wood for paper production.
The huge numbers of Tasmanian Blue Gums in the dreary mono culture plantations found right across the higher rainfall areas of southern states are actually all cloned from a few selected and very fast growing individual trees so they are all very similar in their genetic make-up.

About a decade ago the first of the Blue Gum plantations were mature enough to harvest for their wood.
Now for good quality paper, the paper pulp needs to be made from a white pulp which of course needs a white timber such as the selected and cloned Blue Gums produce.
So it was with a good deal of shock that it was found that some of the early plantation trees were actually quite yellow in their wood making them completely unusable for the production of high quality pulp and paper.
Even worse was the realisation that the companies had no idea which plantations were planted with the yellow wood clones.
Effectively some plantations were quite useless due to their yellow wood but nobody knew which ones.
I don't know the end of this story or whether the problems of the yellow wood were overcome.
Nor do I know if the investors were ever told of this problem.

Unless owned by a farming family corporation which fully understands all the twists and quirks of agriculture, corporate owned farms which have city based investors as their prime ownership base are generally a disaster waiting to happen and often a blight on all the surrounding farms.
One such city corporate owned farm some tens of kilometres north of Horsham is known as the "carpet and hedge farm" by the locals.

The carpet is an unbroken sea of Bindii across the extensive group of properties which the could not care less operators spread around every road in the district as they move their machinery around between properties.
In doing so they spread the barbed Bindiii seed pods that cause a large number of punctures for the locals and a lot of lost time and money in constantly repairing tires and tubes on their vechiles and machinery plus the cost burden of trying to keep the bindii under control on their own properties.

The Hedge is the hedge of the noxious Horehound weed that infests the roadsides on all the roads around their properties again causing huge problems for the locals.

There is certainly no admiration for corporate farming amongst any farmers that I know.
Quiet derision might be better term and as for various corporate farms going broke, well that was to be expected sooner or later!
Without continuous further financial inputs from new investors, the corporate farms are rarely run well enough or efficiently enough to exist on their own self generated resources.
A very few are very good.
Most are abysmal and unfortunately the local farming sector usually carries the burden in so many ways where ever these city based investor owned corporate farms operate.
Posted by: adon

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 15/05/2009 20:18

ROM that is why I beleive that farms should be limited size and all run by owner/operators. Big farms around here have exactly the same problems and because they employ workers to do the hard yards, the little things get left behind. Whether it be weed control, preventing wind erosion(probably guess who I am refering to eh!) and maintaining fences. Only farmers who do the work themselves will do the hard jobs properly and look after the land they way it should be. Yes there are exeptions to the rule(god knows why annoying neighbour is an exeption!) but in general it is the truth. Also one or two dodgy farmers with smaller blocks may only run down a small bit of land. A corporate giant may stuff half the district!
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 19/05/2009 18:08

This ones a bit off topic but definitely comes under farm management.
A pretty oood site for keeping up with what stage the American crops are at can be found at StormX

A site for Ukranian, some Riussian and the central Asian Republic's ag information is Agrimarket
Posted by: Fine Elsewhere

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 16/06/2009 00:33

Hi All, just a quick not to tell u that the dust has not settled with collapse of Timber Corp & Great Southern, 2 of the bigger players in Blue Gum schemes over here by a long way...those of u who have followed WZ Staw Chewers over the years will know my views on this tax driven type industry & i see a chap on landline saying scheme was not much short of a rural pyramid scheme - seems he might have been right - nobody wanting tax breaks in a world recession has meant no new money?!? lot of worried landowners (ex-farmers) who had leased whole properties to blue gum industry for long term & had been happy with couple hundred thou a year lease fee, could be a bit short this year & hard to find what will graze on a blue gum plantation?
anyway, life goes on, a wonderful season down here, super almost at a "buy again" price, i'm looking at a little 3 pt linkage spreader that has good sized outlet might let me try (experiment) with a few alternatives....
See Canada wheat crops expected to be down so hopefully yhis might at least stablize price a bit - looks like it could be a reasonable wheat year over here ATM after dry May.
cheers FE
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/06/2009 10:54

A BBC article entitled; " World Hunger hits one billion."
Probably not many will read this as it is in the Ag Forum which is a pity as it is an indication of what is coming almost regardless of what world temperatures may do in the future.
Any global cooling will make the situation a lot worse from the food production aspect.
I sincerely hope not but humanity may be only a couple of decades away from it's greatest recorded historical catastrophe

I shouldn't be so despondent but from all my reading of the food production figures, in the end, they just do not stack up in a way that allows us to feed mankind's growing numbers without major changes taking place in all human societies across the globe.
We do actually now produce enough food to feed the 10 billion or so maximum future global population IF we were all vegetarians.
We are not nor ever likely to be amongst those who can afford meat.
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 21/06/2009 15:42

Pretty ordinary if you ask me ROM. Makes you wonder where we, as a society, place our priorities.

All I can say is get your own patch of land capable of supporting you and your family while it's still cheap and learn how to feed yourself.

:cheers: Will
Posted by: Arnoldnut

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/07/2009 09:51

Someone just sent me this and I thought this an appropriate place to share it.

http://www.break.com/usercontent/2009/5/firewood-731278.html

I just want one!! ....my 044 and block splitter sh#t me after seeing this! frown

Maybe i'm doing you all a disservice by showing you .....but I must!
Posted by: Helen

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 22/07/2009 12:40

That's awesome, Mike... don't have to worry about splinters or getting your feet wet. I want one!!!
Posted by: bigwilly

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/07/2009 18:13

It's a bit worrying reading all the reports out of the northern hemisphere about reduced and delayed crops (grain, fruit, nuts and potatos) due to unusual cold and frosts.

From reading some of the stuff ROM has posted I've come to the conclusion that we're one really bad northern hemisphere season away from a considerable or major global food shortage. If the cool to cold trends continue then we may not be too far away frown

:cheers: Will
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 30/07/2009 18:47

Indian s aren't looking too good either Will, as the SW monsoon is late and patchy.
India has just placed export bans again on any indian origin wheat and etc.
The late SW monsoon means late plantings of crops and it then becomes far less likely that there will be enough time left in the season for a second, double crop to be planted and harvested.

Add India's situation to the fact that Argentina who use to be one of our major grain export competitors a few years ago, may have to import wheat this year as a long drought has devastated Argentine agriculture.
There is still ample stocks of grain in the world for this year but a bad year this year could draw those stocks down and then when we get to about 28 days supply or about 70 million tonnes of grain in world grain reserves we are in pipeline territory.
The 28 days supplies is the time from farm storage to the consumer and the amount in that pipeline at any one time is very roughly around the 70 million tonnes out of a annual world production of over 1730 million tonnes of grain.
The International Grain Council's monthly report usually gives a good idea on how world grain supplies are going.
Usually this report comes out in the last days of the month but July's report is not yet up tonight.
PDF can be found here
Posted by: ROM

Re: Chewing Straw - Over the back fence. - 01/08/2009 12:23

The following should really be placed in the AGW thread for all to read as the production of nitrogen for crop production involves a lot of energy and therefore the considerable production of that iniquitous and minor atmospheric gas, CO2.
So there is a considerable amount of cold hard facts for the AGW believers to digest here but as it is agriculture, I have decided to place it in the AG for